#1
Been playing for about two years now, I just don't know what to learn in order to get better.

Chords/Strumming: Fairly good at, don't have a problem with most chords (including power and barre chords)or strumming patterns, just takes a while to adjust if they're new, I really only have two problems so far, one being that I can't find the chords, or the chords shown don't sound like the song, and that when I play barre chords standing up, where my hand will be bent, my wrist and my thumb will hurt a ton, if you've ever fallen and let the wrists take the hit, making it hurt when you bend them, it sorta feels like that.

Fingerstyle: Don't know much about, I can play Sound of Silence without a tab, and Scarborough Fair with a tab, still don't have everything from that on my brain. Was wondering what other songs/techniques I should learn to get better.

Picking/soloing: I think I'm pretty good compared to the time I've been playing, hardest songs in my opinion, would be the intro solo to The Thrill is Gone, and Bankshot by Operation Ivy, and the intro to Thunderstruck, if I play it on the e string, or if the e string is completely gone.

Slide guitar: Was told that once I've learned Dallas from Johnny Winter, I'd be a pretty good slide guitar player, still don't know Dallas from Johnny Winter, any tips on some songs I should learn beforehand? So far I only really know Seven Nation Army, used to know the solo, but can't remember it any longer.

So far I've been completely selftaught, I just don't know what to play any longer, everything either seems too hard or too easy, would really appreciate the help, if you've got a link to a tab or a lesson, please put it in a reply.
#2
The standard answer would be that you should start learning music by ear. Ear training in general is very useful and will improve your musicianship in a lot of ways, it'll help when you're learning new songs, when you're improvising, when you're composing etc etc. So, just start learning music you like by ear, start with easier, slower songs and preferably with melodies/single note lines, and work your way up and eventually you can recognize chords by ear and learn even difficult songs without any outside help. Also, ear training will help with the problem you stated in the first paragraph: chords that don't seem to sound right. With good ears, you can find the right chords without even looking at a sheet. That might take some time though.

If you're interested in theory, start with the names of the notes and basic interval theory. Even that will help you understand certain things a lot better.

And the best way to practice is to learn new songs. So instead of pointing you at lessons that use those techniques, I could recommend some songs you might or might not like.

Chords/strumming: almost any pop, country or folk song out there. Just play stuff you enjoy, I'm sure you like some music that's played with chords. (this answer is kind of a cheat, but it's true)

Fingerstyle: Bob Dylan is one that comes to mind, great fingerstyle stuff there. You could also arpeggiate a lot of songs that use strumming to use them for fingerstyle practice. (it's also creative!)

Picking/soloing: Living After Midnight by Judas Priest has a nice, easy solo that you could look into. Smoke on the Water is a bit trickier, but it's a cool and pretty manageable solo anyway. Slash has some cool stuff that isn't too hard either.

Slide guitar: I don't know a lot about this, but "Even Less" by Porcupine Tree has an amazing slide intro.

Extra points if you learn this stuff by ear. It's kind of a crappy list, but maybe you'll find something useful here.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#3
I could only answer this in a way I would deem satisfactory if I was in a teaching role, giving you personal first hand attention. The first thing I would have you do, is tell me what kind of player you want to be, what you want to be able to do, then I would ask you questions to find exactly what you can do, what you know, and I'd give you what I believe to be the best next step for you.

What you are facing now, is what is difficult of being self taught. It is tough to know what serves what purpose, and what you will get out of what. You will come across a lot of opinions. Then you will learn things, perhaps not the best ones for you at the time, and you'll only figure that out later, maybe, if you learn something and think to yourself "man, I wish I had learned that earlier".

That's the deal with being self taught. It can and often is done. I am self taught. But it generally is not learning things in the best order and most efficient way possible.

All you can really do is look at what you want to do, and try and figure out what to learn in order to be able to do that, or, just look at theory and resources like that, and pick some thing, learn that, and then see whether it helped you get to where you are going or not.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Oct 5, 2015,
#4
Quote by majskanoner
Been playing for about two years now, I just don't know what to learn in order to get better.

