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#1
Hi, it's Ronald Poe again. As you guys might know, I love playing my bass (it makes me feel on top of the world). I was wondering how I could take my bass playing to the next level. What kind of techniques would an Extreme Metal bassist need and how would I make my basslines sound great and work (not just roots)?

I can play a few songs on bass and can play up to 16th notes cleanly with my index finger alone (I use it to strum in the place of a pick). One of my favorite songs to play on it is "It Will All be Mine" from Pokemon Live. I'm also quite good at Rocksmith bass (it's a good way to practice but I know elitists will complain) and I practice regularly. I also know quite a bit of theory.

"It will All Be Mine" (Pokemon Live). Yes Giovanni is played by the American/4 Kids voice-actor who voiced Pegasus (Yugioh).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mocsc_BsAdI

I'm also currently experimenting with DnB (Drum and Bass) and trying to write a Liquid DnB piece. Tips for that would also be appreciated.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#3
The Pokemon song was just for fun. I'd like some actual tips.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#4
Quote by RonaldPoe
Hi, it's Ronald Poe again. As you guys might know, I love playing my bass (it makes me feel on top of the world). I was wondering how I could take my bass playing to the next level. What kind of techniques would an Extreme Metal bassist need and how would I make my basslines sound great and work (not just roots)?


Technique wise, learning to use all of your fingers (on both hands) would be beyond useful. A lot of modern extreme metal utilizes slapping and similar techniques to create crushing tones (that's your thumb), and they can also play practically as fast as a guitarist can play with a pick (that's the rest of your fingers). Using a pick is fine and all, but it's not as kvlt. And seriously, it's just not as versatile.

And bass is all about establishing harmony. Understanding intervals is really useful here (as always), if you have a guitar droning an A note for example, you need to understand what different bass notes do for the whole context. A dissonant interval might make it sound disturbing and distressing, or maybe mysterious. A consonant interval would make it sound more stable. Using these relations between tension and resolution will propel the song forward and keep it interesting.

If the guitar is just playing a brutal riff, what can the bass do to stand out? Well, you could look into playing melodies or even arpeggios in the bassline to give the song more than just the low E note and occasional power chord. Instead of playing a chord progression on guitar and the roots on bass, have you experimented with the opposite? Having a standard metal riff with single notes and fifths with bass providing most of the richer tonalities and movement.

These are mostly just random ideas, but maybe you can take something home from it. I'm not sure if I'm even making any sense.

Quote by RonaldPoe

I can play a few songs on bass and can play up to 16th notes cleanly with my index finger alone (I use it to strum in the place of a pick). One of my favorite songs to play on it is "It Will All be Mine" from Pokemon Live. I'm also quite good at Rocksmith bass (it's a good way to practice but I know elitists will complain) and I practice regularly. I also know quite a bit of theory.


Well, being able to play fast with only your index finger is similar to being able to play fast with only downpicks: kind of pointless. I'd exercise finger cooperation more if I were you.

And those "elitists" are probably experienced musicians who understand the shortcomings of rocksmith I haven't tried it so I can't really say anything with certainty. But I wouldn't be impressed by someone who's good at Rocksmith.

Just learn to apply that theory and you'll be good to go.

Quote by RonaldPoe

I'm also currently experimenting with DnB (Drum and Bass) and trying to write a Liquid DnB piece. Tips for that would also be appreciated.


