#1
I was just wondering if it is possible to play a non bass guitar thru a bass amp head.

I see a bass amp head for sale on CL for $100 (USD). I was wondering what problems would I have plugging standard electric guitars into this amp....The head is a Peavey Mark III 300 chs

The guitars are Dean, Ibanez and guitars.

I use a (my sons) muti effects processor to get tones.....so I am thinking all I need is something to amplify that tone (I would ofcourse send the sound to a standard guitar cabinet

I'm not a serious player by any means.....I just mess around with my sons gear. The guitars are his. The floor processor is his. He's also (rececently) got a 1 watt Killer Ant tube amp, a Marshall micro stack, a Crate power Block and a Crate 4x12 cabinet.

Another question: When we try to mic the little tube amp to the Power Block into the 4x12....there is alot of feedback......so what I am also wondering is could this bass amp mic the small tube amp with out it (bass amp) giving feedback?

When I first started buying stuff for my son to play music, I thought it was just a phase he was going thru, but just listening to him progress and listening to his band has inspired me to get some gear of my own so we can do stuff together as father/son....plus it's cool as hell. I bought a mid 80's Jackson Soloist.....it's a project guitar so for now I mess around with my sons guitars and the rest of his gear.
Last edited by tonysilva530 at Oct 11, 2015,
#2
A general rule is, it's OK to play an electric guitar thru a bass amp or bass amp head but it isn't recommended to play bass guitar on an guitar amp. because the guitar amp speaker isn't designed to handle very low frequencies. when playing your electric guitar thru the bass amp, just increase the setting for high and mid while setting bass a little lower. Good luck, check how many ohms the bass amp head is and if its compatible with the speaker cab.
#3
Ok. Thanks for the info.....my sons Marshall cabinets are 8 ohms each
and his Crate 4x12 is switchable 16 or 8

Note: If I buy the bass amp head, I will be playing into standard guitar speakers (not bass speakers).

And is $100 (USD) a fair price to pay for the Peavey Mark III 300chs amp head? I don't want to lowball the seller nor do I want to get ripped off.

Here's the CL add: https://chico.craigslist.org/msg/5164925705.html
Last edited by tonysilva530 at Oct 11, 2015,
#5
Hmmm. If it were me, i'd go with the bass amp head. I was lucky and i scored on a Randall RX120D guitar amp head 120-watts with foot switch, later i got an Acoustic B200H bass amp head 200-watts (i didn't take picture of the bass amp head though). I guess the bass amp head a good deal but if your not in a hurry to buy one, i'm sure you can get something later.
#6
I am actually eyeing this amp on eBay, but since i already own a Peavey Envoy 110 Transtube 40-watts (SS amp which emulate tube amp sound has reverb) Silver Stripe version... very good clean channel (takes pedals very well), good spring reverb and useable drive channel.

The Peavey Envoy 110 Transtube Red Stripe version has very good clean (same as mine) and better overdrive channel. price is fair too for USA made, as long as everything is working. - http://www.ebay.com/itm/141795253305?_trksid=p2060353.m1438.l2649&ssPageName=STRK%3AMEBIDX%3AIT
Last edited by psp742 at Oct 11, 2015,
#7
If the decision is just price driven I would recommend waiting and buying a proper guitar amp.
#8
Quote by mockbel
If the decision is just price driven I would recommend waiting and buying a proper guitar amp.


This.


But more importantly, you NEED to make sure that the cab you will be driving with the bass amp is capable of handling the wattage and the ohms from the head. This has blown speakers written all over it.

Bass amps are often very high watt compared to guitar amps which are usually 100 watts on the upper end of the spectrum, as i understand.


Also, it's not going to sound to great.
#9
Also general rule an amp head having lower ohms can power speaker cab with higher ohm (but will not be 100% maximized) but if the amp head which has higher ohm rating like 8 or 16ohms cannot be used with speaker cab with only 4ohms speaker rating (because speakers were not designed to handle higher ohms and they will be ruined).

The Peavey Envoy 110 transtube red stripe is a combo so you don't need to connect it to a speaker cab, it does have a connection to external so you do get that option.
Last edited by psp742 at Oct 12, 2015,
#10
A little googling and it looks like this is a 150 watt amp at 4 ohms.

It should work as a guitar amp, try to match the speaker impedance if possible. It's a solid state amp and they are less picky about the impedance. You can run it with a 8 ohm cabinet and all it will do is make the amp work a little harder, no damage likely. Running through a 2 ohm cabinet might fry a transformer, but solid state is more forgiving about that than tube amps are. A 4 ohm cabinet would be best. Most are marked on back.

As a bass amp, here's what a few people think about it.

http://www.talkbass.com/threads/peavey-mark-iii-series-300-chs.289925/

As long as you don't max it out, it will not hurt a 100 watt cabinet, and knowing what these babies will do, I don't think you'll be pumping enough volume through it to damage speakers at home...At bedroom volume you're using maybe 5 watts or so...and not many bass players play this amp maxed out. Expect it to get freakin LOUD...keep the volume under about halfway and it shouldn't damage a 100 watt speaker.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
Last edited by Paleo Pete at Oct 12, 2015,
#11
Well, after much research and reading about the Peavey bass amp head priced @ $100, (it is a fair price) butI have decided to pass on it.

However, today I did look at a Peavey monitor amp priced @ $75.....it looks physically similar to the bass amp head, they are both "300 Series" amps (if I am understanding correctly). And for 75 bucks, it is 25 dollars cheaper than the bass amp head. Also if that isn't enough........