Chords/Strumming: Fairly good at, don't have a problem with most chords (including power and barre chords)or strumming patterns, just takes a while to adjust if they're new, I really only have two problems so far, one being that I can't find the chords, or the chords shown don't sound like the song,
That could be for a few reasons (assuming you are playing the chords you've found correctly!)
1. The original could be tuned down a half-step (very common in rock). So if it's says an "E" chord, it will actually sound like an Eb chord. So either you need to find an Eb chord shape, or tune your guitar down to match.
2. The original could be played with a capo. In that case you need to know which fret the capo was on. E.g., an "E" shape played with a capo on fret 3 will sound like a G.
3. The chord chart you found is simply wrong! (BREAKING NEWS: not all info on the internet is totally reliable!! SHOCK! )
Quote by majskanoner

and that when I play barre chords standing up, where my hand will be bent, my wrist and my thumb will hurt a ton, if you've ever fallen and let the wrists take the hit, making it hurt when you bend them, it sorta feels like that.
The shape and position of your hand should be no different when standing up.
This is really important. Set your strap so your guitar is in the same position relative to your body as when sitting. If you really want to let the body of the guitar hang a little lower, bring the neck up at more of an angle.
Let your wrist angle govern the angle and position of the guitar. Not whatever position looks cool in the mirror.

(As your hands get more stronger and more flexible with practice, you will be able to vary your positions without too much trouble.)
Quote by majskanoner

Fingerstyle: Don't know much about, I can play Sound of Silence without a tab, and Scarborough Fair with a tab, still don't have everything from that on my brain. Was wondering what other songs/techniques I should learn to get better.
Plenty of other Paul Simon songs, if you like his stuff. His first solo album (Songbook) has lots of good ones.
A couple of Dylan ones from the same era: Don't Think Twice, and Girl from the North Country (Freewheelin') album.
If you want to go back to older folk-blues artists, try Mississippi John Hurt, and country players like Doc Watson, Chet Atkins, or Merle Travis.
Going forward from there, Lindsey Buckingham did some good songs with Fleetwood Mac, in that alternating bass style (eg Landslide, Never Going Back).
Dust in the Wind by Kansas is another rock classic in that style.
Jimmy Page also did a few with Led Zep, but often in different tunings, so watch out for that.
Quote by majskanoner

Picking/soloing: I think I'm pretty good compared to the time I've been playing, hardest songs in my opinion, would be the intro solo to The Thrill is Gone, and Bankshot by Operation Ivy, and the intro to Thunderstruck, if I play it on the e string, or if the e string is completely gone.
Learning to improvise takes years, and being able to copy solos from records is a tiny part of that process. You need to not just be able to play the same notes, but understand why those notes were chosen - i.e., how they fit the chords, and how they suit the style of the song.
IOW, it's about the underlying principles, which are similar to those of composition. You have to be able to make it up yourself, and it doesn't come from nowhere, it comes from an understanding of the rules: the formulas, the idioms, the common practices. The vocabulary of the language.
Learn your fretboard thoroughly, and work on your ear (by trying to play along with anything you can).
Use theory as a way of helping make sense of what you're hearing, and not as a set of systems or patterns to apply. Sounds first, theory later!
Quote by majskanoner

