#1
Hi. I have been playing guitar seriously for 1 year now, having stopped 10 months after 6 years of experience.

I am a metal guitarist, interested with melodies, and beautiful solos. My main influence include Death (Chuck Schuldiner), The Faceless, Paul Wardingham, Scar Symmetry, some Lamb of God... Jeff Loomis ... and mostly everything else that sounds totally beautiful and mysterious. - - I mean prog metal and the melodic instrumental music.

That being said. I can reproduce some solos of Death, by slowing down the music. And I create licks to ''patch up'' the passages I cannot play either because the phrasing on the CD is too sketchy or too difficult.

I want to get to the next level of playing. So I follow David Wallimann's video lessons, I bought Sam Bell's metal backing tracks package on Guitar Playback.com and I also bought Paul Wardingham's licks - - - but they seem too difficult even if I observe what the tabs mention.

Can you METALHEADS, relate to my experience ? Which direction should I take ? Notice that I took more than 25 lessons in my life and I have proper technique and guitar handling.

Should I transcribe Classic Rock solos ? and get back to the technical stuff after ? Please give me any suggestions. Thanks.
#2
Do you have proper technique, or do you THINK you have proper technique? These are 2 very different things. What I've learned through my 10-11 years of playing is that when you start to believe you have perfect technique, you stop getting better in that aspect. That mentality alone will set you up to never improve much, if at all.

Before I go any further, realize that I am not "good" in a technical aspect, but I can still give you tips. I just haven't put those tips into practice enough myself.

When you say those tabs are too difficult, I'm assuming you mean technically. The big thing that everyone here would stress is muscle memory. You couldn't run before you could walk, and this is no different. It is uncommon to be able to play something at your highest speed if you have only just looked at it. I say uncommon because it does happen. Just not very often. Keep that in mind. Don't let it float at the back of your head. Let it sink in.

That being said, transcribing solos for yourself is ALWAYS a good idea, but it's also good to focus on technique while doing so. It's almost pointless, from a technical aspect, to transcribe a solo. However, from a musical aspect, it's almost pointless to focus only on technique exercises. If you do focus on both equally, it'll turn out much better and take less time. That's not to say that you should focus on them both at the same time. You should just spend equal amounts of time on them varying by what you want to accomplish first. If you want to get really fast, you might want to spend more time on technique and less on aural skills and theory and vise-versa. However, most musicians, if not all musicians, will tell you that musicality is much, much more important. I agree with them. I'd rather hear someone play some beautiful, slow music that speaks to my soul than hear Yngwie Malmsteen run up and down the neck at the speed of light.
#3
Yes, I want to focus on technical aspect, as well as musicality. The main point is.... I just discovered a guy on youtube here : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmY8mwXgJnA

1 - - This guy plays better than my BEST guitar teacher....I had 4 guitar teachers all time.
2 - - This guy says on his profile that he is self-taught, and still has amazing soloing vocabulary.

3 - - By vocabulary, I mean, using different ACROBATICS and FINGERING, and MOVES
4 - - Musicality is more important to me. Theory is a tool to understand music.

But, seriously, what kind of stuff do one guitarist have to practice to end up like this guy ?

Adding to the fact, the last lesson I got, the teacher gave me 3 sheets of alternate picking from Troy Stetina, and asked me to review my F major scale...which is pointless because what I am looking for is vocabulary. The best advice he gave me was to play over a melodic rock backing track and get creative. That's the best advice. I actually improved today because of that.

I know how to jam over backing tracks with scale grids and graphs. To make my point, I would become way better in reproducing all the chops in this video I just posted, rather than reviewing my scales.
#5
Hello guys, okay ? Watch this video lesson on technique to play Heavy Metal and Rock, are two very cool videos , hope you enjoy and to subscribe to my channel and curtam the videos. Hug.
Video I
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=spmSs6xvdvk
http://www.4shared.com/office/0bUKZj2kba/Lick_1_-_2.html
Backing Track

Video II
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WrpJyOzL-Fo
www.4shared.com/office/2a-Cz8E0ce/Doc1.html
http://www.4shared.com/mp3/Q_VUEQOvce/-metal-licks_Backing_track.html
#6
Quote by zordan123
Hi. I have been playing guitar seriously for 1 year now, having stopped 10 months after 6 years of experience.

I am a metal guitarist, interested with melodies, and beautiful solos. My main influence include Death (Chuck Schuldiner), The Faceless, Paul Wardingham, Scar Symmetry, some Lamb of God... Jeff Loomis ... and mostly everything else that sounds totally beautiful and mysterious. - - I mean prog metal and the melodic instrumental music.

That being said. I can reproduce some solos of Death, by slowing down the music. And I create licks to ''patch up'' the passages I cannot play either because the phrasing on the CD is too sketchy or too difficult.

I want to get to the next level of playing. So I follow David Wallimann's video lessons, I bought Sam Bell's metal backing tracks package on Guitar Playback.com and I also bought Paul Wardingham's licks - - - but they seem too difficult even if I observe what the tabs mention.

Can you METALHEADS, relate to my experience ? Which direction should I take ? Notice that I took more than 25 lessons in my life and I have proper technique and guitar handling.

Should I transcribe Classic Rock solos ? and get back to the technical stuff after ? Please give me any suggestions. Thanks.


My advice is this - slow down! Start with slower metal and work your way up. Black Sabbath paranoid album for example ( that would be very slow). Iron maiden - Powerslave or Somewhere in Time albums are great beginner metal albums - they keep the pyrotechnics to a minimum but still have epic and very melodic solos. Adrian Smith's solos in Maiden have flawless phrasing that is very easy to hear - that is why he's a great study.