#1
I just got an Ibanez RG655 yesterday. This is my first guitar with a tremolo bridge. By the way, it kicks ass.

So I changed the strings a few hours ago, and I've been trying to tune it for over an hour now. The tremolo bridge also doesn't stay in place when I tune... It tilts up way too high when I try to tune, and each time I move to a new string, the rest of the strings get fucked up. It's just way out of tune now.

I also changed the string gauge from .9 to .10, but from what I understood the change isn't much and it shouldn't be a problem.

Actually I was surprised as it's my first guitar with a tremolo bridge. I thought I just change the strings and tune and continue playing.

So, what should I do now?
#2
You bought a guitar with a Floyd without knowing how to actually use one?

Oh dear. Should've done your homework prior to buying it.
I also changed the string gauge from .9 to .10, but from what I understood the change isn't much and it shouldn't be a problem.

Then you haven't understood how a Floyd works.

Heavier string gauges exhibit higher tension when tuned to pitch. Any slight changes in tension that are caused by slight changes in gauge will require completely re-setting up the Floyd for that particular gauge and tuning. And if the Floyd is out of balance, it'll mess up the guitar's action and intonation. So ensuring that the bridge is in balance and level is essential if you want your guitar to play right.
each time I move to a new string, the rest of the strings get fucked up. It's just way out of tune now.

This is normal for a Floyd. It occurs because of the way they're designed.

Setting up a Floyd properly is a balancing act. The tension of the strings when tuned up to pitch will try to match themselves in tension with the tension that the springs (in the back of the guitar) are imparting in the opposite direction.

If the tension of one of the strings changes in the action of tuning, the springs in the back will try to compensate for the change in tension by making the bridge fall forwards. Hence the 'tilts way too high' effect that you're seeing. In the action of the bridge falling forwards, all the adjacent strings will lose tension, making them all go flat.

In order for the Floyd to be set up correctly, the bridge needs to be floating while the baseplate of the bridge is running in parallel with the plane of the guitar's body.

So since you're changing the tension of the strings with a heavier gauge, you'll need to change the tension of the springs. You might also need to adjust the guitar's intonation with a change in gauge too.

If you want to know how to adjust all that stuff, Google is your friend. There's no point in me explaining how to do all that stuff as there are so many guides out there that'll explain everything you need to know.

Here you go:

http://lmgtfy.com/?q=How+to+set+up+a+Floyd+Rose+bridge
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Oct 1, 2015,
#3
Quote by Ameer27

I also changed the string gauge from .9 to .10, but from what I understood the change isn't much and it shouldn't be a problem.


*facedesk*
Gear:
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#4
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Oh dear. Should've done your homework prior to buying it.

You're right, maybe I should. Lol.

Thank you so much for the thorough explanations. I'll see what I can do about it.
#6
Damn... I just broke a string trying to tune it. I guess I'll have to send it in for setup. This is way too frustrating...
#7
Quote by Ameer27 at #33619659
Damn... I just broke a string trying to tune it. I guess I'll have to send it in for setup. This is way too frustrating...

Don't. The only thing you should be paying for is a new string.

You need to learn how to do this by yourself. It is your guitar after all. You shouldn't ever have to keep taking your guitar to a store and pay someone money every time you want it set up. Guitar setups are sometimes insultingly expensive and there's no promise that the tech there will know what they're doing anyway.

Floyds are not difficult to set up provided that you understand how they work, and you know what to adjust to achieve the desired outcome. Yes, the way Floyds are designed makes adjusting things like action and intonation a pain in the ass. But they can be adjusted, it just takes patience and a bit of trial and error.

There is one last thing I need to mention.

If you need to adjust the guitar's action, that is done by rotating the studs that the Floyd itself pivots on up and down. But it's very important to remember to NEVER adjust those posts when the guitar is under full string and spring tension. Because if you do, what happens is by turning the posts, the knife edges (the areas that the Floyd pivots on against the posts) will get damaged. You want to avoid damaging those areas at all costs. Those areas of the bridge are what allow the bridge to pivot back and forth smoothly and efficiently against the posts, so that the guitar can stay in tune. Turning those posts under string tension grinds the pivot posts against the knife edges and it dulls/chews them up. When that happens, the bridge can never hold in tune again. So don't do it.