Slide guitar: Was told that once I've learned Dallas from Johnny Winter, I'd be a pretty good slide guitar player, still don't know Dallas from Johnny Winter, any tips on some songs I should learn beforehand? So far I only really know Seven Nation Army, used to know the solo, but can't remember it any longer.
Don't believe everything you're told! (Including this post )
Nothing against Johnny Winter, but why not go back to those he took it from?
Ry Cooder might tell you "once you've learned Dark Was The Night by Blind WIllie Johnson, you'd be a pretty good slide guitar player."
I'd tend to trust Ry:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DB7C7BgxEWw
Then there was Muddy Waters, Bukka White, Son House and Elmore James:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oSF-T5gwdxU
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pkhj9z14TBo
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdgrQoZHnNY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nBA2REoRD98
(Of course, there's so much more to all those than just the guitar playing!!! That may be the best lesson....)
#5
Been holding off of this thread for a while because my wrist hasn't gotten any better, hasn't gotten any worse, but it still hurts, it's only when my wrist is angled though, so I shouldn't be playing any barre chords, and certain power chords, all I know for sure anyways. If anyone knows why it hurts, then it'd be sweet if you could tell me,I just know that when it started hurting, I was playing barre chords standing up, meaning that my wrist was in a weirder position than it was when I was sitting down. Checking with a doctor next week, although I'd rather not tbh. And I've gotten an assignment in school, I'm starting Sweden's equivalent of college next year, Gymnasium, picking music meaning that I need a theory test, and a physical test, so I'll be mainly playing Scarborough fair until I can play that with flow, and eventually something else, probably an easy song just to show that I can sing whilst playing guitar.
Last edited by majskanoner at Oct 9, 2015,
#6
Quote by majskanoner
Been holding off of this thread for a while because my wrist hasn't gotten any better, hasn't gotten any worse, but it still hurts, it's only when my wrist is angled though, so I shouldn't be playing any barre chords, and certain power chords, all I know for sure anyways.
Wrong. You should be playing barre chords and power chords with a straighter wrist.
Quote by majskanoner

If anyone knows why it hurts, then it'd be sweet if you could tell me,I just know that when it started hurting, I was playing barre chords standing up, meaning that my wrist was in a weirder position than it was when I was sitting down.
I guess you didn't read all my previous post? (I don't blame you, it was a bit long....)

Here's the relevant section:

The shape and position of your hand should be no different when standing up.
This is really important. Set your strap so your guitar is in the same position relative to your body as when sitting. If you really want to let the body of the guitar hang a little lower, bring the neck up at more of an angle.
Let your wrist angle govern the angle and position of the guitar. Not whatever position looks cool in the mirror.
#7
Quote by Kevätuhri
The standard answer would be that you should start learning music by ear. Ear training in general is very useful and will improve your musicianship in a lot of ways, it'll help when you're learning new songs, when you're improvising, when you're composing etc etc. So, just start learning music you like by ear, start with easier, slower songs and preferably with melodies/single note lines, and work your way up and eventually you can recognize chords by ear and learn even difficult songs without any outside help. Also, ear training will help with the problem you stated in the first paragraph: chords that don't seem to sound right. With good ears, you can find the right chords without even looking at a sheet. That might take some time though.

If you're interested in theory, start with the names of the notes and basic interval theory. Even that will help you understand certain things a lot better.

And the best way to practice is to learn new songs. So instead of pointing you at lessons that use those techniques, I could recommend some songs you might or might not like.

Chords/strumming: almost any pop, country or folk song out there. Just play stuff you enjoy, I'm sure you like some music that's played with chords. (this answer is kind of a cheat, but it's true)

Fingerstyle: Bob Dylan is one that comes to mind, great fingerstyle stuff there. You could also arpeggiate a lot of songs that use strumming to use them for fingerstyle practice. (it's also creative!)

Picking/soloing: Living After Midnight by Judas Priest has a nice, easy solo that you could look into. Smoke on the Water is a bit trickier, but it's a cool and pretty manageable solo anyway. Slash has some cool stuff that isn't too hard either.

Slide guitar: I don't know a lot about this, but "Even Less" by Porcupine Tree has an amazing slide intro.

Extra points if you learn this stuff by ear. It's kind of a crappy list, but maybe you'll find something useful here.


I'll start looking into learning by ear then, always wanted to do it but didn't know how high up it was on the scale of difficulty when it came to guitar.

When it comes to theory, would you advise learning it before I go to "college" or after? Because here, when you have the test, the theory test is mainly there to check if you know about notes and stuff like that, and then they put you in one of two groups, being the ones who don't know notes and that stuff, and the ones who do know notes and that stuff, whereas the physical/technical test is just there to check how proficient you are.

Go ahead and send the songs, as long as it isn't some ridiculous metal (Cannibal Corpse and such, although I can't really go harder than Pantera), or some modern pop dubstep thing, I'll probably like the songs, I listen to practically everything before 2000, not because I'm a "wrong generation" kid, but because most people who play older genres tend to disappear into the void, I could link my spotify playlist if you want to.

