#1
so i got this new schecter blackjack, ebony fretboard was very dry upon arrival. so i oiled it and it now has a weird discoloration spanning the first and second fret along the high e and b strings.

http://s1310.photobucket.com/user/jh1324/media/IMG_0007_zps0gc7bk4m.jpg.html?o=1

http://s1310.photobucket.com/user/jh1324/media/IMG_0013_zpshppypgxw.jpg.html?o=0


its been about 2 or 3 weeks since oiling, took the pics today.

anybody else run across this problem? it actually looks a little uglier than the pics show, like it stained the fretboard a rosewood color. why would it just saturate that section and not anywhere else? all the way up the neck looks like the rest of the fretboard in the pics. im a neurotic head and the nut action came too high which is fairly standard in my experience and the knife edges on the floyd rose came chewed up, so this is just buggin the crap outta me. any similiar experiences? and can i expect it to return to its normal color after time?

used music nomad f-one oil and wiped off the excess. the rest of the fretboard reacted normally. had normal streaking after oiling on all my other guitars but this is not that.
#2
If the knife edges of the bridge are chewed up, I'd definitely return it.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
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Shindeiru



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#3
yea, too late now tho. got it off amazon, no surplus, past return date and i didnt buy warranty.
guess i gambled but it was $400 off. its only chewed up in my opinion for a brand new bridge its not that bad. after i put graphite lube on the knife edges, posts and saddle grooves it returns to nearly perfect pitch with heavy use. when i took the bridge out to lube it i could just pick off thin flakes of metal and not much. so just chewed up imo for a brand new bridge. apart from the issues ive stated im in love with the guitar. having gotten it for a cut rate i wouldnt even mind putting more money into it for any repairs. past return date, no warranty, gotta roll with it.
#4
Well that's unfortunate.

Any amount of the bridge being chewed up will negatively affect tuning stability and new baseplates aren't exactly cheap. Oh well.

There's a possibility that the strange discolouration of the fretboard is actually superglue that's being used to hold the fret in. Perhaps the fret was coming out of its slot, so they superglued it in place to stop that from happening, but they weren't careful enough with applying it which left behind the mess you're seeing. Superglue can be removed with acetone, but it's a pain in the ass as it'll melt any plastic it comes in contact with. Including the binding and the finish.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
#5
yea, like i said gotta roll with it. having the knife edged filed could take care of that right?
as for the discoloration im almost positive it wasnt there until i oiled the fretboard. is it possible the oiling brought it to light so to speak if it is superglue? also im all but positive it came originally from musicians friend as i saw it as a stupid deal and then a few weeks later saw it on amazon for about $100 more. im thinking someone bought the stupid deal and then resold it on amazon. it seemed untouched from head to toe, brand spankin new. if it is superglue do u think it sloppy work from the factory? if you look below and above the first fret where the discoloration is present u can kind of notice what seems like a crack or imperfection in the wood. wondering if this problem has something to do with this cut of wood?
#6
Quote by jhug13 at #33617705
yea, like i said gotta roll with it. having the knife edged filed could take care of that right?

Maybe. It depends on how badly worn it is. There's not a whole lot to lose from trying since the baseplate already is damaged. It won't be easy to sharpen them though because the baseplate will be hardened (if it's a decent Floyd) and a file will just skate right over the surface.
as for the discoloration im almost positive it wasnt there until i oiled the fretboard. is it possible the oiling brought it to light so to speak if it is superglue?

Possibly. Depends on if it actually is superglue. It does look kind of like it from the pictures.
if it is superglue do u think it sloppy work from the factory?

Yes, obviously. Unless the previous owner did it.
if you look below and above the first fret where the discoloration is present u can kind of notice what seems like a crack or imperfection in the wood. wondering if this problem has something to do with this cut of wood?

That could very well explain why superglue would be there in the first place. The fretboard cracked because it got so dry (wood shrinks as it dries), and someone may have tried to seal up the crack with superglue.
Roses are red
Violets are blue
Omae wa mou
Shindeiru



Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Sep 30, 2015,
#7
To me it looks like there’s glue on that spot. It could be that a previous owner did a sloppy job repairing a loose fret with superglue. That would also explain the high nut action and worn knife edges—poor maintenance all around.

But it could just be uneven grain in the wood. Uneven grain in ebony is normal and something musicians have to get used to. The even-toned jet black wood is becoming scare because until this decade nobody harvested ebony sustainably—they just cut out the blackest wood and left the rest to rot. Some makers cover this up by staining the wood black, but others (like Schecter) don’t because the stain can turn your fingertips black.
#8
ahhh, does make sense. if the crack got larger i was gonna fill it myself with super glue and ebony wood dust. well, guess ill just look at it as function over cosmetics. too bad, rest of the fretboard is beautiful. thx for the help guy.
#9
yea ive read people talking about imperfections in ebony fretboards and it not being much to worry about. doesnt super glue to keep a fret in make it a pain for refret job?

before i lubed the bridge all i had to do was tap it up or down to throw it out of tune. wondering if the friction from whoever checked it before sending it out or even myself using it caused the damage to the knife edges before it was lubed.
#10
Quote by jhug13
doesnt super glue to keep a fret in make it a pain for refret job?


Not if you do it right and only use a tiny bit.
#11
ahh well thats good. hopefully it is just the cut of wood, dont really have the balls to try to take care of if with some sort of solvent. id prolly just make a bigger mess of things.

i was planning on investing in a gotoh bridge at some point anyway. its a floyd rose 1000 which i read is made to the same specs as the original but made in korea.
#13
think gorgomyte or steel wool might take at least some of it off?
#15
how temperamental is lighter fluid on unfinished wood it disperses quickly right? earlier in the thread i was suggested acetone. ive used it on bridges to bust rust but havent used it on wood before. i have 0000 steel wool to polish frets. should i use a light touch with it on a fretboard?
#16
If you want to get rid of the superglue you’ll probably need to use a solvent. There’s probably something at Home Depot that will take it off without damaging the wood. Find a woodworking forum and ask them what to use to get superglue off of ebony. Make sure to tell them what oil you just used on the fretboard.