I can't really say a lot about this. Just get an infectious groove going, a catchy rhythm is the heart of a DnB song.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#5
you better learn to use more than one finger, quick. nobody will take you halfway seriously with that approach and you're losing control over your tone by lacking in efficiency.

ideally you're gonna be able to play with all 4 fingers and your thump to slap, thump, double thump, mute, tap, strum, pluck, and finger at variable dynamics between a soft stroke and a punchy, aggressive, throaty sound

then there's the world of amplification, EQ, and recording. Bass tone is far more important than a guitar's as you're obligated to be boomy and cut through simultaneously without having an overly honky or thin tone

once you get all that down, you get rewarded by having 10% of the space of a stage the sound of a broom closet to move around and show off your 4 octave sweep taps while the soundguy cuts your mids and the 4 kids in the crowd ignore you to talk about the sheer amount of things more important than your playing

then you'll go home and cry, and quit your shitty band, give up bass for like a year, get invited to join a cover band and realize you're still just as good as you were a year ago so you're stuck between "was i always equally terrible or is bass really that easy?" and you live happily ever after playing shitty lynyrd skynyrd tracks and coping with your harsh reality by atrophying your senses with ludicrous amounts of alcohol
modes are a social construct
#6
Kevätuhri, thanks for your tips (Got any for Black Metal guitar and bass). I think Rocksmith is a good practice tool because at least it has you playing accurate parts to songs and it tests your accuracy (along with requiring you to be in-tune). It's not as good as ear-training but it makes practice more fun. However I do practice other songs in my room using my own tabs (it's great to tab out songs yourself).

I'm also trying to evoke a mysterious feel to my next piece while keeping a C Major key (just thought I'd mention that).

I love bass and it makes me feel "on top of the world". I'm aware it's not as showy as lead guitar but I'm good at it and enjoy it too.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
Last edited by RonaldPoe at Oct 11, 2015,
#7
A lot of people always say that black metal is just noise and fast notes and bad tone and such, but those people must be listening to the wrong bands. The section about using different intervals than just roots and fifths between the bass and the guitar is what you could look into.

If you play a basic tremolo picked black metal riff on guitar, you could utilize your knowledge in voice leading to come up with a bassline that harmonizes the guitar in a certain way. In black metal, you're usually going for a dark and desolate sound, so using dissonant intervals and resolving them well is a way to approach it.

Another thing you could look into is pedal point. It's one of the most important composition techniques in black metal, and it can be extended to bass.

Black metal is very much about great melodies. You usually have a strong (and often tremolo picked) melody on the guitar, harmonizing it with different intervals could yield great results.

I'm not really a teacher, so I kind of suck at explaining things in depth. Feel free to ask about anything I'm not explaining clearly enough
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#8
the best advice i've read on black metal was in this site's articles somewhere years ago, dude said "you can just play the root and third, sort of like a power chord, but you don't play the major. only minor. major there is hope, but in black metal there is no hope"

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UZlZuYp1fZc
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YgQRRI9goFg

bass is pretty much meaningless in 99% of black metal though, and stuff like immortal and dimmu borgir is far from trve. you need grim frostbittenness, not just make up
modes are a social construct
Last edited by Hail at Oct 11, 2015,
#9
Quote by Hail
the best advice i've read on black metal was in this site's articles somewhere years ago, dude said "you can just play the root and third, sort of like a power chord, but you don't play the major. only minor. major there is hope, but in black metal there is no hope"


I might actually sig that.

Quote by Hail

bass is pretty much meaningless in 99% of black metal though


Sadly, I agree. I still write nice bass track for my black metal songs
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#10
Thanks again, I appreciate the help. I agree that people who call Black Metal (and Extreme Metal in general) "noise", don't get the complexity and artistic values of the style. It takes skill to play and write. I'm still curious if there are any special intervals or techniques used in Black Metal (Especially Norwegian Black Metal and Blackened Death Metal) harmonies, playing, or composition? I'll give some good examples (I think). Warning some of these barely fit but are worth mentioning.

