#1
so im 15, and a massive led zeppelin fan. ive been learning guitar since i were 7 so thats 8 years of experience (actually about 6 because i had a break for 2 years, i wish i hadnt) im pretty good with improvising in the style of stevie ray vaughan, who i also love dearly but my main interest is page. ive held of for a long time because hes one of the great rock gods i thought it would be too hard for me. i know he went along the c major scale and pentatonic i beleive, but i also wanna know some licks he used when improvising. everytime i look up 'jimmy page style licks' it just comes up with ones straight from stairway to heaven, every.single.time... thanks
#2
Just listen to his music a lot and learn to play his solos (preferably by ear). That's the best way. Use your ears.


C major or pentatonic is not going to give you Jimmy Page sound. You can't just pick a scale and start playing and expect it to sound like somebody. You need to play what fits the backing track. Jimmy Page would sound like Jimmy Page no matter what scale he was using. It's in the phrasing, not in the scales.


Also, I don't think Page's solos are that hard. Some of the early stuff is pretty fast. But there are many far more technical players than Page. If you have been playing for 6 years, I'm pretty sure you can play at least some Page stuff. And you said you can play SRV stuff. I haven't listened to him a lot, but I doubt Page is any more difficult than SRV.
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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Oct 9, 2015,
#3
SRV is way more difficult than Page

TS, I'd recommend figuring out some Page solos by ear. If you can think like him then you can play like him.

I'd recommend Whole Lotta Love. It's short, sweet and divided into nice call and response licks that will be easier to figure out one by one.

It's also one of his better solos imo
#5
Quote by molten oxide
so im 15, and a massive led zeppelin fan. ive been learning guitar since i were 7 so thats 8 years of experience (actually about 6 because i had a break for 2 years, i wish i hadnt) im pretty good with improvising in the style of stevie ray vaughan, who i also love dearly but my main interest is page. ive held of for a long time because hes one of the great rock gods i thought it would be too hard for me. i know he went along the c major scale and pentatonic i beleive, but i also wanna know some licks he used when improvising. everytime i look up 'jimmy page style licks' it just comes up with ones straight from stairway to heaven, every.single.time... thanks

A lot of led zeppelin songs grew out of improvisation. learn as many led zep songs as you can all the way through. I don't think there's much else to be done if you want to learn someone's style.
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#7
Quote by cdgraves
Learn the rhythm parts, too. Page's talent was much more in production and instrumentation than in playing solos.


Qft

Jimmy is one of my least favorite soloists. He's way better as a riff writer producer.


Ts if you want some really good blues rock stuff then get Live at the Filmore East by the Allman Brothers. Or Cream Live at the Royal Albert Hall.


Not to rain on your parade ir anything. If you like Jimmy the best then good for you. Either way, check that stuff out.
#8
Quote by Duaneclapdrix
SRV is way more difficult than Page


+1

if you can play like srv it should just be a matter of listening to led zep and getting the style into your head.
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#9
Quote by Dave_Mc
+1

if you can play like srv it should just be a matter of listening to led zep and getting the style into your head.


SRV is far more challenging, in terms of technique and "authenticity". It can be hard just to do his tunes justice, even if you know them note for note.

With Page, the challenge isn't playing Zeppelin tunes, but in wrapping your head around the way approached harmony and the guitar in general. SRV was a straight up guitarist, but Page, being a producer, used the guitar like a producer would normally use a keyboard. And he didn't shy away from unusual harmonic choices. He really ran the gamut from very tonal to very modal, and always with interesting texture.
#10
Quote by cdgraves
(a) SRV is far more challenging, in terms of technique and "authenticity". It can be hard just to do his tunes justice, even if you know them note for note.

(b) With Page, the challenge isn't playing Zeppelin tunes, but in wrapping your head around the way approached harmony and the guitar in general. SRV was a straight up guitarist, but Page, being a producer, used the guitar like a producer would normally use a keyboard. And he didn't shy away from unusual harmonic choices. He really ran the gamut from very tonal to very modal, and always with interesting texture.


(a) yeah definitely

(b) I've never really analysed zep much beyond trying to play the songs
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I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

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#11
Check out his playing on "The Rover" and "Since I've Been Loving You" and you'll snag some great licks.

While Page's playing was usually sloppy, and there are dozens of more technical guitarists, he almost always managed to capture the mood of the song with his solos --- to more or less reiterate what everyone else said he very much has a producer's ear.
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#12
Jimmy Page is one incredibly sloppy guitar player.

That being said, he's probably the only sloppy player I really enjoy listening to. The man's a legend.
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#13
Quote by Jet Penguin
Jimmy Page is one incredibly sloppy guitar player.

That being said, he's probably the only sloppy player I really enjoy listening to. The man's a legend.


I don't think it's really fair to call him sloppy. Live, yes (too much heroin) but in the studio he really nailed a lot of his solos. The only one I can think of that really stands out as sloppy is the middle section of Heartbreaker.
#14
Oh totally; I guess I mean sloppy more in the sense of "rambunctious and rough around the edges".

Like he's just very bold with his playing, the Page riffery is almost this separate magical thing, a distinct part from the rest of the tune that just 'pops out'.

Not to imply his playing doesn't serve the song, quite the opposite.
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#16
Quote by Beserker
I don't think it's really fair to call him sloppy. Live, yes (too much heroin) but in the studio he really nailed a lot of his solos. The only one I can think of that really stands out as sloppy is the middle section of Heartbreaker.


Anything he composed ahead of time he played well, but a lot of his improv was a slopfest. The solo in "Heartbreaker" has flubbed notes all over; "Fool in the Rain" sounds like someone noodling with an octave pedal in Guitar Center.

Most of his solos are well written and well played, but he's got a few stinkers in there. Another lesson you get from Jimmy Page: the value of practicing stuff before you take it in the studio! I'd say he probably pissed of his producer laying down crappy takes, were he himself not the producer.