#1
So I picked up my first electric guitar a couple weeks ago. Since then I've just been doing exercises to get used to everything. Now I'm slowly learning to play a couple songs. As you know some songs have multiple tabs that are different, and its confusing me cause I don't know which one to pick. Do you all usually just go off ratings?

Not sure if I'll ever youtube "how to play…" confused me even more when I started looking at the actual tabs.
Thanks
#2
It's typically a good starting point to go with whichever is the highest rated tab. Make sure it has a good number of ratings too, though. Like, if I see a tab that has a five star rating off of 10 votes, but there's one with four stars off of 100 votes, I'll check out the four star one first.

But also, start training your ear asap. It shouldn't take too long before you can at least tell when something sounds wrong. That way, you can use tabs as a guide, to figure stuff out faster than you would by sounding it out alone, but you can adjust if the tab doesn't sound 100% accurate.

Also, I've always found videos of other people playing songs to be more helpful than tabs, except for really complex stuff, in which case the tabs really help, but a video does too.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#3
I don't like "how to play" videos either. Impossible to get an overview.

When I choose tabs I choose the one that sounds the most right. Of course, this might be a little difficult in the begining.
Also, please don't trust tabs too much. Sometimes it's like some tabbers couldn't possibly ever have touched a guitar, because the fingerings they write are so rediculously akward.
Also sometimes even the best tab out there is pure shit so you have to try and improve it yourself.
#4
I will read the reviews first if there are any. If someone commented the chord is wrong, the key is wrong whatsoever, I will just skip that. Not so concern about fingerings though.
It is annoying to have so many versions of the tab for the same song.
Amateur guitarist straight from the oven !




#5
Quote by TTime523
So I picked up my first electric guitar a couple weeks ago. Since then I've just been doing exercises to get used to everything. Now I'm slowly learning to play a couple songs. As you know some songs have multiple tabs that are different, and its confusing me cause I don't know which one to pick. Do you all usually just go off ratings?

Not sure if I'll ever youtube "how to play…" confused me even more when I started looking at the actual tabs.
Thanks


1) Always rely on your ears. If it sounds wrong, chances are that it is wrong - find the note that sounds right. Start trying to figure things out by ear - choose simple melodies to start and work your way up.

2) you tube video lessons are pretty decent - use those and check the video of the actual song being played by the artist - between that, the tab and your ears - you should be able to figure out a decent way of playing anything.

3) It's possible, due to the way the guitar works ( i.e. the same notes being found on many strings), to play the same thing in many different places on a guitar - as long as you are playing the right notes, it doesn't make a huge difference whether you are playing it the exact same way as the original. Keep that in mind.

4) choose the one with the best ratings. If you really want something accurate - buy the tab book.
#6
Quote by reverb66

4) choose the one with the best ratings. If you really want something accurate - buy the tab book.


There are numerous examples of tab books being far less accurate than fan made tabs, Mastodon coming to mind first. But I agree that most of the time you can't go wrong with a book.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

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*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#7
I own and have learned from dozens of tab books by Alfred Publishing and Hal Leonard. They are flawless. The transcribers are professionals, who are way better at what they do than anyone publishing tabs on a community site like this. Maybe there are some "official" tab books that have errors. Maybe. I've never seen one. And so far, every example anyone has tried to show me of an official book being wrong, turned out that it was actually right, and that person was just misinterpreting something.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#8
Yeah, I'd agree. Buy some tab books from some pros. They are really very good. Very accurate. Very much notated musically correct with a lot of attention to detail. It's worth the $ and they really aren't very expensive in the big scheme of things. A lot of work goes into those published tabs.

Ultimately, even the best of tabbers are only guessing at the exact figurings and things, but I think some of the pro's get really really close to how something was actually played. I'll bet you they can even write it out way way better than the original guy played it could. Especially when it was improvised.

Some things are near impossible to tab I think. I've been trying for AGEs trying to figure out what Hendrix is doing in the Band of Gypsies version of Machine Gun. I've worked on just the first few measures of the intro in a number of tabs and I just can't seem to get it. I get close, but I'm just missing something there. LOL. It's probably something really simple I'm missing and I've just got some kind of block on it... Perhaps one day. Never give up!
#9
One more thing about tabs:

Personally I've liked using them to figure out what sort of head space the guy playing it was into while they were doing it. Once I get to that point, I don't really care so much about doing it note-for-note and I generally just lose interest in figuring it out to that much detail. Then I like to just go off off and do my own own thing with it. But, everyone has different angles on what they want to get out of a tab.

I guess the point I'm trying to make is you don't have to feel like the exact tab is something you really have to be doing EXACTLY. If you hit a wall with it, don't get overly frustrated. Let it sit in your head a while and if you're still interested swing back around later and take another stab at it.
#11
Quote by edg

Ultimately, even the best of tabbers are only guessing at the exact figurings and things, but I think some of the pro's get really really close to how something was actually played. I'll bet you they can even write it out way way better than the original guy played it could. Especially when it was improvised.


Yup. The pros do it for a living. They are very good at it. And sometimes they even have input from the original artists. One of the perks of working for a large publishing company, with the connections to meet and work with famous artists that comes from paying licensing fees to sell their music in printed form. A perk that nobody on a community site writing free tabs has. And sometimes they get heavily involved. The official tab book for Dream Theater's Metropolis Part 2 album, from Alfred publishing, was edited by John Petrucci, who also worked on the transcriptions himself, along with the guy from the company. It includes a little foreword from Petrucci, saying that the notes, and the fingerings themselves, are exactly the way he plays it.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#12
If I'm lazy, I"ll just go off the ratings and hope it works. If it doesn't, I'll check other tabs. If they're vastly different, that's when I stop being lazy and actually compare the tabs with the recordings. If that still doesn't work, I transcribe them myself.
#13
Quote by the_bi99man
I own and have learned from dozens of tab books by Alfred Publishing and Hal Leonard. They are flawless. The transcribers are professionals, who are way better at what they do than anyone publishing tabs on a community site like this. Maybe there are some "official" tab books that have errors. Maybe. I've never seen one. And so far, every example anyone has tried to show me of an official book being wrong, turned out that it was actually right, and that person was just misinterpreting something.


Oh ya, I owned 2 Hal Leonard tab book for Metallica's songs. They are awesome ! Sound just like what was actually played by them.
Amateur guitarist straight from the oven !