#1
Hey guys, I'm looking at getting a new guitar, and want to get an electric one this time. One of the ones that really caught my attention was the Godin xtSA. Not only does it have a look that I like, but it also has the ability to sound like an acoustic guitar. It's a hair more expensive than I was originally looking at, but everything that I had read about it is that it's a pretty good guitar unless you are just being super picky. I wanted to know though if there were any other guitars that had a set up like this, without having to go through a pedal. Looking to stay under $1,000. Thanks guys!
#2
If you have a drill press you should be able to install a piezo pickup system on almost any electric and get an acoustic sound out of it.
#3
If you want something that's a hair weirder and marginally more like a Vespa scooter than anyone else can really pull off, take a look at the Italia Mondial. Can't vouch for quality, since I haven't tried one, but I've always thought they looked neat, and it's got piezo saddles. Don't know about US prices but I think it should be comfortable inside of your budget.
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#4


Buy a bloody Variax, for cryin' out loud.

Not only does it have piezos built in, but it also has guitar *modeling* built in, and can reproduce specific acoustic guitars, with models based on a 1959 Martin D-28, a 67 Martin 0-18, a 1966 Guild F212 (a jumbo-bodied Guild 12-string with mahogany back and rims), a 1995 Gibson J-200, and even a 1928 National Tricone Resonater guitar. All this in addition to the LPs, teles, strats and other guitars modeled on these guitars.

http://line6.com/variax-modeling-guitars/sound/ will give you just a few of the available sounds on this guitar.
#5
Quote by jpnyc
If you have a drill press you should be able to install a piezo pickup system on almost any electric and get an acoustic sound out of it.


Almost any guitar will allow you to install piezos (see http://www.graphtech.com/products/brands/ghost ). A rudimentary preamp (the one installed in the Godin, for example) will give you a *sort of* acoustic sound, and you can usually combine that with whatever magnetic pickups you have on board (depending on the installation), but it is a "sort of" acoustic sound.

This is their claim:

#6
^^^^ I've tried That set up, using Baggs piezo saddles and a fairly good preamp/mixer, and didn't like it. The attack and sustain were all wrong, and it was too harsh and bright. Maybe preamps and EQing have improved since then, but I've never been inclined to try it again.

If I were tempted in that piezo direction again, it would likely be one of the Godin semi-hollows or a Gibson Chet Atkins. While I've suggested the Variax in other fora, based on your comments, it doesn't appeal to me personally.

OTOH, I like piezo-magnetic blends in acoustic guitars to get a smoother, less jangly sound.
#7
Quote by Tony Done
^^^^ I've tried That set up, using Baggs piezo saddles and a fairly good preamp/mixer, and didn't like it. The attack and sustain were all wrong, and it was too harsh and bright. Maybe preamps and EQing have improved since then, but I've never been inclined to try it again.

If I were tempted in that piezo direction again, it would likely be one of the Godin semi-hollows or a Gibson Chet Atkins. While I've suggested the Variax in other fora, based on your comments, it doesn't appeal to me personally.

OTOH, I like piezo-magnetic blends in acoustic guitars to get a smoother, less jangly sound.


I have a Taylor T5 that I think successfully blends a very good acoustic sound with a pair of humbuckers (albeit unusual humbuckers). but at prices north of $2200, it's not going to fit the OP's budget.

I agree that the traditional business of simply adding piezo saddles and a preamp doesn't really duplicate an acoustic very well.

I'm not trying to convert everyone to Variaxes (that's Line 6's job and they don't pay me a commission), but they do what they do pretty well, and they're really the ONLY sane solution for some issues.
#8
I really love the Chet Atkins gibson model. I work on one quite often at my church. That godin is looking pretty cool, but I haven't tried one.
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#9
Thanks guys for the input. I looked at the veriaxs and they seem to be a little better on the skin deep level. Any input on how they hold up. I've read some mixed reviews and it looks like the old ones had given people some problems with the electronics. I didn't really see any recent bad reviews. Did they fix the problems they had?
#10
Variax the way to go my friend. Awesome. And you can get groovy banjo and sitar on there too. lol.
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#11
Quote by thatdude38
Thanks guys for the input. I looked at the veriaxs and they seem to be a little better on the skin deep level. Any input on how they hold up. I've read some mixed reviews and it looks like the old ones had given people some problems with the electronics. I didn't really see any recent bad reviews. Did they fix the problems they had?



I'm not sure.

I have two old ones (a 500 Electric and a 700 Acoustic) and they've been perfect for a long time. But I'm mostly playing two of the new JTV89F's. In short, I have no idea how they hold up until one of them breaks.
#12
The new Variax Standard has the same electronics as the James Tyler guitars, just in a bit cheaper guitar body (Yamaha Pacifica more or less). I got one of those recently, works great for a pretty decent acoustic sound (good enough for the bars in other words). And only costs about $800 (US) new.

Had no issues so far, other than the cap on a selector knob came off, but a bit of superglue fixed that.