If need to adjust the guitar's action, you need to loosen off all the strings and take the springs out. It's a huge pain in the ass, but it prevents any damage from occurring.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Oct 2, 2015,
#8
^this.
Learn by doing. I do not like restringing and setting up floyds but I learned to do it. It's like driving a manual transmission vehicle, once you learn how to do it you're good to go and it makes you appreciate non-trem guitars even more.

Definitely do not pay money for something you can learn to do yourself. Just do your homework and be persistent. You will figure it out. Just have to find the balance.
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#9
Quote by bobafettacheese at #33619857
It's like driving a manual transmission vehicle, once you learn how to do it you're good to go and it makes you appreciate non-trem guitars even more.

Manual trannys are fun to use though. They're much less expensive to maintain, more reliable, there's less power loss, they're more economical on fuel and they give you more control over the vehicle.
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I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Oct 2, 2015,
#10
I'm a firm believer in the notion that every guitar player should learn how to set up their guitars themselves. Not only will it save much time and money, but it gives you a better understanding of your guitars. I recommend buying Dan Erlkewine's excellent guide:

www.amazon.com/Make-Your-Electric-Guitar-Great/dp/0879309989
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#11
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
You bought a guitar with a Floyd without knowing how to actually use one?

Oh dear. Should've done your homework prior to buying it.


How would he do that, exactly? Of course you're going to figure out the thing better once you have it.

I mean, the rest of your advice is spot-on (EDIT: actually, no it isn't, see below! ), but I sometimes wonder if people actually want to help or want to get to be rude to people.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE

In order for the Floyd to be set up correctly, the bridge needs to be floating while the baseplate of the bridge is running in parallel with the plane of the guitar's body.


Oooooooh mistake

The 655 has an original edge. The original edge's baseplate is actually angled and therefore isn't what you want to be parallel, it's the knife edge.

http://www.ibanezrules.com/tech/setup/angle.htm#ED

Maybe you should do your homework before giving advice

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE


No don't do that, because an Edge is actually sufficiently different from an OFR that that will send you down the wrong track for some specific things (the aforementioned knife edge and baseplate angle, and also the locking studs).

The IbanezRules site I linked to has (I think, I'm no pro at setting guitars up, I'm pretty hesitant at it myself ) a pretty decent guide to setting up Ibanez trems in the link I posted above.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

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Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Last edited by Dave_Mc at Oct 2, 2015,
#12
Really priceless tips so far. Thanks a lot guys.

I did work around it in the end. I ended up getting a standard .09 set of strings. and everything was fine. I guess I'll just stick to that. I usually play .09's anyway, but just wanted to try something different.

And I agree with the guys who said it's better to learn to setup your own guitar yourself. I've been reading a bit on Floyds. I have a better understanding of how they work now.
#13
Quote by Dave_Mc
How would he do that, exactly? Of course you're going to figure out the thing better once you have it.

I mean, the rest of your advice is spot-on (EDIT: actually, no it isn't, see below! ), but I sometimes wonder if people actually want to help or want to get to be rude to people.


Oooooooh mistake

The 655 has an original edge. The original edge's baseplate is actually angled and therefore isn't what you want to be parallel, it's the knife edge.

http://www.ibanezrules.com/tech/setup/angle.htm#ED

Maybe you should do your homework before giving advice


No don't do that, because an Edge is actually sufficiently different from an OFR that that will send you down the wrong track for some specific things (the aforementioned knife edge and baseplate angle, and also the locking studs).

The IbanezRules site I linked to has (I think, I'm no pro at setting guitars up, I'm pretty hesitant at it myself ) a pretty decent guide to setting up Ibanez trems in the link I posted above.

Thank you a lot for the website. Looks like it might help me a ton. If you haven't mentioned this fact about Edge bridges, I would probably have gone quite a long while without knowing. I'll check how my bridge is set up tomorrow, as I've had enough for today, lol.
#14
Quote by Dave_Mc at #33620625
How would he do that, exactly? Of course you're going to figure out the thing better once you have it.

Google?
I mean, the rest of your advice is spot-on (EDIT: actually, no it isn't, see below! ), but I sometimes wonder if people actually want to help or want to get to be rude to people.

