#1
I've got .011-.052 on my acoustic, but years ago I've bought by mistake .013-.056 and since I don't want to throw them away i figured out I can use them but keep them tuned down.
I was thinking at C# or C standard tuning, do you think I should go even lower for not damaging the guitar or the neck?

Edit. like having the same Kg like with the .011
Last edited by dekc at Oct 14, 2015,
#2
i suggest:

http://stringtensionpro.com/

plug in the values and all will be revealed. you can change gauges, tunings, scale lengths, and more. from this info you should be able to arrive at some answers.

find out the total tension when using your 11's, and adjust the tunings down with the heavier set to match the values from the 11's

your nut slots might not like having fatter strings stuffed in there and you may or may not have issues with your bridge and bridge pins.

fwiw i suggest just buying the set you want and give those old strings to a kid.
#3
Quote by dekc
I've got .011-.052 on my acoustic, but years ago I've bought by mistake .013-.056 and since I don't want to throw them away i figured out I can use them but keep them tuned down.
I was thinking at C# or C standard tuning, do you think I should go even lower for not damaging the guitar or the neck?

Edit. like having the same Kg like with the .011


I'm gonna guess D-d ought to do it. Lower than that, a standard scale guitar would likely get a bit sloppy. For C# and lower, you really need a baritone scale instrument
#4
I have used 13-56 in standard tuning for over fifty years on big (eg dread size) guitars, and this is the norm among 'grassers and common enough among other genres of acoustic players. However it has to be admitted that this causes long term (years to decades) deterioration of the geometry of most guitars. If you want to play safe, I would go to D standard, as suggested by CC for a compromise of feel, tone and safety margin. You can always go down again if it feels too tight.
#5
Like Tony Done says, lots of people use 13 gauge strings. I know a guy who uses 14 gauge - he's a nutter.

Obviously, the higher the gauge you use the more tension you will put on the guitar and hence shorten its life.

But, yes, standard D with 13's should be fine.
#6
to be fair, lots of people use 13s (most brands of guitar recommend a max of 12s), but many of them also need neck resets earlier.

i wouldn't even bother to use a set of strings that don't feel like i like strings to feel. unless you're so utterly stone-cold broke that you can't afford a $4 pack of strings, why not play what you like?
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#7
I've had this discussion in the Martin forum. Martin recommend medium as the maximum on some guitars, and lights (12s) on others, but the latter is apparently for tonal reasons, and using mediums on them would not void the warranty.

Many guitars (not the Martins mentioned above, and AFAIK some Taylors) ship with 12s because they are easier to play in the shop, but does this constitute a recommendation?
#8
Quote by Tony Done
...[ ]....Many guitars (not the Martins mentioned above, and AFAIK some Taylors) ship with 12s because they are easier to play in the shop, but does this constitute a recommendation?
After a fairly brief run through of Taylor's website, it seems to me they make a large part of their string gauge decisions, based on body shape and scale length. for example, the "Big Baby" ships with mediums due to a short scale.

Which is not to say that ease of play, (after all that's part of Taylor's hype), isn't factored in.

I think Ibanez does that with their electrics. I have an "ART-100", (a single cut Les Paul knock off), which came with "electric lights, (.009 to .042),. After playing acoustics and 12 strings, I couldn't get anything remotely resembling a coherent chord out of the damned thing. So, on went a set of regulars, (.010 to .046). Ah, much better... I can picture the young litterbugs at Guitar Center being overtly impressed with the same guitar with light strings, and buying it because it's "shredworthy". I couldn't keep the poopin' thing in tune with the lights...
#9
Quote by patticake
to be fair, lots of people use 13s (most brands of guitar recommend a max of 12s), but many of them also need neck resets earlier.

i wouldn't even bother to use a set of strings that don't feel like i like strings to feel. unless you're so utterly stone-cold broke that you can't afford a $4 pack of strings, why not play what you like?
The overarching issue is the down tuning. A somewhat less than mediocre singer be as I may, I have a bit trouble adjusting to vocal pitch when jumping from standard tuning to lowered tunings, given the same song.

This issue manifests itself on my 150e twelve'r. That's tuned to Eb. Because in spite of the fact Taylor claims you can tune their 12 strings to E-e, the guys in the advertising office don't have to play the damned things.

OK, my only point here is, normally overall tuning adjustments are done to favor a singer's range, not to use up unwanted string sets.
#11
Quote by Tony Done
^^^^ Capo!!!!

HTH.
Yeah but.... I shouldn't have injected a 12 string into the discussion. And yes, it would be much easier with a 6 string to pitch correct it after the capo is in place.

With a 12, it's no mean feat, and you should know that. If only for the fact that the longer capos with the "memory rubber", such as the planet Waves NS are in place, the more the tuning shifts as the rubber gets deeper dents in it. Plus, I see no way other than tuning with the capo in place, to correct the pitch differential between the prime and octave strings when fretted.

With a 6 string, you still have the issue of turning your 14 fret guitar into a 12 fretter, and the position markers are all screwed up. It's much worse though, when using a capo on the 1st fret.

I have undying respect for musician's who can pick up ten different guitars in 10 different tuning, and somehow get great music out of them. This rat was only able to learn the one maze, and now his brain cells are starting to harden off...

With the Taylor, I'm trying to maintain the open sound, instead of having it go away with a capo. I don't sing in front of people, so I guess it really doesn't matter...
Last edited by Captaincranky at Oct 15, 2015,