First we start with Norwegian Black Metal legends, Emperor. The above-mentioned "I am the Black Wizards" (great song by the way) is a good start. Similarly there's Immortal. Here's "Sons of Northern Darkness" by Immortal.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BstHbbpq07s

Next is Behemoth (Innovators of Blackened Death Metal). Here's "Thy Winter Kingdom" by Behemoth.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=T3mkPVznv6c

While it may be Melodic Death Metal, some Dethklok (the band from Metaloclaypse) are rather complex and forbidding. I might just be a huge fan of the show and band, but I thought "Starved" by Dethklok might be worth mentioning.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jAkAgESHQhA

Of course, this wouldn't be complete without a mention of "Dunkelheit" by Burzum (influential yet controversial and harsh-sounding legends of Norwegian Black Metal).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Bm-kdLwBVc
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
Last edited by RonaldPoe at Oct 12, 2015,
#11
not very grim and frostbitten
modes are a social construct
#13
You know, I've written some black metal and black metal influenced thingies I'm pretty proud of. Usually I write something, then when I listen to it again tomorrow it sucks. But I have some pretty cool black metal parts down that I like. You know how I came up with those? Pure accident. Just sitting with the guitar, playing something completely random, and stumbling on something cool. My ears usually handle the rest, and I can come up with something pretty nice. I spend absolutely no time thinking about intervals or harmonies or general theory when writing metal music, it comes later when you want to expand on your ideas.

And even when you do think about intervals and harmony, it's not like you need to be a genius to handle black metal. Minor second and the tritone sound very dissonant. Minor third and minor sixth sound more consonant but still create tension. Major third and major sixth do the same but with a different flavor. Perfect fourth and perfect fifth are usually very stable. When you have a melody, you can harmonize it in any way you like: if you want something dissonant, harmonize it with dissonant intervals, seconds, sevenths and tritones etc. It might be a good idea to resolve everything to a stable interval though. Using less dissonant intervals like the aforementioned minor third might give you a tense, dark sound without sounding way harsh like a minor second for example would. This all depends on your skill and your ears though.

If you're looking at melodies, the minor scale, harmonic minor, and diminished scale are great starting points. Chromatics can blend very well with black metal as well. Just messing around with minor thirds and minor seconds usually creates nice black metal melodies.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#14
personally, i think black metal needs to be fairly droning. shred and thrashy "blackened death" kinda stuff really doesn't fly or it toes the line of becoming something else

but that's just my interpretation. i'd rather listen to ulver than immortal. eeriness and lack of movement are important. obviously there's tremolo picking on intense parts, but it's usually very simple movement. guitar solos happen, i guess, but they're hardly a focus or anything

to me, black metal is an excuse for DIY producers to push metal towards a darker or more proggy direction aside from the facepaint. if it doesn't sound like it was recorded in a mental hospital or a basement, and if the musician/group tours, it's hard to pay much attention aside from, like, emperor, cause emperor is ridiculous (and ihsahn's side project as well)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BA3dePWvJNY

here's a black metal album on the more electronic/sample heavy side that was recorded in a mental institution

then on the more conventional side

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQiMT23QqXM

fun fact for those who didn't know, leviathan/wrest is my avatar
modes are a social construct
Last edited by Hail at Oct 13, 2015,
#15
Thanks for more advice. Hail, that Leviathan song was awesome (very dark, haunting, and atmospheric). Any tips for that kinda style. The first song though was just disturbing.

I'm an electronic musician and bassist but also play guitar. I know bass isn't as important as shrieking vocals and guitars in Black Metal but I think it could provide a throaty, beefy edge tot the music. Burzum definitely has that dark, eerie, and lo-fi sound.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#16
Quote by Hail

fun fact for those who didn't know, leviathan/wrest is my avatar


Heh, I've been wondering who that is. Now I know.

Quote by RonaldPoe
Thanks for more advice. Hail, that Leviathan song was awesome (very dark, haunting, and atmospheric). Any tips for that kinda style. The first song though was just disturbing.



Well, listen to the song, learn to play it, see for yourself. You're kind of making the mistake of assuming that metal or black metal has it's own theory, it's own compositional tehniques etc. and while that might be true to an extent, it's still based on traditional music theory and can be explained with the same terms as everything else. For that drawn-out, atmospheric feel you can try messing around with pedal point, tasteful repetition, deliberate lack of dynamics or at least drastic dynamic changes, "stationary" and deliberately non-functional harmony etc. Simple ideas might just work the best.