.....I also looked at a keyboard amp. It is a Peavey KB-100. That it has a 15 inch speaker and was loud as hell (I tested it with the owners DS-1 pedal and his electric guitar)....it sounded really good. That thing was probably the loudest single speaker amplifier I've ever heard. The owner is moving across the country next weekend and is selling off all the gear he doesn't use.

In regards to the KB-100 amplifier, it's old but the seller only want's $50 for it.....I would have grabbed it right-then-and-there, but I was on my motorcycle. Anyhow, after researching this keyboard amp, I learned that it also can be a microphone amplifier.

So now I have a question:
Would it be possible to microphone a really small amplifier into this keyboard amp? I bought my son a 1 watt amp to practice with in his room.......it's not super loud, but now he likes the tube sound better........he tried to microphone that small amplifier to the bigger one but got the feed back.


Mockbel asked in an earlier post if my choice is "price driven". I think I would say my decision is not necessarily based on the actual cost of an item, I would say I lean more towards the better deal. For example, I would rather pay $200 for something worth $400 rather than pay $200 for something worth $250........I wouldn't mind spending $200, but I'm always looking for the best deal without trying to price negotiate.

*As a side note, as I mentioned earlier, I am not trying to be come a serious musician......just wanna have fun with my son as his skills mature.

From what I've learned (and this may not be totally accurate) is that new music gear on the show room floor has a steep price, but for the most part, when buying used gear on the streets, that used gear price generally stays the same no matter how old the gear gets (as long it isn't abused).
Last edited by tonysilva530 at Oct 13, 2015,
#12
Quote by tonysilva530


.....I also looked at a keyboard amp. It is a Peavey KB-100. That it has a 15 inch speaker and was loud as hell (I tested it with the owners DS-1 pedal and his electric guitar).... Anyhow, after researching this keyboard amp, I learned that it also can be a microphone amplifier.

So now I have a question:
Would it be possible to microphone a really small amplifier into this keyboard amp? I bought my son a 1 watt amp to practice with in his room.......it's not super loud, but now he likes the tube sound better........he tried to microphone that small amplifier to the bigger one but got the feed back.


You can mike the small amp and output the result through the big amp, but you can't have the miked amp close to the big amp. You'll get feedback. This depends on the quality and the KIND of mike you're using, but if you're using the two close together, you'll develop a feedback loop. It might be more useful for him to simply plug into the keyboard amp directly. He's just discovered one of the drawbacks to an all-tube amp.

I think you will find that your KB 100 (buy it) also has a tweeter to handle the highs in addition to the 15" that's working the lows. If I'm not mistaken, there's also an FX loop built into the back of the amp, but it works a bit differently from the usual. Rather than having a separate input and output, it uses a stereo (TRS) cable and jack that you need to split.

Quote by tonysilva530

From what I've learned (and this may not be totally accurate) is that new music gear on the show room floor has a steep price, but for the most part, when buying used gear on the streets, that used gear price generally stays the same no matter how old the gear gets (as long it isn't abused).


That's pretty much on the money. Initial depreciation happens as you walk out the door. After a year or two, most guitars are worth about 50% of their new price (obviously, this varies). As prices of the new guitars go up (or inflation drives them up), you'll often find the used ones appreciating a bit, so that after 10 years or so, they may be worth nearly their original price (but much less than what a current new guitar would be).

One thing that puts a fly in that ointment is "fashion." Current fashion, for example, is a flat black guitar. Those will date themselves when the fashion is over, like Olivia Newton John, headbands and spandex.
#13
Quote by dspellman
That's pretty much on the money. Initial depreciation happens as you walk out the door. After a year or two, most guitars are worth about 50% of their new price (obviously, this varies). As prices of the new guitars go up (or inflation drives them up), you'll often find the used ones appreciating a bit, so that after 10 years or so, they may be worth nearly their original price (but much less than what a current new guitar would be).

+1

100% correct economic rule
#14
Our bass/keyboard player plays through the same KB 100 amp. I've played it onstage years ago when my guitar amp died one night, and used it to run stereo guitar a few times. I'd run my analog delay through the effects loop, one side back into the effects loop on my amp, the other side into the KB amp. Worked perfect.

I think dspellman is right, it should have a tweeter along with the 15", which should be a Black Widow. Yeah it's loud as hell. If you mic the smaller amp into it and keep the smaller amp across the room, it should work fine, and if the smaller amp happens to have a line out that will work too, in the Power Amp In jack on back of the amp. If you mic it, don't point the amp toward the KB amp, keep it off to one side with both facing the same direction.

To minimize feedback, keep the channel volume fairly low and the master volume just to what you need for overall volume level, and keep the smaller amp away from it. You might even be able to put it off to one side just a few feet and get good results.

You can also plug straight into one channel of the keyboard amp, it works fine but won't sound quite as good as a tube amp. Should do a pretty good job though.

That amp is a workhorse, was used by a lot of keyboard players, I've seen bass players use them too. You can get a pretty decent crunchy sound (for a solid state amp) by running the channel volume about 7 and master volume whatever you need for overall volume.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#15
My guitar sounded fucking heavy through my old Fender Rumble with a 15" speaker. All you need is a good distortion pedal and you can get a ball crushing tone. Just don't play bass through a guitar amp!
Baby Joel's rabbit profile picture is kinda cute. #TeamJOEL
#16
Like playing metal on a Les Paul.....it just cant be done.
Bhaok

The following statement is true. The proceeding statement is false.
#18
I've played a guitar through a bass player G&K full stack. The tone was a little dull (because it's designed for lower bass tones) but I was able to really crank it without driving the speakers as hard as a bass would've.

Just never do the opposite (bass in a guitar amp)