#1
Hey guys --

I've had an LTD FX 260 SM for about a year now; received it as a gift from my mom and dad for Christmas last year, which was awesome and I really appreciated it.

Anyway, there's been an issue with the guitar that I have not been able to resolve. It's got fret buzz when fretting above the twelfth fret, unless I raise the action to a fairly ridiculous height. In addition, and even more serious to me, the higher notes just do not sustain as long as I'd like, especially on the middle strings. It seems like it is a setup issue, but it seems like I've tried everything. On notes above the twelfth fret, they sustain for a little while, but then die-off pretty quickly. It would be one thing if the notes died gradually, but they sound out and then go silent pretty instantly. I can't get rid of the problem without raising my action way higher than ideal.

My Schecter Blackjack sustains FOREVER when I want it to. Overall, it just feels like a much higher quality guitar and I don't have any issues when playing it. It does have active Blackout pups, but my LTD has Duncan Black Winters which are also very high-output. I don't think the issue is with the pickups. Anyhow, I've even checked for high-frets using a business card spanned across three frets, and I can't find anything.

In a nutshell, I WANT to like this guitar, but it's just not doing it for me. I'd feel bad getting rid of it as it was a very nice gift, but something tells me I'd be happier trading it in for another Schecter...

How do you guys decide when it's time to let one go?
Atmospheric dark metal w/ black and death metal influences:
(My Soundcloud page):

Pestilential Flood
#2
Check the nut? That's the only thing you didn't mention.

As far as letting a guitar go - it's been a while since I let one go. Now that I'm a bit older, there isn't much point in letting go of instruments. I can afford to keep them. It was different when I was a teen - wheelin and dealin to change things up, working with a limited income. Swapping pedals and stuff with buddies. Selling and trading is just a fun way to lose your butt on a bought new instrument. My suggestion - just keep it and try to make it playable. Whatever route you go, you'll lose money on it - mod or sell. I suppose if I were to get rid of an instrument, it would be more of an aesthetic thing than a playability thing.
Gear: Gibson Les Paul Studio, Gibson SG Special, Fender Stratocaster, Fender Telecaster, Fender Jazzmaster, Gretsch Pro Jet, Carvin C350, Epiphone ES-339 P90, Epiphone ES-335 Pro. Peavey 6505, Sovtek MIG-100, Vox AC30, Peavey XXX.
#3
Use something more precise than a business card to check if your frets are level.
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Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Oct 3, 2015,
#5
Just take the guitar to a tech who can file down the high fret. Otherwise you’ll spend more by selling the guitar cheap and replacing it with another guitar.
#6
Quote by jpnyc
Just take the guitar to a tech who can file down the high fret. Otherwise you’ll spend more by selling the guitar cheap and replacing it with another guitar.



^^^ do this first ^^^ then come back and tell us how you like it now
#7
agree pro set up might help. the worst that will happen is that the guitar plays a little better making it easier to sell.

to answer the actual ? i let them go when they no longer serve there purpose. it's been a long time since i bought a guitar that doesn't cut it. experience took care of that. so realistically the only time i let one go is to fund another one that i'd like better. i'm not to attached to any of my gear so if i find something that will work better for me i'll let go of what i've got. having gear that works the best for me (within budget) is more important than sentiment.
#8
Quote by ThunderPunk
Check the nut? That's the only thing you didn't mention.

As far as letting a guitar go - it's been a while since I let one go. Now that I'm a bit older, there isn't much point in letting go of instruments. I can afford to keep them. It was different when I was a teen - wheelin and dealin to change things up, working with a limited income. Swapping pedals and stuff with buddies. Selling and trading is just a fun way to lose your butt on a bought new instrument. My suggestion - just keep it and try to make it playable. Whatever route you go, you'll lose money on it - mod or sell. I suppose if I were to get rid of an instrument, it would be more of an aesthetic thing than a playability thing.


