#1
I know Epiphone Les Pauls sound good enough to use live. Heck, even Squiers are fine for gigging. Are any of these cheap guitars good enough to use in the studio? We're making an EP, not a demo so it's gotta sound good.
#2
more about tha amps used than the guitars. if the guitar stays in tune adnd the pickups aren't to crappy then a good amp will make it sound at least decent and with a little studio magic even that Squier can sound like a custom shop axe.
#3
^^ This. I have a $180 LP Special 2 that I've modded (JB jazz PU in the neck, Grover tuners, new electronics, general setup) and I record my own stuff with it all the time. I have no doubt that it could hold its own in a professional studio environment.
#4
+1 to mono.

Honestly the only thing that would make an influence on the sound is the pickups(other than staying in tune of course).
Amp's more inportant.
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You can call me wrong, 'cause
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Fly on, fly on
#5
I want to use the quote about where a poor craftsman lays the blame, but I won't.

People have used "cheap" guitars to record for ages. Danelectros, Silvertones, etc. made their way onto iconic recordings.
Epiphone Les Paul Standard Pearl & Ebony • Les Paul PlusTop Pro Honeyburst • AJ220VS • Squier Standard Stratocaster CAR
Marshall Class 5 Combo • Digitech HT-2 • Vox V847 • MXR M68 Uni-Vibe • Soul Food • BOSS SD-1 • Digitech RV-7
#6
Lenny Kravitz has made millions of dollars from songs he recorded with inexpensive Epiphone guitars.
#7
Some guy named Jimmy Page recorded a song called Kashmir with a Danelectro, not too shabby!
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

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#8
For live gigs the amp is an important issue but what works for a live gig amp doesn't always translate to a studio environment. I can give two good examples.

(Jimmy Page 1st Zep album) "For the recordings, Page played a psychedelically painted Fender Telecaster, a gift from Jeff Beck after Page recommended his boyhood friend to the Yardbirds in 1965 as a potential replacement for Eric Clapton on lead guitar. This was a different guitar from those he favoured for later albums (most notably a Gibson Les Paul). Page played the Telecaster through a Supro amplifier." He used a Supro Dual tone, 24 watt single 12" speaker amp. It is also Steve Stevens first choice of amps in the studio.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Led_Zeppelin_(album)

Here's a quote from Joe Walsh in a Guitar World interview about what he uses in the studio: “I like small amps, not big ones. Another one I’m really fond of is Dr. Z amps. He’s a guy in Cleveland who makes these really great amps. Brad Paisley and I are both really in love with those. And I love Fender Champs, too. An old blackface Champ is actually what I did ‘Funk #49’ on. A blackface Champ and a Tele, straight in.”

I remember seeing how many really good players would drag in a a beautiful Marshall stack or half stack to the studio I worked at, then complain about not being happy with the sound they were getting on the recordings. Many times they would end up using one of the smaller amps that studio owned like a Fender Deluxe Reverb (a very popular choice) or an old Boogie. Not my choice for great live amps but both had an awesome fat sound when recorded. Stick a Shure 57 in front of one of those amps and you were good to go most of the time.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Oct 15, 2015,
#9
Quote by Angry fat man
I know Epiphone Les Pauls sound good enough to use live. Heck, even Squiers are fine for gigging. Are any of these cheap guitars good enough to use in the studio? We're making an EP, not a demo so it's gotta sound good.

It comes down to the player not the instrument.

If the guitar stays in tune and the intonation is correct then you'll be fine. I recorded 8-9 songs with my old band using a Epiphone G-400 over my PRS because it was set up correct for that type of music.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#10
It ain't the meat it's the motion
That makes your mama wanna rock

....Maria Muldaur.

Nobody can tell what you paid for the guitar when you rip off a great guitar bit.
#11
Check out the Epiphone Ultra series Les Pauls. They have USB sockets and and I believe an onboard nanomag pickup, with separate mono/stereo jacks. I haven't looked at too many reviews, but they are specifically designed for modern studeo use. Otherwise, at really all depends on your amp/interface and recording skills.
#12
You are right about the newer Ultra III Epi's. The original Ultra's (version I and II) do not have the USB. It started on the Ultra III and the III also has a tuner built into the pickups outer ring. It's a very light chambered Les Paul with the acoustic Nanomag pickup (Mine only weighs 7.5 lbs.). I have the Ultra II and it's nice.
Attachments:
Tuner[1].jpg
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Oct 16, 2015,
#13
Quote by Rickholly74
It's a very light chambered Les Paul with the acoustic Nanomag pickup (Mine only weighs 7.5 lbs.).


Stop now. I just got paid and you’re making me want to get in the car and drive down to Wildwood.
#14
Wildwood? No too far from me. I'm on the other end of the state.
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
#15
Maybe not your cup of tea but i recently got my hand on a schecter omen 6 (not the extreme version) and i am really amazed. Still a beginner but i have one friend who been playing for 25+ years and with a little setup and quality string he was really amazed and felt in love with my schecter. My friend only have quality guitar (gibson les paul/sg, fender american strat, prestige ibanez). Its more of a metal guitar but it work really well for blues and classic rock too. Great sound stock