#1
Been interested in an electric/acoustic nylon string. I have been using a slightly de-tuned tenor ukulele with a solid spruce top and built-in Fishman electronics and it sounds exquisite. I like to take it a step further.

I've tried cheap classical acoustic electrics Ibanez and Washburn. In the $300 range. I don't know if Segovia would like them but I thought they sounded great.

Very expressive and dynamic doing single string solos.

The problem with them was the string balance, volume wise was not equal. In other words when you plug them in and record some of the strings were much louder, not a little, a lot.

The Ibanez I sent it back got another one and it did the same thing. The Washburn did it too, after I expressly told Sweetwater to make sure the strings were balanced.

I had another problem with them also. They made my fingers sore , the joints. My steel string electric guitars don't do that. I don't know why, they say the nylon is easier to play but not for me.

So maybe a baritone ukulele with Fishman electronics. Or perhaps, an electric acoustic nylon string guitar that plays exceptionally easy if there is such a thing.

Flamenco? Django Reinhardt gypsy jazz style guitar, what's the difference between them and a regular classical guitar.

Thank you for your patience.
#2
Traditional flamenco guitars are more lightly built than classical guitars, and tiny bit smaller, the action is lower and they have golpeadors to protect the top when tapping. They are designed for a loud, brash, percussive style of playing. In inexpensive guitars, the differences may be purely cosmetic. Jazz nylon string guitars usually have a cutaway and might have a slightly radiused fretboard. Traditional gypsy jazz is usually associated with Selmer - Maccaferri steel string guitars, but these were very lightly strung.

The Cordoba Fusion series might suit you, they are a jazz type guitar, and I liked the one I tried. - Cedar top, lam EIR b&s.
#3
Gypsy guitars are a completely different design, as mentioned above, and are incredibly easy to play if you're flatpicking.

Classical and Flamenco guitars are a different design. regardless of how much your budget is , stay away from Ibanez and Washburn - they suck at making these types of guitars - to be blunt. Under $500 you should aim for a Yamaha or a La Patrie ( Godin) - those are the best I've played in that range. I can't speak for Cordoba's, but they seem ok. Your fingers were probably sore because those guitars had a bad setup, which is typical from Washburn and Ibanez in that price range. A well setup Classical guitar plays like butter, though the neck is larger than a typical steel string guitar and requires some getting used to.
#4
Flamenco are really fun guitars. Whether to choose between them or a classical is a matter of personal preference.
Classical guitars have an "easy to play" reputation but you still need good action due to the larger diameter of the lower strings. They typically have flat fretboards which is an advantage if you're a really skilled player, for a novice takes a little getting used to.
You should have some kind of equalizer in the electronics to balance ranges so the strings sound relationally appropriate (you're probably experiencing less projection from the lower strings).
#5
Quote by skido13
Flamenco are really fun guitars. Whether to choose between them or a classical is a matter of personal preference.
Classical guitars have an "easy to play" reputation but you still need good action due to the larger diameter of the lower strings. They typically have flat fretboards which is an advantage if you're a really skilled player, for a novice takes a little getting used to.
You should have some kind of equalizer in the electronics to balance ranges so the strings sound relationally appropriate (you're probably experiencing less projection from the lower strings).


Poorly made guitars have bad balance and the Eq won't really save that - if you set your eq controls flat and the guitar is wildly unbalanced, then it's a bad guitar. I'm not surprised the Washburn and Ibanez cheaper models suffer from this issue.

OP - judge the tone unplugged and plugged - set the amp ( make sure it's a good amp!) flat and set the eq controls flat - if it sounds decent then your good. Minor adjustments on eq are ok but anything drastic is a sign of a problem guitar.
#6
Thanks for your help. Yes, gypsy jazz guitar sounds right up my alley. The focus would be mainly on doing solos, recording not playing live.

I will check some of the recommendations out. I do not know if they will be in my price range. It seems like the gypsy jazz guitar is a pretty specialty item. Especially one with a high quality built-in pickup and preamp. We will see. Thanks again
#8
Quote by yope
Thanks for your help. Yes, gypsy jazz guitar sounds right up my alley. The focus would be mainly on doing solos, recording not playing live.

I will check some of the recommendations out. I do not know if they will be in my price range. It seems like the gypsy jazz guitar is a pretty specialty item. Especially one with a high quality built-in pickup and preamp. We will see. Thanks again


-the Gitane brand may interest you.

-string choice can help stabilize frequency response a bit. material, and gage can make a difference. experiment.

-UST (if equipped) fitment can also make a difference. the saddle needs to seat snuggly and cleanly in the pocket with complete uninterrupted contact to gain maximum benefit.
Last edited by ad_works at Oct 9, 2015,
#9
^^^^^Yes, some USTs are very sensitive to bridge and saddle contact. I've spent a lot of time trying to get them uniform, one way or another. There are a few different tricks that can be tried. These include increasing the saddle string break angle, shims, levelling the bottom of the slot and slotting the saddle to make it flexible.

The general trend among acoustic aficionados is away from USts to SBTs like the K&K Pure Western Mini, and mics.