#1
Does anyone else feel like they have just hit a barrier in their playing and that they can't seem to improve on it? I feel like I have. I don't mean that I can't possibly get better than I am, but I mean that I am stuck at a certain level of skill and I just can't get past it, I still can't play Hendrix or SRV, but I am not awful either, I just can't seem to get improve on my playing, and it is annoying me. If anyone else feels the same way, or there is someone that has experienced and overcome this, please comment.

P.S:
Don't say "practice" because I already practice daily for quite a while. However, if you have got help or information that could improve my practice sessions, that could help.
#2
You've plateaued. Happens in every human endeavor. I've done the same in various things, including guitar.

I'd suggest trying something different for awhile. Leave Hendricks and SRV on the back burner and play just for the enjoyment of playing, not for any specific goal of improvement. Maybe go pick up an acoustic and try fingerstyle for awhile! Warning: fingerstyle is addictive.
#3
I have been playing fingerstyle lately, but more in the vein of Knopfler so I am not really bridging out hahaha.
#4
Try to learn to play like Tim Collis
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
#6
I'm deadly serious. If you're a) interested in fingerpicking and b) feel you're stuck on a plateau, forcing yourself to learn even one of his works will boost your skills considerably and open new doors for you. It's not as difficult as it looks. If you want something less influenced by midwestern emo you could check out Andy McKee; he's usually worshipped for his tasteless 'folk' pieces.

you could also try something really stripped back like Dylan Carlson's later work (Earth - Hex, Drcarlsonalbion - GOLD etc). Much more challenging when it comes to keeping time.
Quote by EndTheRapture51
who pays five hundred fucking dollars for a burger
#7
changing things up can help you get out of a rut. progress will at times seem to stop but it's just moving very slowly. sometimes taking a week off can help. when you come back you're more excited to play. you can't expect constant noticable improvement.

believe me i've been playing for over well 30 years and i can't see any major improvements either (and for the record i can't play like SRV or Jimi either although i can play a few of their songs) .
#8
Quote by Banjocal
Try to learn to play like Tim Collis


If he wants to beat on an instrument he'll buy drums!

Never heard of the guy until I saw your message earlier.
#9
You can get out of a rut/plateau by challenging yourself. Find something you like just above your skill level and work at it. For example - I've recently been working on Tony Rice's "Last thing on my mind", but as as a thumb-fingerbrush to emulate his 'grasser style flatpicking. What has happened is that the muscle memory skills acquired from that have transferred themselves to other songs and techniques, so I've just raised my plateau a bit higher. In my case it mostly works better to try new techniques on songs I know rather than try and learn a new song and a new technique at the same time. - That can all get a bit too much.
#10
[P.S:
Don't say "practice" because I already practice daily for quite a while. However, if you have got help or information that could improve my practice sessions, that could help.


do you use any melodic patterns-there are several hundred of them--try one a day!..and once you integrate them in your playing new ideas - and energy/inspiration will happen..

ideas for using them..try them in keys you like..then try them in a couple of keys your not familiar with..

play them in several positions..not just the area of the fretboard where you feel comfortable..the goal it to feel comfortable in ALL areas of the fretboard..

hope this helps
play well

wolf
#11
Find songs that you love to listen to and try to learn them. If I had to play music that I didn't listen to and enjoy playing guitar would be a drag.
ESP Iron Cross Sig model, Fernandes RetroRocket Sunburst, Taylor 214CE, Peavey XXX Super 40, DimeBag Crybaby from Hell, Zakk Wylde Overdrive, MXR Chorus, and a Flashback Delay and Looper.
#12
Plateaus are broken with hard work. Find something you can't do, that you want to do, and figure out how to do that.

If it is too far out of your grasp figure out the first step to work towards it.

If you want tailor made step by step instructions on what to practice next, then you want a good teacher.
#13
Quote by ryan.shawbinns


P.S:
Don't say "practice" because I already practice daily for quite a while. However, if you have got help or information that could improve my practice sessions, that could help.


Don't say "practice"?... That's the only thing people should recommending here and it's the only thing really hindering your progress, aside from any natural talent deficiencies you might have, which are exceedingly rare.

Practicing every day doesn't mean anything if you're just tinkering for 30 minutes or even an hour at a time. In order to be a great guitar player, you need to practice at least 2 hours per day or more for at least a few years - do that and you'll be playing some SRV in a year, maybe less. You really need to put in serious steady time to excel at guitar.

People like SRV and Hendrix would practice insane amounts of hours.

Also, practicing well means repeating the same three note lick for 10 hours if that's what it takes to get it down.

The good news is that if you can find the time, you'll be improving very quickly and that amelioration is cumulative. Things get funner the better you get.