I think it's not a replacement for a true acoustic if you are doing an all-acoustic concert, but it's close enough if you have songs that you need to switch between acoustic and electric sounds quickly.
#13
Well I ended up finding a jtv-59 on Craigslist and ended up getting it. It is almost brand new because the guy had one that had some faulty electronics that he sent back and they warrantied to out and sent him a brand new one. It basically sat around in its case because he had too many guitars and I bought it for $550. It still has all the plastic cling wrap on it. I'm pretty excited. It sounds even better in person than I thought it would!!
#14
I was going to suggest you need something like a Fishman Aura DI that takes the hardness off the piezo. At the other end Behringer do one that costs a fraction of the price and is OK. I am disappointed you found a solution in the Variax JTV-59. After curing myself of guitar buying syndrome I really think I need one of these!!
#15
Quote by thatdude38
Well I ended up finding a jtv-59 on Craigslist and ended up getting it. It is almost brand new because the guy had one that had some faulty electronics that he sent back and they warrantied to out and sent him a brand new one. It basically sat around in its case because he had too many guitars and I bought it for $550. It still has all the plastic cling wrap on it. I'm pretty excited. It sounds even better in person than I thought it would!!


Outstanding.
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One caution. The acoustic models are designed to sound like a miked acoustic, and the tone knob models the placement of the microphone (closer/farther away). That's not the caution. Like most miked acoustic guitars, it's not designed to be run through a standard guitar amp. That will give you a sort of muted guitar (guitar amps don't have the same frequency response as a PA). If you treat the output of the Variax' acoustic models exactly as you would a miked acoustic, they'll sound very good indeed.
#16
Just to muddy the waters up a bit. If you have a strat type guitar with 3 single coil pickups you can try the out of phase sounds into a very dry clean amp. It gets closer than you would imagine. If you have the option to have all 3 pickups on at once it will get even closer. Also some acoustic simulators do a decent job too. I am not a fan of peizo pickups they really don't nail the acoustic tone to me. I feel a three single coil pickup guitar with the right amp and EQ will get you closer.
#17
Piezo in electrics sound pretty damn terrible unless your running a hybrid rig and are using a PA or separate amp for the acoustic tones. I had a Godin Montreal - which was a $2000 guitar and the acoustic sounds were so bad that I sold it. It's like piercing tin. Don't expect an electric to sound like an acoustic without an enormous hassle, and even then it will sound pretty bad.

The Variax clips are good, but I would have to hear them in a jamming context at loud volumes to be sold, because that's were all the modelers fall apart. The price is decent though and based on the clips they sound better than the piezo's in typical electrics.
#18
Quote by reverb66


The Variax clips are good, but I would have to hear them in a jamming context at loud volumes to be sold, because that's were all the modelers fall apart. The price is decent though and based on the clips they sound better than the piezo's in typical electrics.


Easy enough -- pull up a U2 album or concert. Edge has two Variax Acoustic 700's that he regularly uses. The Acoustic 700 looks like a thinline acoustic, but is actually a solid mahogany-bodied guitar at heart, with a wide variety of acoustic models including a nylon string not duplicated by the other Variax guitars.

His'n:



controls:



The three sliders allow, variously, the selection of the individual models within the group selected by the rotating knob, the "distance of the mike" from the modeled guitar, the volume and the setting of the alternate tunings available.

One main benefit of using one of these (or the models built into the other Variax guitars) on stage is the almost complete lack of feedback ("in a jamming context at loud volumes").

I don't think there are a lot of complaints about these models falling apart at volume; they're currently being used by everyone from metal to country players onstage and have been for some years. Mutt Lange famously selected the tele model built into the Variax over real teles for Shania Twain's first tour. In addition, the single coil (strat, P90, etc.) models can be used without fear of the RF noise from neon signs, ice machines on the same circuit in bars, etc.

These may be the most stage and recording-studio friendly guitars in the business.
#19
For years, the only real option to give your electric guitar acoustic capability was to install piezo-embedded saddles and route a preamp cavity into your guitar. Virtually destroying the value of the instrument and making it pointless to ever uninstall the system.

We have just developed a Hi-fidelity piezo saddle pickup that's incredibly simple to install, reversible, and non-destructive to the instrument. No routing, No drilling, No on-board preamp. It's a radically different approach to the piezo embedded saddles on the market. Virtually any guitar, even priceless vintage instruments can be converted to piezo-acoustic.

(removed)
Last edited by BrennerUSA at Oct 14, 2015,
#20
Quote by BrennerUSA
For years, the only real option to give your electric guitar acoustic capability was to install piezo-embedded saddles and route a preamp cavity into your guitar. Virtually destroying the value of the instrument and making it pointless to ever uninstall the system.


Aside from moving the preamp outside the guitar, I'm not sure that I see the benefit.
Further, I'm not sure that manufacturers are allowed to spam the forums.

If you're going to be at NAMM in January, I'll look you up.
#21
Quote by dspellman
Aside from moving the preamp outside the guitar, I'm not sure that I see the benefit.
Further, I'm not sure that manufacturers are allowed to spam the forums.

If you're going to be at NAMM in January, I'll look you up.


We are brand new, so I'm not sure if we will be able to make it to NAMM.

No intentions to "spam", just responding to the thread with a piezo option that is widely unknown the the guitar community.

The benefits of the system are 1) there is no routing or major alterations done to the guitar 2) the elements are not embedded into the saddle, rather, the string supports rest on and direct energy onto the piezo.
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Last edited by BrennerUSA at Oct 14, 2015,