#1
When I play at home and I have my 50 watt amp on 2 I get hard to control feedback.
So when pros are on stage playing gtr stood right in front of their stack with volume set high and with the monitors blasting out loud - why don't they get out of control feedback.
#2
For one, the band's aren't in small enclosed spaces.

For another, the volume on the amp might not be that high(if it's on at all) - it'll be mic'd up, and the sound you hear is that going through the PA. The guys on stage could be using in-ear monitors - this low volume also helps the sound guy with the drums, since there's less noise bleeding into the kit mics.
#3
It's mainly about the pickups. Stick some better potted pickups into your guitar and you'll be fine. The uncontrolled high pitch squeal is the pickup coils themselves vibrating. ie. it occurs even if you mute the strings.
Now if the feedback disappears when you mute the strings - then welcome to world of high volume guitar amps.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#4
the answer is pretty much - the soundman. theres a guy...with a massive board, who controls EVERYTHING. everything. its like having a musical god conducting the performance from across the room.

want feedback you get it. dont want it? it magically goes away.
Carvin CT624
Walden G630ce Acoustic
Carvin V3M, Avatar 2x12 WGS Reaper, vet 30
(crybaby, Fairfield circuitry Comp, GFS tuner, Vick Audio 73 Ram's Head, Xotic AC booster, lovepedal trem, TC Flashback, PGS Trinity Reverb, Walrus Audio Aetos power)
#6
Finding that sweet spot on the edge of feedback requires skill and experience. A guy standing in front of a dimed Marshall stack always pays attention to his gain, volume and tone, and uses hand muting to prevent runaway feedback. The difference between squealing feedback and endless guitar sustain is about 2db.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#7
Quote by adetheheat
When I play at home and I have my 50 watt amp on 2 I get hard to control feedback.
So when pros are on stage playing gtr stood right in front of their stack with volume set high and with the monitors blasting out loud - why don't they get out of control feedback.


1. Pros are often NOT running a stack with the volume set high. Mike Campbell of Tom Petty has a bank of Super Beatles behind him, but is actually running small Fenders off to the side that are simply miked. The bulk of his sound comes from a 1963 Fender Princeton and a 1954 Fender tweed Deluxe. He augments that with a custom Fender Excelsior and a Fender Vibrotane for Leslie-type effects.* Eric Clapton, at one recent concert, had a cluster of small amps UNDER the stage. Neal Schon has a row of five 4x12s across the stage. They're on, but Neal has tinnitus and can't really listen to them loud. Most of his sound is coming from Axe-FX modelers run direct to the sound system.

2. Stage volume is an issue for a lot of bands, as is losing their hearing and having bad sound through the PA. Bands are learning to live with a LOT lower stage volume and allowing the PA system to blast the audience.

3. Pros are probably not running as much gain as you are. Bedroom players tend to crank it up to make up for both lack of technique and the lack of other players in their personal band.

4. You're in a small enclosed space with four hard walls. That's feedback city.




`
Last edited by dspellman at Sep 30, 2015,
#8
Quote by adetheheat
When I play at home and I have my 50 watt amp on 2 I get hard to control feedback.
So when pros are on stage playing gtr stood right in front of their stack with volume set high and with the monitors blasting out loud - why don't they get out of control feedback.


a 50w amp on 2 isn't exactly "high volume". you are possibly playing too close to the amp, or your pickups are possibly not very good, or your gain is set to max, or all of those together..

what is the guitar?, what is the amp?, what are the settings? stomp box? etc.. i know it's a lot of work but more info helps.

fwiw, during soundcheck i used to find the "feedback zone" and stay out of it or work it for effect.

sorry spellman, but those guys aren't playing with power. excellent points though.
Last edited by ad_works at Sep 30, 2015,
#9
Ever notice that the guitar amps are usually behind the band and off to the sides? Musicians tend to arrange the stage so that the amps aren’t pointing at the guitar. Having a human torso between the amp and the strings does a lot to prevent feedback, even in a dive bar.
#10
Quote by ad_works
a 50w amp on 2 isn't exactly "high volume".

sorry spellman, but those guys aren't playing with power. excellent points though.


Depends. I've got at least two amps that give up most of their volume change by about 4 on the volume knob; those things often aren't linear. We've measured 'em; the rest of the way up the pot we get maybe another 3-5 dB. A lot of factors contribute to that.

In a bedroom, a low-power Line 6 Spyder can give you feedback...
#11
I suggest you get comfortable with turning off your volume in a dime and muting your strings.

It's really up to technique a lot of the time, whenever my buddy who's a bassist uses my setup everything squeels and feeds back like crazy; for me there's no issue.
..I was watching my death.
#12
A lot of folks are using modelers with headphones in their bedrooms these days. NO feedback from the amp because there isn't one in play.
#13
Quote by dspellman
A lot of folks are using modelers with headphones in their bedrooms these days. NO feedback from the amp because there isn't one in play.

But doing leads without an actual amp sucks ass.
..I was watching my death.
#14
You do realise that some of us WANT feedback, don't you?
The issue here doesn't sound like real string induced feedback but rather microphonic feedback - which is an entirely different and undesirable thing. That is normally a pickup problem.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#15
I'm thinking the same as Cathbard, microphonic pickup.

You shouldn't be getting feedback from an amp on 2 even in a small room. I can'tget feedback out of my Super Reverb if I stand a foot away and dime it. One guitar did squeal and honk and squall like mad though...until I potted the pickup, then it was just as quiet as all the rest.

First check it on a different rig to be sure it's actually a microphpnic pickup. the guitar I referred to above would just plain howl at me once the volume got past 3 or so. Nothing else would feedback with the amp at 10. So check your guitar on a different amp too, and different guitars on your amp as well.

Once you know it's a microphonic pickup, get some plain Gulfwax canning wax at a grocery store. I used a small potpourri pot to melt it, looks exactly like a small crock pot. Tie a string or wrap a wire to a screw hole and lower the pickup into the melted wax. Leave it in there until all bubbles stop. Remove it and clean off the wax on top soon as you can handle it. Don't worry about the wax on bottom it will never be seen.

If the wires on the underside are wrapped in tape, DO NOT remove that tape. For a humbucker with a metal cover, remove the cover.

Potting stops the vibration that is causing the feedback. Something in there is setting up a sympathetic vibration causing it to feedback, potting it fills in everything and nothing can move around any more. Some pickups are potted from the factory, I've seen some potted with epoxy. Doing it with wax is very effective, won't hurt anything if done right, and will last many years. You'll probably never have to do those pickups again.

I set up a wooden dowel to hang the wire attached to mine so I could just leave it for a bit, it took maybe 5 minutes for the bubbles to stop. No need to jiggle it around, just let the wax soak in once it's fully melted to a liquid. You can bobble it a little when first lowering it in, but don't get too energetic with it. The potpourri pot works well because it won't overheat the wax, I found a can lid from something like a coffee can to cover it and just let the wax cool in the pot for later use.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
Last edited by Paleo Pete at Sep 30, 2015,