That Diagnosis track is sweet, while it's not conventional it's pretty impressive from an atmospheric viewpoint. You could definitely take notes from how that song uses immersion.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#17
Some tracks are disturbing in a good way (like the OST of a Silent Hill game) and that Diagnosis track is one of them. How would I get that "Recorded in a mental asylum" atmosphere through effects like reverb and limiter? What do you mean by "immersion"? I know which intervals sound dark, mysterious, and somewhat brutal together (took some trial and error in Musescore though).

I appreciate both your help. Hail, you seem to know what you're talking about (I mean Extreme Metal). Same with Kevätuhri.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#18
I listened to some of those tracks. I liked them, but ultimately got a bit bored with them after a while. It seemed like they take the same idea and play on it for a long time without much change.

I admit, I'm a child of the 60's and 70's. Most in my generation get stuck there and never leave it. A while back I started listening to Korn because I liked a couple of their more commercial stuff they played on the radio. I got a couple of their CD's. At first I thought most of it was just a lot of noise. Ultimately they became one of my favorite all time bands! That got me listening to all kinds of stuff and Pantera, Primus, Coal Chamber, Snot, Sepultura, Soulfully, Slipknot, and a whole bunch of others became regulars on my playlist.

Nowadays, I don't much listen to the Evli, Darker side of music. I'm just not that into being in that mood any more. I kind of swung back around to the opposite spectrum of stuff I didn't used to like. I really got into Johnny Cash. If you really listen in, even though the music is rather simple and sparse, each note is so carefully crafted and presented its quite amazing. Also Bossa Nova does a lot with very little.

Mostly what I play is improvisational because I really like the immediacy of the music just emerging on the spot. That's why I think the Jazz players are doing the most complex stuff. Most of that is out of my reach in playing well improvisationally because it requires too much thinking. LOL.

I read once that once you get into your 20's, your musical tastes become fixed and most people never venture out any further. I'd encourage everyone to keep listening to new stuff all the time. You really can learn to like a lots of different things even if at first you really start out hating it. Except for a couple tracks, Opera is one thing I never liked very much, but maybe someday ...
#19
Quote by RonaldPoe
"immersion"? .


Musics ability to suck you in and make you forget the world around you.

Quote by edg
I listened to some of those tracks. I liked them, but ultimately got a bit bored with them after a while. It seemed like they take the same idea and play on it for a long time without much change.


Maybe black metal isn't your thing then, those were hardly the most drawn out and repetitive tracks out there. To me, 95% of classic rock and hard rock becomes tedious after a minute, but I could listen to some guy creating feedback for hours To each their own.

Quote by edg
I admit, I'm a child of the 60's and 70's. Most in my generation get stuck there and never leave it. A while back I started listening to Korn because I liked a couple of their more commercial stuff they played on the radio. I got a couple of their CD's. At first I thought most of it was just a lot of noise. Ultimately they became one of my favorite all time bands! That got me listening to all kinds of stuff and Pantera, Primus, Coal Chamber, Snot, Sepultura, Soulfully, Slipknot, and a whole bunch of others became regulars on my playlist.


Heh, you just listed my personal "most boring bands in history" -list (with the exception of primus which is kind of cool I guess), which only shows how taste in music may vary greatly from individual to individual. That's the beauty of it.

Quote by edg
Mostly what I play is improvisational because I really like the immediacy of the music just emerging on the spot. That's why I think the Jazz players are doing the most complex stuff. Most of that is out of my reach in playing well improvisationally because it requires too much thinking. LOL.


Fun fact: I love jazz and improvisation makes up a huge part of my personal style as a musician. Another fun fact: much great music has spawned from fusing jazz with black and death metal It's actually one of my favourite "niche genres".
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#20
This reminds me of when I get "song addiction" (basically, I hear a good song and listen to it continuously). It usually happens due to a mixture of good melody (often catchy) and interesting lyrics with some sweet bass. Often I learn to associate the song with a character (a lot of the times a Creepypasta character).

