#1
This past year I discovered what good music is & threw my schecter down to c tuning. She's been that way for a solid 2+ months now. This past week I stumbled across some cool scales & playing styles for stoner rock in standard... I just got a new set of ernie ball colbolt power slinky's (11, 14, 18p, 28, 38, 48) so I'm set in string gauge but the question is, after all this time of being in a custom tuning would it effect the neck at all? I'm also running a FR tremolo if that has any contributing factors.
Any input would be appreciated
Last edited by sdxpandah at Oct 15, 2015,
#2
the neck and floyd would have to be adjusted for the new tuning. going up in tuning will put more tension on the neck which if isnt corrected will result in neck bow and intonation issues. you'll also find that your floyd will be pulled forward which will screw up tuning etc.
#3
thought that might be the case... i can take off the back plate & adjust the spring tension accordingly no prob but i was wondering if in doing so would it generally mess with the guitar as a whole...
#4
Quote by sdxpandah
thought that might be the case... i can take off the back plate & adjust the spring tension accordingly no prob but i was wondering if in doing so would it generally mess with the guitar as a whole...


well you could if you totally don't know what you are doing but with a little research you should be able to manage just fine. the floyd is the easier part adjusting the neck can be tricky when you first start doing it. the other thing is string guage which in standard tuning is pretty heavy and will make things like bends tougher.
#5
gotcha... haven't really had to adjust the neck yet, I'll look into it thanks man
#6
If the tension is comparable (i.e. you'll use lighter strings, not 13s or something) then absolutely nothing bad should happen, but as monbowobbo already said, you'll most likely have to do a bit of setup.

Also what good music are we talking? "Good music" and "C tuning" = Katatonia to me.
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#7
Like others have said it won't hurt it but you will need the Floyd floating bridge to be set,the saddle will need adjusted, perhaps the truss rod and probably the action too.Once its all done stick to that tuning and stick to the guage of strings you choose as the Floyd is not designed to be continually changed to different tunings.
#8
You shouldn't have an issue. Changing tuning/gauge will in no way damage it. Just reset the Floyd, check intonation etc. and the bridge will be fine. Adjust the truss rod if you think it needs it.
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#9
NAh.

I'd personally get myself a nice cheap used guitar if you're planning to be in Standard for not too long, like some used Epi V or something similar. But if money's a problem then you wouldn't have massive problems with changing the stuff on your guitar
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#10
Quote by sdxpandah
This past year I discovered what good music is


do tell...
#11
Quote by sdxpandah
This past year I discovered what good music is & threw my schecter down to c tuning.


If I remember correctly there was a huge amount of good music made before (during and after) the downtune revolution.
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#13
Yeah, quite a few rock and metal bands tuned down since Black Sabbath started doing it (can't comment on other genres much, though), which was almost 50 years ago. Mostly Meshuggah started the concept of uber low F# and below tunings, but e.g. in death metal tunings like B and lower were happening already in the early 90s.
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#14
damn. i need to get out more.
Last edited by ad_works at Oct 15, 2015,
#15
https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?t=614226

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#16
Quote by ad_works
i've been tuned down a whole step for 33 years. what revolution?


Quote by TheLiberation
Yeah, quite a few rock and metal bands tuned down since Black Sabbath started doing it (can't comment on other genres much, though), which was almost 50 years ago. Mostly Meshuggah started the concept of uber low F# and below tunings, but e.g. in death metal tunings like B and lower were happening already in the early 90s.


I'm 46 and been playing 30+ years myself, my point is that typically it is metal bands that tune down to the really low tunings, this didn't really become "common" until the mid to late 90's along with 7 strings etc. Yes there were bands doing it prior, Iommi tuned to C or C sharp (I don't remember) for Into The Void on Master of Reality, but from my recollection it was far from common.


My original reply was a fair statement I believe as plenty of great hard rock and metal was made in the 70's, 80's and early 90's Maybe the word "revolution has been taken too literally"
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
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Live my twisted dream
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#17
Quote by Evilnine
I'm 46 and been playing 30+ years myself, my point is that typically it is metal bands that tune down to the really low tunings, this didn't really become "common" until the mid to late 90's along with 7 strings etc. Yes there were bands doing it prior, Iommi tuned to C or C sharp (I don't remember) for Into The Void on Master of Reality, but from my recollection it was far from common.


My original reply was a fair statement I believe as plenty of great hard rock and metal was made in the 70's, 80's and early 90's Maybe the word "revolution has been taken too literally"

About black sabbath's tuning, Iommi tuned to C sharp for some time in the 60/70's and later on mainly to E flat. To this day most of the stuff is E flat.
Well, you can call me crazy
You can call me wrong, 'cause
See I was born a liar, albatross
Fly on, fly on
#18
Quote by Evilnine
Maybe the word "revolution has been taken too literally"


Or maybe it was used inaccurately in the first place .

Alternate tunings, including downtunings, are old hat. You may *hear* about them more on guitar forums these days because the newbs in their bedrooms can sound like their favorite metal bands with just two fingers and a lot of distortion.

If there's a minor revolution, it's this:

Rondo Music (dot com) and a few other importers have been making extended range guitars, which were formerly custom-order only, available at very high quality at very *normal* prices. So now we see 7, 8, 9 and even 10-string guitars, with scales of 25.5", 27", 28.65" and even 30", and even multi-scale (fan-fret) guitars *with and without trems* selling for under $1000. That makes it possible for a lot more players to jump in on a trial basis.

Amps, unfortunately, really haven't caught up (seriously, what are they thinking offering an open-back combo as a "metal" amp). But modelers easily fill in.
#19
Quote by Fryderyczek
About black sabbath's tuning, Iommi tuned to C sharp for some time in the 60/70's and later on mainly to E flat. To this day most of the stuff is E flat.


not to sure about this. 1st 2 albums standard tuning. then down to C# for the rest of the 70s. with Dio i believe he went up to D for many of the songs. prety sure most recent album is back to C# for ozzy who can't sing in high registers.
#20
Quote by ad_works
do tell...

simply put, stoner rock opposed to metalcore (no offence to coreheads, just not as tasty anymore)
#21
Bob Dylan used drop C in 1965-66. There are classical players using a wide variety of C tunings.

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