There are a lot of songs with chords that I like, I like generally anything with a good guitar in it except for Swedish folk music. And I don't think the answer was a cheat, it was barely a question to begin with. Honestly I just wanna know if there were some techniques when it came to strumming that I should know about.

I'll check out some arpeggio techniques then, I love Bob Dylan, but I'm kind of clearing through my old spotify list to make a new one, so my main focus is that, while most of Bob Dylans more famous songs are played with chords. Plus there is the problem that famous songs like Take me home country roads which have fingerplaying, basically never have the fingerplaying tab, but instead chords so that people who can't really play, can play their favorite songs, which is good and all, but what about the more experienced ones?

Living after midnight and Smoke on the water seem easy enough, though I should probably listen to the songs before attempting them, Slash having some cool stuff, do you mean his solo career or GNR, or both? Will definitely check some songs out though, love Slash.

Will definitely check out that song, already listened to some Porcupine Tree, stupid name, but pretty good stuff. And, I won't learn any of this by ear, not yet anyways, I imagine it'll be good to learn how to tune to standard tuning by ear first. Thanks!
#8
Quote by jongtr
Wrong. You should be playing barre chords and power chords with a straighter wrist.
I guess you didn't read all my previous post? (I don't blame you, it was a bit long....)

Here's the relevant section:

The shape and position of your hand should be no different when standing up.
This is really important. Set your strap so your guitar is in the same position relative to your body as when sitting. If you really want to let the body of the guitar hang a little lower, bring the neck up at more of an angle.
Let your wrist angle govern the angle and position of the guitar. Not whatever position looks cool in the mirror.

Honestly, I just hadn't gotten to your post yet, I'll be reading it shortly though! And yeah, I know I should be learning to play barre and power chords with a straighter wrist, but I'd rather get rid of the wrist pain before that.
#9
Quote by fingrpikingood
I could only answer this in a way I would deem satisfactory if I was in a teaching role, giving you personal first hand attention. The first thing I would have you do, is tell me what kind of player you want to be, what you want to be able to do, then I would ask you questions to find exactly what you can do, what you know, and I'd give you what I believe to be the best next step for you.

What you are facing now, is what is difficult of being self taught. It is tough to know what serves what purpose, and what you will get out of what. You will come across a lot of opinions. Then you will learn things, perhaps not the best ones for you at the time, and you'll only figure that out later, maybe, if you learn something and think to yourself "man, I wish I had learned that earlier".

That's the deal with being self taught. It can and often is done. I am self taught. But it generally is not learning things in the best order and most efficient way possible.

All you can really do is look at what you want to do, and try and figure out what to learn in order to be able to do that, or, just look at theory and resources like that, and pick some thing, learn that, and then see whether it helped you get to where you are going or not.

I'd love to be taught by someone, but there are practically only 3 ways to learn an instrument here, and two are just more like selfteaching aid, and the last one you need to start with early to get any use out of, or you know, join now, and get some use out of it after a couple of years. But what are some things you deem essential to know after say, 1 year of playing guitar?
#10
Gonna read jongtrs post now, been noodling around on the guitar whilst reading, does anyone know why my e string suddenly detuned while bending? I mean, I'm guessing it's the guitar and not the string, it's not a good guitar, but it hasn't happened to me before
Last edited by majskanoner at Oct 9, 2015,
#11
Quote by jongtr
That could be for a few reasons (assuming you are playing the chords you've found correctly!)
1. The original could be tuned down a half-step (very common in rock). So if it's says an "E" chord, it will actually sound like an Eb chord. So either you need to find an Eb chord shape, or tune your guitar down to match.
2. The original could be played with a capo. In that case you need to know which fret the capo was on. E.g., an "E" shape played with a capo on fret 3 will sound like a G.
3. The chord chart you found is simply wrong! (BREAKING NEWS: not all info on the internet is totally reliable!! SHOCK! )
The shape and position of your hand should be no different when standing up.
This is really important. Set your strap so your guitar is in the same position relative to your body as when sitting. If you really want to let the body of the guitar hang a little lower, bring the neck up at more of an angle.
Let your wrist angle govern the angle and position of the guitar. Not whatever position looks cool in the mirror.

