#1
I'm looking for a higher end Bass. Problem is that I can't play and feel anything other than Fender or low end Ibbys, Ltds etc. I play in a cover band, mostly classic rock, and have 2 main Basses, both with good points and bad. 1-early 90s Carvin LB70, great overall bass but not quite the right feel. Plus, being an older Carvin, the truss rod is useless so I can't do a full proper setup. 2-mid 90s Ibanez ATK. I love the sound and feel of this beast but it's heavy. Very heavy. And it has the fattest neck I've ever felt. I know, Ibby and Fat Neck are polar opposites but the ATK is a unique beast.
Budget is under $2000 U.S.

I've played lower end Warwick, Lakland, G&L, Ibby SR and all the Fender lines. Not impressed. I prefer a narrower neck but not quite Ibby SR narrow. And 24 frets. Active/passive doesn't matter.

Was thinking of a custom Carvin but always a risk when you can't play it first.

Any suggestions would be great.
#2
How is the truss rod on your Carvin useless? Has it maxed out (can't tighten any more)? If that's the case, a washer or two will do the trick.

Your budget is nice, but probably excessive. And, requiring 24 frets can limit your choices. I'd keep an eye open for a 1st gen Fender Dimension. They are hidden gems that can be found in excellent condition for a very reasonable price. Smaller body, similar to an Ibby SR. Nut width is 1 9/16", fretboard radius is 12", and the neck isn't as thin as the SR. Plays very nicely. Of all the basses I've owned over the past 30 years, it's my favorite to play.




Good luck with the search!
"Quick to judge. Quick to anger. Slow to understand. Ignorance and prejudice and fear walk hand-in-hand."
- Rush, "Witch Hunt"
#3
That's a beauty! Never seen that model. Thanks.
As far as the truss rod on my Carvin, it just doesn't do anything. I can loosen it or tighten it to the max and the relief doesn't change.
#5
I'd say the budget you've given yourself is easily going to put you in the "don't even bother looking at the price tag" category if you're willing to shop used. BUT, don't let the prices fool you. I bought an Ibby SR800 new in 1991. Never found anything else that I liked the feel of, regardless of price, until on a whim I picked up a Squire Bronco for $90. Dethroned the Ibby.

Limiting yourself to a price range will exclude lots of basses you might totally love. Electronics and hardware can be upgraded. An inexpensive bass that feels great and plays wonderfully, but has a bridge and/or pups that need upgraded might be a winner, and still come in well under a $2000 budget after all upgrading is done.

I'd suggest you play everything you can get your hands on, and work "process of elimination" until you have a short list. From there, narrow down the choices by amount of work (if any) they'd need to be perfect.

dos centavos
#6
Never tried a Fender Dimension. Not a Fender fan in general. I played 2 identical American Standard P basses the other day. On was nice, the other had sharp fret ends, nut was filed too low and just overall poor fit and finish.

I don't see a nice budget as limiting but quite the opposite. It doesn't have to cost $2000. That's just as high as I'm willing to go.
And I almost always buy used. Better value, already broken in and it's hard to find anything from a major company these days that can compete with its predecessor of 60s-80s. They just don't build them like they used to.
#7
Quote by Jcrider303
Never tried a Fender Dimension. Not a Fender fan in general. I played 2 identical American Standard P basses the other day. On was nice, the other had sharp fret ends, nut was filed too low and just overall poor fit and finish.

I'd no idea Fender's QC had gone so bad. Good thing mine is as old as me.

Try Spectre, Sandberg and Yamaha. They've got some really nice high end options and sound like just what you're after. I'd certainly recommend giving Warwick another look too, they had a few years with lighter neck profiles IIRC.
#9
Try Spectre, Sandberg and Yamaha. They've got some really nice high end options and sound like just what you're after. I'd certainly recommend giving Warwick another look too, they had a few years with lighter neck profiles IIRC.


Wish I could get my hands on any of those. Tried out Warwick Rockbass and hated it. The only Yamaha's around are low end and just feel cheap.
The search continues.
#10
Quote by Spaz91
I'd no idea Fender's QC had gone so bad. Good thing mine is as old as me.

Fender American Standard line for all their instruments are a bit screwy since they're now a random mix of MiM and MiA parts.

Also QC is split between Ensenada and Corona so buying a AmStd for all instruments is a crap shoot.


The only American lines not affected by this is the American Deluxe and American Vintage which all are Custom Shop inspected.
Damn it! Disable can't use disable to disable Disable's disable because disable's disable has already been disabled by Disable's disable!
#11
That's shit. Surley Fender make enough money to avoid cutting corners like that.

@TS I think your best option will be the semi custom side of things like Carvin or Sandberg so you can control the neck dimensions and weight without forking out for a full custom shop job. G&L would be great too but I doubt they have any 24 feet options.