I've been particularly addicted to "Just Gold" (a Five Nights At Freddy's fan song by Mandopony). It's just well written in everything from arrangement and melody to lyrics and vocals. This one's stuck for at least a month.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bhJGXzOE5fQ

Another FNAF song I've been listening to a lot is "Salvaged" by NateWantsToBattle. It's a really interesting and catchy song.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NaqmqordZs4

I agree that one should listen to all kinds of music and expand their tastes. Sorry for somewhat derailing this thread. I just wanted to add some immersive yet different songs. I really need to learn how to make my own music immersive (ironically I immerse myself in different songs/music before writing my melodies).
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
Last edited by RonaldPoe at Oct 14, 2015,
#21
Oh god, it's FNAF. Not cool, Ronald, not cool.

And derail it all you want, it's your thread. The mods probably don't mind, if everything stays civil.

And it's better to take a simple approach to repetition. It's common sense that if you loop your amazing 8 finger tapping mathrock/grindcore lick 100 times it gets booooring very fast. But simple ideas are often more atmospheric, and immerse the listener more. A more conventional track that uses repetition well is "The Grave" by Ihsahn. Think of him what you will, that track is pretty amazing, and uses repetition of simple ideas very well.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#22
I only posted those two FNAF songs because I thought they were immersive. I'm not a fan of said games (hell I haven't even played one of them) but it's like the MLP fandom (or at least it's darker side), it can produce great music. I'm neutral about both (not a fan but the works themselves aren't something I hate either). I'd suggest listening to both tracks with an open mind. I myself am more of a Gravity Falls and Kingdom Hearts (KH is one of my biggest musical influences).

How does one use repetition and simplicity without boring the audience?
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#23
Quote by RonaldPoe
I only posted those two FNAF songs because I thought they were immersive. I'm not a fan of said games (hell I haven't even played one of them) but it's like the MLP fandom (or at least it's darker side), it can produce great music. I'm neutral about both (not a fan but the works themselves aren't something I hate either). I'd suggest listening to both tracks with an open mind. I myself am more of a Gravity Falls and Kingdom Hearts (KH is one of my biggest musical influences).

How does one use repetition and simplicity without boring the audience?


Sure, I'm just joking around FNAF is terrible, but can still produce nice music of course.

Define audience? As I said, I can pretty much listen to static for hours straight. Some people lose interest during a 4 minute pop song.

You also need to understand that black metal, noise, drone, dark ambient etc. are pretty underground genres nowadays. You kind of don't have an audience to market towards. I'd just write songs that please myself, what kind of music do you enjoy? Pick a song you like, analyze it, dissect it, learn from it. Experiment. People are individuals and like different things, there's no way to make a track that'll please everyone, so making a track that you like is pretty much the best way to go.

I feel like I'm saying the same thing over and over again, maybe it's the only advice I can give. I hope you get some new ideas from my ranting.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#24
Quote by Kevätuhri

Maybe black metal isn't your thing then, those were hardly the most drawn out and repetitive tracks out there. To me, 95% of classic rock and hard rock becomes tedious after a minute, but I could listen to some guy creating feedback for hours To each their own..


No, I actually do like it. But its just not something I want in my vibrational field right now, so to speak...
#25
I understand what you guys are saying. I mostly write electronic music and mostly for my own joy and satisfaction (I write what I want to write). I'm trying to write melodies that sound better, catchier, and more atmospheric. I also desire to write better basslines. I'm trying to write either Black Metal or Doom Metal. I also wish to write DnB (or maybe a percussion ensemble for fun) but that's another story. Most of the time, I experiment with melodies and anticipate the results (which sometimes sound good).
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#26
Quote by edg
It seemed like they take the same idea and play on it for a long time without much change.


