#1
...I don't even know how to google this without exploding my brain, "distortion" having two different meanings does not help.

Either way, after the drama all ended well and my amp has been back for quite a while now. Everything sounds beautiful now, with one exception that still doesn't seem fixed: it's the Laney IRT60, and when using the in-built boost (preamp boost, I believe?) when there's already some gain and/or a distortion pedal in front of the amp (I have the TC Dark Matter), it distorts in a really ugly way (as in, we're not talking friendly, fluffy rock distortion but distortion as in the sound becoming really messy and terrible).

This only happens when using the boost or the pedal in front, using the "regular" amp distortion I can use as much gain as I like and everything sounds wonderful. I can have the lead channel with gain on 10 and it sounds all clear, but it becomes really ugly with 1/3 the gain and the boost added. Adding a ton of delay and reverb seems to make the issue worse, as in it starts distorting even with quite modest pedal/boost gain.

Now, I do remember this was not the case at the beginning - I remember trying out the lead channel + boost for absurd amounts of gain and it sounded all fine, it started behaving like this at some point down the line.

The idea I'm getting is that if it happens with only one type of gain, could it be one of the preamp tubes needing replacement?
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
There's no point in trying to convince a moron.
#2
That would make sense, assuming that it's a tube powered boost (I'm guessing so).

I'd grab a spare and try it out in whatever position powers the boost.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.
#3
There’s a hard limit on how much gain you can get before your signal turns to mud. Two things are happening: first, each gain stage compresses the sound, and you can only compress the signal so much before it’s just a wall of peaks and valleys. Phase cancellation can also kick in when too many gain stages are in play. You need to back off the gain somewhere in your signal chain.
#4
Why are you trying to use a distortion pedal on an already distorted channel? That will only turn the sound into mud. Does the same on my 2 channel amp. If I'm going to run it at anything more than a crunch sound, I don't use distortion with that channel.

If you're going to use a distortion pedal it will sound best through a clean channel. Trying to run it through a distorted channel will make it muddy and nasty sounding.

Also if you're going to play in a band, turn the gain down. It may sound great in the bedroom for practice, put it in a room with a band and it will get really muddy in a hurry, and won't cut through the mix. Cut back the gain. Took me a couple of years fighting my rig to finally come to my senses and figure that one out...
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#5
Quote by Paleo Pete
Why are you trying to use a distortion pedal on an already distorted channel? That will only turn the sound into mud. Does the same on my 2 channel amp. If I'm going to run it at anything more than a crunch sound, I don't use distortion with that channel.

If you're going to use a distortion pedal it will sound best through a clean channel. Trying to run it through a distorted channel will make it muddy and nasty sounding.

Also if you're going to play in a band, turn the gain down. It may sound great in the bedroom for practice, put it in a room with a band and it will get really muddy in a hurry, and won't cut through the mix. Cut back the gain. Took me a couple of years fighting my rig to finally come to my senses and figure that one out...

You missed the point completely. I'm using the pedal with the clean channel. When using the pedal or the boost, the sound becomes terrible, and it's NOT the sound of "too much gain" which I'm familiar with. When using just the regular amp gain setting, I can play even with gain on 10 with high output pickups (which is a ton more gain than the Dark Matter pedal can even do, and about 50x of what the boost can do) and it never gets muddy or ugly.

I know how to set my gain to sound good, don't worry about that.

That would make sense, assuming that it's a tube powered boost (I'm guessing so).

I'd grab a spare and try it out in whatever position powers the boost.

Yep, that's what I'm thinking. Still have two spare new preamp tubes from my, uuuuh, crisis (which turned out to be just a bad power tube...), and unlike changing power tubes it seems even I can't screw up swapping out preamp tubes so I'll see if that changes something.

Just a question: there's four preamp tubes and if I'm correct, they don't all have the same function. Any idea which one of them going bad could cause such an effect? (As I said, I did not encounter this issue at the beginning.)
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
There's no point in trying to convince a moron.
#6
@ jpnyc (ugh sorry I can't edit posts here, it's quite annoying): yep, I know what happens when you add too much gain and too much compression happens, but this is rather a case of the signal getting completely crushed to something really ugly rather than just becoming fizzy/muddy/flat.
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
There's no point in trying to convince a moron.
#7
I'm not sure, as I don't own the amp and haven't even played it, BUT you can probably find a diagram somewhere online that may tell you which tube is responsible for what. If not, you can just roll a preamp tube through each spot until you find the problem child.
I'm just a kickin' and a gougin' in the mud and the blood and the beer.