(As your hands get more stronger and more flexible with practice, you will be able to vary your positions without too much trouble.)
Plenty of other Paul Simon songs, if you like his stuff. His first solo album (Songbook) has lots of good ones.
A couple of Dylan ones from the same era: Don't Think Twice, and Girl from the North Country (Freewheelin') album.
If you want to go back to older folk-blues artists, try Mississippi John Hurt, and country players like Doc Watson, Chet Atkins, or Merle Travis.
Going forward from there, Lindsey Buckingham did some good songs with Fleetwood Mac, in that alternating bass style (eg Landslide, Never Going Back).
Dust in the Wind by Kansas is another rock classic in that style.
Jimmy Page also did a few with Led Zep, but often in different tunings, so watch out for that.
Learning to improvise takes years, and being able to copy solos from records is a tiny part of that process. You need to not just be able to play the same notes, but understand why those notes were chosen - i.e., how they fit the chords, and how they suit the style of the song.
IOW, it's about the underlying principles, which are similar to those of composition. You have to be able to make it up yourself, and it doesn't come from nowhere, it comes from an understanding of the rules: the formulas, the idioms, the common practices. The vocabulary of the language.
Learn your fretboard thoroughly, and work on your ear (by trying to play along with anything you can).
Use theory as a way of helping make sense of what you're hearing, and not as a set of systems or patterns to apply. Sounds first, theory later!
Don't believe everything you're told! (Including this post )
Nothing against Johnny Winter, but why not go back to those he took it from?
Ry Cooder might tell you "once you've learned Dark Was The Night by Blind WIllie Johnson, you'd be a pretty good slide guitar player."
I'd tend to trust Ry.
(Of course, there's so much more to all those than just the guitar playing!!! That may be the best lesson....)

1. You know, that may be the case in some songs where no one's specified what tuning it is, but look at http://tabs.ultimate-guitar.com/s/supergrass/caught_by_the_fuzz_ver2_crd.htm it has a part where it's just A and G a couple of times, and it's probably A and G, but it's not the standard positions.

2. Again, could be the case that it isn't specified, but I'd probably be able to tell if he was using a capo in the song, not what fret however.

3. Also definitely possible, although I know chords like A and G by heart now, and it's definitely not those specific chords in the song.

Thanks for the tip about having the guitar at the same height it would be when sitting down, it helps a bit at least, wrist still hurts though, and it's kind of tedious tbh, but I'll have it the way it is at the moment in hopes that I'll be able to lower it with time and practice.

Made a new playlist on spotify now thanks to you, where I'm gonna put all the songs I should try to learn, either just for fun, or just to get better.

Believe it or not, I can improvise a tiny bit, it's restricted to pentatonic scales, but it's better than nothing. Asked Kevätuhri about theory as well, I'm gonna major in music, I guess, but you don't really need to know theory to get in the "college", you just need to be good with an instrument, of course knowing theory is a plus, but if you don't know it they'll teach you and you'll be in a group with people who don't know theory either. I could either attempt learning theory and probably be in a group with less people, which is something I don't want, and it might be a waste of time because I might not be able to understand it anyways, or I could just keep on learning how to play, and get in a group that probably has more people, and I'd probably definitely learn about theory. Meaning that I'd learn about it, but it's not certain that I'd get it. Probably just gonna check with my teacher and check which one has more people in it, I need more musician friends.

And I'll try to learn Dark was the night, cold was the ground instead then, added the other songs to the playlist, and of course there's more than guitar to the songs, probably the first lesson I learned when I began playing guitar, because I didn't just hear the songs as songs, but I paid attention to the different instruments, I used to think the bass was just give or take, can't say I agree with that anymore, thanks for the tips! Cut out the songs, because it made the post unnecessarily long
Last edited by majskanoner at Oct 9, 2015,
#12
Quote by majskanoner
I'll start looking into learning by ear then, always wanted to do it but didn't know how high up it was on the scale of difficulty when it came to guitar.


Well, it depends. Some people are naturals at it, some struggle with ear training for years and years. But you can't start it too early, I'd say most people are capable of learning songs by ear after a couple of years, so go ahead and try.