yeah that's basically all of black metal. at least atmospheric black metal, which i prefer a lot more than the dimmu borgir kinda "well we'll take heavy metal and make it goth" approach

for me, black metal is the gritty equivalent of what alan parsons was for classic rock

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KLfVAsNHZP4

i think alan parsons is the perfect example of immersion. that specific album is over the life and stories of edgar allan poe. just like black metal, for me, it's not active listening music. you put your record on and just sit back on the bed and reflect for an hour or two and enjoy the atmosphere

p.s. usually when i bring up examples of stuff i listened to in high school (like black metal and alan parsons) i don't actually sit and listen to it cause i can't stand it, but holy shit alan parsons is so good
modes are a social construct
Last edited by Hail at Oct 15, 2015,
#27
Hail, that's a very interesting and good album. "The Raven" is one of my favorites off that album but it's main riff (for the first half) resembles a verse riff from "Band On The Run" (Paul McCartney). Currently I'm trying to write good melodies that are both hard-hitting/heavy and memorable.

Wasn't Alan Parsons Project a prog-rock band??
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
Last edited by RonaldPoe at Oct 15, 2015,
#28
it's hard for me to classify alan parsons. i guess they were prog rock, but it's bordering on being soundtrack music. they use guitars just enough to remind you "oh wait, this is rock music" but the production is ridiculous for its time

its kinda like watching 2001: a space odyssey, timelessly great
modes are a social construct
#29
Kevätuhri, got any tips for dark ambient while you're at it? I'm mostly writing music for myself but may join a band with my bass-playing.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#30
Quote by RonaldPoe
Kevätuhri, got any tips for dark ambient while you're at it? I'm mostly writing music for myself but may join a band with my bass-playing.


I think we've already talked about a lot of things that can be applied to dark ambient as well. Musical ideas that create a certain atmosphere rather than move the song forward are again pretty important. Slow tempo is also very common, and tone is important: echo is of course the staple effect here, and good sustain is important for that dragging feeling. However, I rarely hear dark ambient that's actually played with band instruments. It's often more about synths and orchestral instruments.

One thing I have noticed is the usage of samples. I recall this one song that had samples of a woman screaming in the background, and it was pretty creepy. Some other songs might use the sounds of machinery for example, or maybe just stuff like howling wind and splashing water. You like game music right? Here's a cool track that might not be the exact genre you're looking for, but I think it has cool ideas.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=praLLgVrYFE

Hear the water splashing on the background constantly, and how well it fits the atmosphere? Also, since you're into this whole bass thing, at about 1:50 there starts a pretty sweet bass part.

I don't really pretend to know anything deeper about ambient music. This is all about my own personal observations.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#31
Nice example, I especially like how said water splashing is mixed with the drums to create a sweet beat. The wailing noises also help fit the atmosphere.

I found this helpful and detailed guide to ambient music by Kyoga (yes he's a brony but he definitely knows what he's talking about).
http://mylittleremix.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=4157
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#32
Quote by RonaldPoe
Nice example, I especially like how said water splashing is mixed with the drums to create a sweet beat. The wailing noises also help fit the atmosphere.

I found this helpful and detailed guide to ambient music by Kyoga (yes he's a brony but he definitely knows what he's talking about).
http://mylittleremix.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=4157


That soundtrack is pure genius. I recommend you to check it out, especially songs like Ventricide, Fallen Angel, Diptera Sonata, Chorus Mortus and Cerebrum Dispersio. Great stuff. I'm seriously surprised if you don't enjoy them, at least as game music

I tried to listen to those MLP tracks, and they did sound pretty cool. Not worth pausing the rebirth soundtrack though I know that by today's standards I probably sound like a complete racist if I say I dislike stuff like MLP, but I still do. I just get annoyed a lot more easily than I get impressed. Maybe I'm just a horrible person
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#33
I just listened to the tracks you mentioned along with three more and Rebirth's soundtrack is truly great. I'd describe it as "Silent Hill meets Kingdom Hearts with hints of Metal Gear Solid thrown in". In other words, it's a dark and dramatic work of genius.

