#1
I keep my guitar in its hard case usually. Curious if laying it in the case a certain way is preferable to another. Right now I have it laying flat. What about perpendicular? What part needs the most support?
#2
Support? This isn't a bra. It's a case. It's for protection. If your guitar needs support, something is wrong with it.

Any halfway decent case should be fine in nearly any geometry. Make sure the case is working properly, e.g. the headstock is not resting on any part of the case (it should float for Gibson styles) and that the case is sized properly so it's not crushing any switches. Some plastic or a protective sleeve can keep the frets and strings from oxidizing against the case interior, and lowering the humidity in the case can be beneficial especially if you are in a humid place, or near an ocean.

I suppose you wouldn't want the case flat on its front, that might push the strings and frets up against the case and should probably be avoided. Flat on its back or side, though, should be perfectly fine, and I doubt there's any real difference worth noting unless you've got a genuinely fragile museum piece.
#4
I lean it against the amp, I put it in the case and put it in the trunk, I take it out at the gig and lean it against the amp. #telelife
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#5
Quote by jpnyc
Don't point the headstock down. The end.

With a proper case, even that wouldn't be an issue, the instrument should be suspended by the body. Even if the case were too loose the headstock would usually just float free in most cases. Maybe a V would have issues in that instance.
#7
I have too many guitars to leave them all out so most of them stay in their cases when they are out of playing rotation. My jam room is rather small so I store the cases standing up leaning against a wall and "stack" them that way like this (//////) with the headstocks up this puts the center of gravity low so the cases are less likely to fall over if bumped.
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

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#8
I have 15 guitars and I keep them all out now -- hanging from walls or on stands. I've kept them in cases for long periods of time and generally as long its its up right its ok I think.

The biggest problem you might have to be aware of for storing in case for any length of time is humidity.

I have a 74 Gibson Super 400 that was in its case for maybe about 10 years without opening it. When I took it out, a lot of the metal had really corroded and the plastic pick guard was really warped. Fortunately, the damage was all repairable and it is now back in perfect shape. It's a good idea to take a look at it from time to time.

[EDIT]

The funny part of the story is that I had the case open when I was playing it and I think the cat pee'd in it. I thought I'd cleaned it out. But I think that there was some still left in there and the 10 years of it sitting in a cat pee mist was a really horrible thing to do. I really dodged a bullet on this because I would have cried if I'd really destroyed this classic guitar that I hope will find its way into someone else's hands some day.
Last edited by edg at Oct 15, 2015,
#10
Quote by edg


I have a 74 Gibson Super 400 that was in its case for maybe about 10 years without opening it. When I took it out, a lot of the metal had really corroded and the plastic pick guard was really warped. Fortunately, the damage was all repairable and it is now back in perfect shape. It's a good idea to take a look at it from time to time.

[EDIT]

The funny part of the story is that I had the case open when I was playing it and I think the cat pee'd in it. I thought I'd cleaned it out.


On a lot of those old guitars the pickguard is actually made of nitrocellulose (which is one of the first plastics). When nitrocellulose (lacquer OR solid) breaks down, it outgasses nitric and sulfuric acids and leaves behind a powdery substance (cellulose). The nitric and sulfuric acids attack and corrode the metal (even the pickup coil wire).

It's very possible that what you smelled was cat pee OR a combination of these acids (go sniff battery acid (sulfuric) and nitric acid just to make sure). One of the best ways to protect your guitars is to put a VCI emitter (Vapor Corrosion Inhibitor) in the case with the guitar. See theruststore.com for examples.