I was wondering about the nut. It does seem like the string height at the nut is slightly lower than on my other guitar. But I haven't given it much consideration because it doesn't seem like that would affect fretted notes --- or can it? There is some fret buzz on the lower strings as well, especially when playing an open E -- I can definitely see how a worn nut could lend itself to that. But if the nut can affect other areas, even fretted notes higher up, I'll definitely look into that.

As for trading it in for another guitar -- that's pretty much my only option other than fixing it. I too prefer to keep things unless I can't stand them. But I have little to no expendable income. Aesthetically, it's a beautiful guitar and I suspect I could get a fair amount for it.
Atmospheric dark metal w/ black and death metal influences:
(My Soundcloud page):

Pestilential Flood
#9
Quote by KailM
I was wondering about the nut. It does seem like the string height at the nut is slightly lower than on my other guitar. But I haven't given it much consideration because it doesn't seem like that would affect fretted notes --- or can it? There is some fret buzz on the lower strings as well, especially when playing an open E -- I can definitely see how a worn nut could lend itself to that. But if the nut can affect other areas, even fretted notes higher up, I'll definitely look into that.

As for trading it in for another guitar -- that's pretty much my only option other than fixing it. I too prefer to keep things unless I can't stand them. But I have little to no expendable income. Aesthetically, it's a beautiful guitar and I suspect I could get a fair amount for it.


bad nut slotting can cause issues for sure.
#10
But I haven't given it much consideration because it (the nut) doesn't seem like that would affect fretted notes --- or can it?

String nuts only cause fret buzz on open notes. The only area of the string that vibrates (or at least the only area that matters) when a note is fretted is between the fret and the bridge. So it physically can't.

The only way nut action could be of consequence for fret buzz on fretted notes is if a person lowers the action to try and compensate for a nut whose action is too high, making it harder to fret lower notes. But then the problem with fret buzz on fretted notes isn't being caused by the nut, it's caused by the bridge been set too low.
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I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
Last edited by T00DEEPBLUE at Oct 4, 2015,
#11
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
String nuts only cause fret buzz on open notes. The only area of the string that vibrates (or at least the only area that matters) when a note is fretted is between the fret and the bridge. So it physically can't.

The only way nut action could be of consequence for fret buzz on fretted notes is if a person lowers the action to try and compensate for a nut whose action is too high, making it harder to fret lower notes. But then the problem with fret buzz on fretted notes isn't being caused by the nut, it's caused by the bridge been set too low.



I must have a high-fret (or two...or three) then. When it comes down to it, if you've got a note fretted, the only thing that can stop the vibration (other than time) is if the string is hitting a fret slightly. I've taken care not to set my pickups too close to the strings; I'm aware the magnetic pull can weaken the vibration. So what else could it be?

I can get the notes to sustain with vibrato, but only if the amp is cranked to feedback levels. And even then, it's a fight to get it to sustain. When I just hold a higher note, it'll sustain for about 4 seconds and then fade out very quickly; almost instantly after that period.

I think it's time I bite the bullet and just take it to a tech. I like to do everything myself but this thing just baffles me.
Atmospheric dark metal w/ black and death metal influences:
(My Soundcloud page):

Pestilential Flood
#12
It's partially a setup issue (you probably have a couple of high frets).
If you were to give this guitar a good PLEK job and if your tech polished the frets, a lot of things would change for you. Simply handing over a couple of bills for a routine setup isn't going to do it for you.

Second, find a tech who knows how to superglue your frets.

Most frets in modern production guitars are simply pressed in, and often the fret tang floats in a fret slot that has a lot of air surrounding the fret. This can lead to "dead" frets and loss of sustain (and that ever-elusive "tone"). Here's the logic and the process: http://www.stewmac.com/How-To/Online_Resources/Neck_Building_and_Repair_and_Setup/Super_glue_your_frets_for_better_tone.html

Gary Brawer in San Francisco has been supergluing my frets and then running a PLEK on them, followed by a really good setup, and my guitars come back pretty much perfect, and far better than new.