You forgot to mention my favorite so far, "Infanticide" (Isaac fight).
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fr2BzEgwBwM

I agree to an extent about MLP. I typically avoid the lighter fan-songs and think 2/3 of the fan-songs in general aren't that good. The show's probably too saccharine for my taste as well (that's why I don't watch the show and haven't seen an episode) but at least it can inspire some good music.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#35
Hail, Majora's Mask is considered a classic these days and some even say it was a worthy successor to Ocarina of Time. It's an amazing game and has a great soundtrack. I think the reason for the remake was because of its large fan-base. As a Creepypasta fan, what's your opinion on the "Song Of Unhealing" ("Song of Healing" reversed) ...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Qr2T1az1Ck

I'm currently writing a cross between a repetitive drum solo and dark ambient. The former is to provide structure and more to latch on to.
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#36
Quote by RonaldPoe
Creepypasta


I, on the other hand, hate creepypasta. Maybe I should hate less things?

Quote by RonaldPoe
Infanticide


Yeah, that track is sweet. It just took a while for it to grow on me. You see, Rebirth is a remake of an older game called simply "the binding of isaac", and has a new soundtrack. The track Infanticide replaced is this monster:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0RMnjL6X2gg

Considered by many to be the final boss music. But I like infanticide and ascension, the tracks that replaced this one in the remake, at least as much as this nowadays.

It's actually one of the more interesting musical comparisons you can make: comparing the original soundtrack to the remade one. Seeing how different composers approached different situations etc. is pretty fascinating. If you want to draw more parallels, here are some tracks from both games that you can compare if you care: Sacrificial-Diptera Sonata (first level), Be Done-Ventricide (an important boss battle), Repentant-Sodden Hollow (second level), the Enmity of the Dark Lord-Hericide (another important boss battle) etc etc. A lot of people say they hate Rebirths soundtrack and that the original is so much better, but I honestly think that Rebirth wipes the floor with the original in every aspect, including the music. I still love the original soundtrack, both games rank among my favourite soundtracks ever.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
Last edited by Kevätuhri at Oct 21, 2015,
#37
Kevätuhri, I was on my 3DS and found "Binding of Issac: Rebirth" for $14.99 on the store. I was wondering if the game itself is worth getting.

Also still working on my music and practicing my bass ...
"I don't know what you're trying to suggest. There's no shame in taking what you need to hold your position!"

Super Buu (DBZ) on assimilation (it could also apply to blues guitar and guitar soloing in general).
#38
Quote by RonaldPoe
Kevätuhri, I was on my 3DS and found "Binding of Issac: Rebirth" for $14.99 on the store. I was wondering if the game itself is worth getting.

Also still working on my music and practicing my bass ...



Depends on what you're looking for I guess, but it does have 96% positive ratings on steam... alongside being one of the absolute greatest games of all time and probably among my top 3 favorite games. Read some reviews and watch videos and see if it looks like your cup of tea.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#40
Quote by RonaldPoe
Hail, Majora's Mask is considered a classic these days and some even say it was a worthy successor to Ocarina of Time.

majora's mask is much better.
BEN DROWNED

yeah i remember when this creepypasta came out in like 2010 when i was a regular on /x/. it's cute. nowhere near as horrifying as the actual game though. that shit gave me nightmares when i was like 6


as for why they remade it: yeah, of course it's cause everybody wanted to see it again. i was super hype when i heard it was getting ported...but i wanted it like OoT's remake, not like Link Between Worlds. they completely ruined the mood of the game and it really bums me out

i remember some kid talking about the ending on my fb page like "this game taught me all about friendship!!!" and showed a screencap of a happy sappy ending

and like, no. the game is sad and nothing good happens. everything you did doesn't matter. just like real life
modes are a social construct
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