#1
Hey guys, I was hoping that some one could give me some good use to this chord. I understand how it's built and that it's also the 1st degree of Harmonic Minor, besides that I don't understand how to apply it to progressions :/
#3
The last chord of James Bond theme. Well, it's actually a mmaj9.

Where a mmaj7 chord may be used is in a major key progression that contains a minor iv chord. If over that chord you use the major third of the key scale, you are treating the chord as a mmaj7. Though it's not rare that the iv minor chord is a m7.

Oh, mmaj7 chord is pretty common in songs that have a chromatically descending bassline - well it doesn't need to be in the bassline. For example Am-Ammaj7-Am7-Am6. That's the generic Latin piano riff.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BOz3p6k5O2g
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

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Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Oct 11, 2015,
#4
It's not really a functional chord quality, so it doesn't come with a place where you're "supposed" to use it. Like MaggaraMarine said, most of the time you see it it's incidental to a melodic line, and not really a harmony unto itself.

It's a chord that you have to voice lead your way in and out of. There's really no jumping to a mM7 unless you have a very good reason for it.
#6
I would encourage you to not try to think your way through the question of how to use this chord. There isn't a set of easily-applicable rules that will give you anything but very cliched-sounding progressions.

Instead, listen your way through it.

Develop your ear until you can recognize how this chord sounds when you hear it in practice.

At that point, you'll likely find that it shows up naturally in your songwriting.
#7
Good stuff here. You can usually slap it onto any stable minor chord, e.g., one that isn't part of a II-V.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#8
it is also the first chord in the melodic minor scale..as jet pointed out you can use it in place of a minor chord that is not part of a cadence ii7 V7..type feel..

its a great chord to use in a "fusion" style progression as it has that "airy" ambiguous quality and you have a very wide choice of scales you can play on top of it
play well

wolf
#9
Wait wait wait, not in ii-V-I?

https://youtu.be/VecunpIqlg0

Again, common practice, not rule.
Glad to cross paths with you on this adventure called life
Quote by Jet Penguin
lots of flirting with the other key without confirming. JUST LIKE THEIR LOVE IN THE MOVIE OH DAMN.
Quote by Hail
you're acting like you have perfect pitch or something
#10
Not meaning "not usually". Gimme a little damn credit Neo.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#11
I'll just be the reigning pedant ^^;

Jet.credit += 0.5!
Glad to cross paths with you on this adventure called life
Quote by Jet Penguin
lots of flirting with the other key without confirming. JUST LIKE THEIR LOVE IN THE MOVIE OH DAMN.
Quote by Hail
you're acting like you have perfect pitch or something
#12
I understood that Jet was talking about the i chord not being a mmaj7 in a ii-V-i progression in a minor key.

So really, that example was not an example of what Jet was talking about (if I understood correctly). I hear the mmaj7 in that song more as a tonicization for the ii chord. It's almost like a secondary dominant.

And again, it's used in a descending chromatic line. That must be the most common way of using a mmaj7. I don't hear it as a separate chord, it's more of a melodic thing.

The IImmaj7 is also used in Happy Xmas by John Lennon in a similar way as in the song Neo posted (in the "war is over" part). In that case it's not a descending chromatic line, though.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#13
Quote by MaggaraMarine
I understood that Jet was talking about the i chord not being a mmaj7 in a ii-V-i progression in a minor key.


No, he said the opposite.

e.g., [a chord] that isn't part of a II-V.

==> Not ii
==> Not V

You can usually slap it onto any stable minor chord

==> usually i
#14
Yeah, I was referring to standalone min/maj7 chords, not ones that are part of a line cliche.

Usually we don't see that extension on related II's, as the use of the colors from Melodic Minor imply some sort of stability.

One thing you could see is something like this:

F#m7b5 - B7b9 - Em/maj7 - A7 - Dmaj7

That isn't totally out of left field because we've tonicized the Em, and it totally sounds like I when it first appears, before the following chord causes us to re-evaluate it's other function (IIm7 in D major)

But something like this:

C - Am7 - Dm/maj7 - G7 -Cmaj7

Is a little more odd, as the implications don't match up with the harmonic movement, if that makes sense.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#15
Note the voice leading from the E in the F#m7b5 in that example, and it's why the progression works.

It's hard to throw a goofy harmony like mM7 into the middle of a progression unless you can make some melodic sense of the "out" tone.