Quote by majskanoner

When it comes to theory, would you advise learning it before I go to "college" or after? Because here, when you have the test, the theory test is mainly there to check if you know about notes and stuff like that, and then they put you in one of two groups, being the ones who don't know notes and that stuff, and the ones who do know notes and that stuff, whereas the physical/technical test is just there to check how proficient you are.


I'd say start learning it now I'd rather be in the group that knows their stuff.

Quote by majskanoner

Go ahead and send the songs, as long as it isn't some ridiculous metal (Cannibal Corpse and such, although I can't really go harder than Pantera), or some modern pop dubstep thing, I'll probably like the songs, I listen to practically everything before 2000, not because I'm a "wrong generation" kid, but because most people who play older genres tend to disappear into the void, I could link my spotify playlist if you want to.

There are a lot of songs with chords that I like, I like generally anything with a good guitar in it except for Swedish folk music. And I don't think the answer was a cheat, it was barely a question to begin with. Honestly I just wanna know if there were some techniques when it came to strumming that I should know about.

I'll check out some arpeggio techniques then, I love Bob Dylan, but I'm kind of clearing through my old spotify list to make a new one, so my main focus is that, while most of Bob Dylans more famous songs are played with chords. Plus there is the problem that famous songs like Take me home country roads which have fingerplaying, basically never have the fingerplaying tab, but instead chords so that people who can't really play, can play their favorite songs, which is good and all, but what about the more experienced ones?



Yeah, I can only recommend songs that I like, and you should be playing songs that you like. So learn your favourite stuff. And we seem to be in different camps musically anyway, I'm one of those apparently weird people that like post-2000 music.

Strumming is about patterns and rhythm. Just hitting the strings up and down randomly is of course not advised. Just studying some classic songs and guitarists you like can give you insight on what kind of patterns you could use and how they fit in a song. I'd suggest looking up some well reviewed video lessons on strumming; it's pretty hard (for me at least) to explain via text.

And if you like Bob Dylan, great, he's an endless source of inspiration in strumming and fingerpicking. And again, by training your ear you'll never run into problems like "I can't find a proper tab" or the like. You could experiment a little here, and see what kind of fingerpicked and arpeggiated patterns you can come up with without a tab, only looking at the chords.

Quote by majskanoner


Living after midnight and Smoke on the water seem easy enough, though I should probably listen to the songs before attempting them, Slash having some cool stuff, do you mean his solo career or GNR, or both? Will definitely check some songs out though, love Slash.

Will definitely check out that song, already listened to some Porcupine Tree, stupid name, but pretty good stuff. And, I won't learn any of this by ear, not yet anyways, I imagine it'll be good to learn how to tune to standard tuning by ear first. Thanks!


Both GNR and Slash's solo stuff have cool and approachable guitar work. And yep, always listen well before playing something, listening is by far the more important skill when learning new material.

And Porcupine Tree is like the best band ever so by all means look up their stuff. They have a lot of songs for strumming and fingerpicking practice as well.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#13
Quote by majskanoner
I'd love to be taught by someone, but there are practically only 3 ways to learn an instrument here, and two are just more like selfteaching aid, and the last one you need to start with early to get any use out of, or you know, join now, and get some use out of it after a couple of years. But what are some things you deem essential to know after say, 1 year of playing guitar?


I don't look at it as years. I look at it as a specific person, what their strengths and weaknesses are, what sort of player they want to be, and sort of player they are.

Then you figure out the next thing that makes sense for them to learn, and show them that, and anything that comes to mind when you watch them try.

I don't know what you're talking about "only 3 ways".

What I do know is, I can see the future, and you can't. What I mean by that, is that I know what sort of things will be useful for what sort of things, and what might be worth putting some effort into now, in order to pay off big, instead of just thinking of now.

