#1
Had a post prior thinking my issue was a knowledge of chords and come to find out, it may be more my knowledge of instantly knowing what note I am playing on the fretboard at all times. I can easily figure it out by counting up notes by half step to find out which note I am playing, but I tend to have a problem knowing exactly where I am at at any given time without doing this. This tends to slow me down as the rest of my knowledge surpasses this basic little area I neglected for so many years. I did some searches on here and didn't find anything. I was wondering if anyone could point me in the direction of exercises or tips and techniques of learning the fretboard like the back of your hand.
#2
learn your intervals

if you know where your 3rds, 5th, 7ths and octaves are at all times you can find any note from adjusting that
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#3
Cool appreciate that. Will use that trick. I do octaves just fine. The other 2 I know where they are at but don't really use them as such.
#4
your ability to come up with chord and arpeggio voicings will get pretty ridiculous if you extrapolated it to cover an entire 5-fret position
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#5
It takes time to learn them, but I've seen this tape you stick on the back of your neck that shows positions and stuff. Could try that for a bit.
#6
Quote by SpykSaturn
Cool appreciate that. Will use that trick. I do octaves just fine. The other 2 I know where they are at but don't really use them as such.
The CAGED system might help you: 5 shapes for every major chord that overlap all the way up the neck (and repeats after 12 frets).
So if you know (eg) that a C chord has the notes C-E-G (and which is which), then you know that all five shapes for a C chord also have the same 3 notes. Follow the shapes up the neck, and you have 3 notes plotted right away, in all their positions. You only need 4 more (sharps and flats take care of themselves).
#7
I'll post the same thing here:

You just need to play more music. Knowing all the theory in the world doesn't help if you don't know how it works in practice.

Learn to play songs. Learn to play them by ear. I think ear training is very important.

But yeah, if you want to learn how to use chords, you need to use them.

To me it sounds like you haven't played a lot. You know a lot of explanations, but you don't really know the practice. So start using your ears and start playing music.

I'm not a great guitarist but if somebody told me to play an Amaj7 chord, I could instantly play it (and multiple voicings of it). And I have never really practiced playing chords per se. I have just played songs and learned how to play an Amaj7 (or whatever) chord that way. It's in my muscle memory. Some chords that I haven't used a lot are not in my muscle memory, so I can't play them instantly, even if I knew exactly what frets I need to play. I just haven't used the chord in practice so I can't change to it fluently.

So you just need to play a lot of chords. That's how you learn to play them. Learn to play songs. Theory without learning actual music is useless.


Also, follow the advice the other guys gave you in the other thread. Read their posts carefully. They are not telling you to learn what you already know, they are telling you to apply it to the fretboard.

What may also help with instantly knowing what notes you are playing is learning to read sheet music.
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#8
First, you might want to get an intro to music theory book (or find a web site) that will give you some background independent of the guitar. You really don't need a whole lot of theory for most practical purposes. Just get through scales and chord formation.

Second, you don't really need to memorize the whole fretboard note names. Start with just the low E string (which also gives you the high E string) and then the A string. It's generally a lot more important to how a note relates to the current chord/key. I.e if the note is root, 3 or 5 of the current chord.

Third, learn to arpeggiate the major chord and then the minor chord up & down the neck. It's actually pretty easy. I've posted a lot about this before. I also have a very good practice routine that really helps cement this in your head. If you do no other practice, do this one. I have a vid on this if you follow the link to my profile in my sig.

I'd also agree that the CAGED system is a very useful concept to know with respect to how the basic chords are formed up & down the neck.
#9
Ok so I found a book with an easy technique. Learn just the notes of the first two strings for the octaves and then learn this bar chord shape and apply it to find out where your at at all times. Pretty interesting and did the trick just from a read. So basically it told you know your octaves (aka power chord spacing minus the middle note which I already knew) and then for finding out the 5th and 6th strings just go back a fret (say from what note your on on the first string) and apply that to the corresponding string (in this case the 5th) and you have your octave. So if you know the first two strings you pretty much can find anywhere instantly after a little practice.

This was exactly what I was looking for. Now if I want to make an A chord, I already know the shapes but I can easily go here here here or here. Very excited!
#10
Quote by SpykSaturn
Had a post prior thinking my issue was a knowledge of chords and come to find out, it may be more my knowledge of instantly knowing what note I am playing on the fretboard at all times. I can easily figure it out by counting up notes by half step to find out which note I am playing, but I tend to have a problem knowing exactly where I am at at any given time without doing this. This tends to slow me down as the rest of my knowledge surpasses this basic little area I neglected for so many years. I did some searches on here and didn't find anything. I was wondering if anyone could point me in the direction of exercises or tips and techniques of learning the fretboard like the back of your hand.


This may help you.

http://www.ultimate-guitar.com/lessons/the_basics/drastically_reduce_learning_time_with_intervals_part_2.html
#12
Quote by SpykSaturn
Yep thats pretty much what was in the book. Book still has more to it. Been really digging into it. Helping out much!


Cool. Stick at it ... I used to do short exercises, like playing through all the octaves from some start pitch, in time to a metronome (adds a bit of mental pressure). And the interval of 11 semitones (aka maj 7th) is one fret behind the upper pitch in any octave shape, while the interval of 10 semitones (aka min 7th) is 2 frets behind the upper pitch of the octave shape ... so you know one of the shapes that must be present in any form of major 7th or minor 7th chord.

If you learn the shapes for 3 and 4 semitones (aka min 3rd and maj 3rd), just challenge yourself ... choose random string and fret for the lower pitch, and play the shape. Just watch out for the way it changes on the G and B strings.

I used to do stuff like "play 3rd starting on 6th string. then use top note of that (on 5th string) to start another 3rd, and so on, crossing the guitar neck." That was good for driving home the difference that occurs on the G and B strings. I'd do this with all maj 3rds, or all min 3rds, or alternating from maj 3 to min 3rd, or alternating from min 3rd to maj 3rd. (these latter two create sound beautiful sounds)

If you learn the shape for 7 semitones (aka 5th), either on 2 adjacent strings, or across 3 strings, then you've got all the needed shapes for the basic chords. And then it's trivial to adjust to get b5 or #5 as occur in the more unstable sounding chords.

Good luck.
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Oct 20, 2015,