It's pretty ignorant to spend a substantial amount of money on something and then have no idea how to use what you just bought. But that's just me. I think doing some prior research is common sense, and that can easily be done with a simple Google search.
Oooooooh mistake

The 655 has an original edge. The original edge's baseplate is actually angled and therefore isn't what you want to be parallel, it's the knife edge.

http://www.ibanezrules.com/tech/setup/angle.htm#ED

Maybe you should do your homework before giving advice

Duly noted. Though I could technically argue that what I said was correct, because while the topside of the baseplate may be angled, the underside is flat.

I don't understand why they design it in a way that goes against convention though. It doesn't serve any meaningful purpose as far as I can tell other than to mislead people.
No don't do that, because an Edge is actually sufficiently different from an OFR that that will send you down the wrong track for some specific things (the aforementioned knife edge and baseplate angle, and also the locking studs).

Useful information can still be taken from whatever information he reads for searching that though. He doesn't even understand the basic principles of Floyds, let alone Ibanez Edge bridges. And they all work exactly the same way. Even if a couple of components look slightly different, they all serve the same function as one another. If one knows how to set up any Floyd, one can work out with a bit of initiative how to set up pretty much all of them.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Oct 3, 2015,
#15
ah come on now, that's backpedalling if i ever heard it.

most of your advice is great, but you could dial back on the snide remarks to threadstarters a bit. It'd make you look better too, IMO. (at least at the start when they're asking a genuine question- if the TS gets rude or whatever then that's different, but IMO there's no need to be rude immediately after the initial question.)

if people did all that research we'd have no forum. fwiw.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
Last edited by Dave_Mc at Oct 3, 2015,
#16
Quote by Dave_Mc at #33621946
ah come on now, that's backpedalling if i ever heard it.

I wasn't serious.
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Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

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#17
ok
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#18
I am of mixed feelings. Although T00DEEPBLUE slapped Ameer27 upside the head a little bit. He gave valuable advice and information and Ameer27 to his credit took it well. T00DEEPBLUE said what we were all thinking but were too polite to say anything about. So it is valuable to all of us to research our equipment before buying so we really know how to use this stuff and not wasting time money and getting the wrong impression on equipment based on our own ignorance.
#19
Having been burned a time or two I've learned to thoroughly research before purchasing music gear. I spend weeks even months at times researching prior to making a major purchase, at least when I am not familiar with the product.

That said this comes from experience, I also try to buy any new gear only if there is a adequate return policy. Again this comes from experience, nothing worse than getting stuck with something you don't like and having buyer's remorse.

Most of us make a few mistakes in the beginning!

In this case the OP may have jumped the gun, but learned something valuable in the process.
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#20
Quote by Ameer27


Actually I was surprised as it's my first guitar with a tremolo bridge. I thought I just change the strings and tune and continue playing.

So, what should I do now?


Oops.

I have a feeling you're not alone in this.
Once you really understand the bridge and get a few important tips on handling it, it's really not an issue any more.

I have a shirt (from "friends") that states, "My function in life is to be a cautionary tale to others." Your post will do the same.
#21
TS,

If you haven't picked up on this yet, all you need to know about floating trem tuning is block the bridge to the angle you want it at, change strings/tune/intonate/etc. then adjust the spring tension so that the bridge stays in the same position when you pull out the blocks.

That's the practical side of how to make your spring tension = your string tension.

Oh, and like any guitar, if you want it to stay in tune, stretch each string until it stops losing pitch. Do this before locking the nut, and if you don't have fucked-up knife-edges, then it should stay in tune until the next string change, or drastic temperature change (which can be corrected with minor adjustments to the spring tension.) Throw away your trem spring cover. And when you get good at it, you'll be able to know how many cents flat to leave each string in tune so that when you lock the nut it's in perfect tune without further adjustment.

There's a lot of other information out there, but a lot of it is wrong (like doing the strings in a certain order, etc.)

There is no magic to a double-locking floating trem (a.k.a. Floyd, Edge, etc). It's as simple as I described above.
#22
Quote by Evilnine

Most of us make a few mistakes in the beginning!


Yeah that's kind of what I meant. Who here can say they haven't done something silly when new to any new hobby?

I know I certainly made a panicked phone call to the shop I bought my guitar from when I took all the strings off my Ibanez and the floyd sunk into the body
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?