Kind of like if you give a man a fish you feed him for a day, but if you teach him to fish you feed him for life. You can learn a song and know a song, or you can learn music.
Last edited by fingrpikingood at Oct 9, 2015,
#14
Kevähturi: By saying that I basically don't like anything from 2000, I mean that I basically don't like any of the popular bands or genres from 2000, there are still a handful of good bands out there, but not as popular because, well, it isn't pop music anymore
#15
Fingrpikingood: The music school here has entire classes, as in if I start guitar, I'll be with a bunch of kids most likely and be forced to learn stuff I already know, that's what I think anyways, and I probably won't get in because like I said, the list is loooong. Only other 2 ways are to either pay for 10 weeks, 45, 30 or 20 minutes, where you get to learn whatever you want when it comes to music, provided that the dude knows it, or you have to teach yourself. Now, 45 minutes is pretty good, but it's small compared to a week, so if I do that, which I will, I'll still have to teach myself mainly. And of course, I'd prefer to learn how to play music instead of just a song, but in selfteaching, that takes a while, because you have to pick out a song, and you'll learn certain techniques the hard way.
#16
Quote by majskanoner
Fingrpikingood: The music school here has entire classes, as in if I start guitar, I'll be with a bunch of kids most likely and be forced to learn stuff I already know, that's what I think anyways, and I probably won't get in because like I said, the list is loooong. Only other 2 ways are to either pay for 10 weeks, 45, 30 or 20 minutes, where you get to learn whatever you want when it comes to music, provided that the dude knows it, or you have to teach yourself. Now, 45 minutes is pretty good, but it's small compared to a week, so if I do that, which I will, I'll still have to teach myself mainly. And of course, I'd prefer to learn how to play music instead of just a song, but in selfteaching, that takes a while, because you have to pick out a song, and you'll learn certain techniques the hard way.


Oh, I see what you mean. If you get a good teacher, 45 minutes will be plenty, and you won't be teaching yourself. The first lesson will be a bit different becasue they will need to get to know you, but 45 minutes can actually be a lot.

What you want in lessons is to meet the guy for him to look at what you're doing, maybe fix a couple things, guide you, and just give you stuff to practice.

You will have to practice, no matter what. A lot, if you want to get very good. That's where the real advancement will come from. But the value of the teacher will come from guiding you and finding the best things for you to do to advance the most quickly. Little excercises you can do. Some cool licks here and there maybe also. Songs of the right level that demonstrate the things he is teaching you, and the things you should learn in the right order.

I believe the best learning is done with a guitar in your hands. In a classroom you can learn some things for sure, but hours on end in a classroom, if what you want to do is play, I don't find is necessarily the best. If you learn on your own, you can spend a long time learning something that's not that important to you, or you figure out your technique just needed to change, and you would have improved instead of hours and hours of little improvement. Or you might discover something and hate yourself because that could have been so useful to you years ago even. These are the things a private teacher should be there for, imo. Not to make you better at guitar while you are in the lesson with them, but to layout your plan so you can go out and work at it, and have a good logical coherent path to follow to get to where you want to go.
#17
Quote by fingrpikingood
Oh, I see what you mean. If you get a good teacher, 45 minutes will be plenty, and you won't be teaching yourself. The first lesson will be a bit different becasue they will need to get to know you, but 45 minutes can actually be a lot.

What you want in lessons is to meet the guy for him to look at what you're doing, maybe fix a couple things, guide you, and just give you stuff to practice.

You will have to practice, no matter what. A lot, if you want to get very good. That's where the real advancement will come from. But the value of the teacher will come from guiding you and finding the best things for you to do to advance the most quickly. Little excercises you can do. Some cool licks here and there maybe also. Songs of the right level that demonstrate the things he is teaching you, and the things you should learn in the right order.

I believe the best learning is done with a guitar in your hands. In a classroom you can learn some things for sure, but hours on end in a classroom, if what you want to do is play, I don't find is necessarily the best. If you learn on your own, you can spend a long time learning something that's not that important to you, or you figure out your technique just needed to change, and you would have improved instead of hours and hours of little improvement. Or you might discover something and hate yourself because that could have been so useful to you years ago even. These are the things a private teacher should be there for, imo. Not to make you better at guitar while you are in the lesson with them, but to layout your plan so you can go out and work at it, and have a good logical coherent path to follow to get to where you want to go.

I mean, I'm gonna begin with the 20 minute one, to find out if it's a good teacher. It's a one time payment for 10 weeks so it's a good deal IMO. But, I haven't started yet, and this only makes me even more sure of it, so I'm gonna check it out, thanks!