#1
I am just starting my pedal collection and I finally picked up a chorus pedal. I have been running it through my FX loop even though it makes for a more cluttered cable arrangement. Is running two ten foot cords through the effects loop cause any loss in tone? Or is the FX loop less vulnerable to tone loss because it is after the preamp? I was debating just putting the chorus after my overdrive to save some hassle. What are your thoughts?
ESP Iron Cross Sig model, Fernandes RetroRocket Sunburst, Taylor 214CE, Peavey XXX Super 40, DimeBag Crybaby from Hell, Zakk Wylde Overdrive, MXR Chorus, and a Flashback Delay and Looper.
#2
Couldn't you just try it both ways and tell yourself? It shouldn't be too bad, but it would depend more on the pedals than the cord
Peavey Classic 30
PRS SE Custom Semi-Hollow
+some pedals
#3
Depends on the loop and what's in it.

10' isn't too bad anyway.

A decent loop should have a decent low impedance buffer on the send anyway so that wouldn't be an issue. If you can end the loop with a pedal with a good buffer then that would address and loss on the return.

For the record I run two 20' cables, using my TC Trinity reverb in buffer mode at the end of the loop chain with very little if any noticeable loss.
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
#4
My new patch cords won't be here for a day or two. I guess, I could run a 10 footer in between the pedal. Do cords really even effect tone? Could I run a 100 foot cord and not tell a difference?
ESP Iron Cross Sig model, Fernandes RetroRocket Sunburst, Taylor 214CE, Peavey XXX Super 40, DimeBag Crybaby from Hell, Zakk Wylde Overdrive, MXR Chorus, and a Flashback Delay and Looper.
#5
After about 20 feet I think it starts to get some signal loss, that's why most guitar cables are 20 feet. Up to there I don't think it loses any signal.

I used a Arion Analog Delay through an effects loop for about 15 years (Peavey MX amp) and the only issue I had was I had to bring the delay level up a bit more than I did if I ran it inline. That didn't change whether I used 3 foot cables, which is what I normally used, or 20 footers. Otherwise it worked great and allowed me to run stereo guitar by sending the signal from one output jack of the Arion pedal back into the Peavey and the other to a PA amp on the other side of the stage. Since the effects loop is after the EQ and gain, I got the exact same sound, and once it was set anything I did to the main amp was duplicated on the other without touching it. Our bass player loved it, he could finally actually hear me well.

If you are only running the two pedals, I would out it in line with the other one in front of the amp, and not worry about the effects loop. I make up foot long patch cables if running separate pedals on the floor, and normally use a pedal board I made for onstage, same foot long cables. At band practice I still use my home soldered foot long patch cords, all I use is distortion pedal and volume pedal. No need for the entire board.

Try it both ways and see, but I think just running both in line with a short patch cable would be less hassle.
Hmmm...I wonder what this button does...
#6
Even a 20' cable loses a little bit of signal. I don't use more than 15' unless I absolutely have to. Fender makes cables at the seemingly arbitrary length of 18.6' because according to some study, that's exactly how long it can be before getting any signal loss. Of course, if you're only going a little bit over that, it's going to be minimal loss, and you may not even notice. And if any of the pedals in your chain has a good buffer, then it shouldn't matter anyway.

But yeah, 100' is a bit excessive, and I think you would definitely notice the signal loss at that point.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#7
Given the right buffer I could drive a guitar level signal through a 100' cable no issue providing it was a decent cable.

But your standard off the shelf stuff probably isn't going to do it. Ironically the cable would be the expensive part, not the buffer.
Epiphone Les Paul Plus Top
Jet City JCA5212RC (SLO Modded)
Ibanez WD7 Wah
Mad Professor Sweet Honey Overdrive
TC Electronic Flashback Triple Delay
TC Electronic Trinity Reverb
#8
Signal loss is going to happen proportionally for any length of cable, and the maximum lengths people recommend are driven by how noticeable it becomes. More of a concern might be treble loss due to the capacitance of the cable, which also increases with cable length. This is where the type and quality of the cable itself influences the result.

Buffering the signal before driving a long length of cable will reduce this effect and reduce the attenuation and treble losses (provided the buffer circuit has low impedance to drive the cable resistance and capacitance). Possibly you can buffer closer to your guitar and feed this to a longer cable to the amp.

Then, of course, many will say that the buffer circuitry will not sound as good as an unbuffered guitar signal (which is why true bypass switches are desirable).

I would rely on my own ears. If you get the sound you want or not is the real question.
#9
This is all good information. I was really interested in how much the cable can affect the signal. I haven't had much experience with all the cables that I am currently using. I might just throw the chorus out front so I don't have to worry about all the mess.
ESP Iron Cross Sig model, Fernandes RetroRocket Sunburst, Taylor 214CE, Peavey XXX Super 40, DimeBag Crybaby from Hell, Zakk Wylde Overdrive, MXR Chorus, and a Flashback Delay and Looper.
#10
The tone loss is pretty insignificant. You might experience a slight, slight loss in highs. If you use Boss pedals or something with a buffer in the loop, you'll be just fine. Either way, really, you'll be just fine.
Fender '72 Telecaster Deluxe RI
Schecter C-1 Artist II
1978 Music Man HD130
+ a bunch of neat pedals

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#11
Quote by tysona23
Is running two ten foot cords through the effects loop cause any loss in tone? Or is the FX loop less vulnerable to tone loss because it is after the preamp?


You're not going to lose LESS tone by running it through the FX loop (assuming you lose "tone").

You have the same issues with losses from connectors, the same capacitance issues, all that. There's nothing about the FX loop that makes it less vulnerable to any of it.
#12
Quote by dspellman
There's nothing about the FX loop that makes it less vulnerable to any of it.
I disagree. FX loops are frequently buffered, lower impedance, and sometimes run higher level signals. All of the those things make it less vunerable to loss than a low level high impedance signal typically found in front of an amp.