#1
Pretty much what the title says. He says that it sounds way to "Happy" for him. I personally like that song very much (aside from the fact that I wrote it). A lot of my friends seem to enjoy that song too.
What do I do? I don't wanna find a new bassist just because of such a small problem.
#2
He could afford to just grow up and play it anyways. Slash hated sweer child o mine and if he refused to play it GnR might not have had the same success. It easily their most popular song.
#4
try to incorporate some of his input into it, maybe throw a minor key bridge or something in there. i've found that adding another persons perspective can make a good song even better. or it could make it worse, either way, worth a try
#5
Quote by gooooog
its always about compromise, unless you all hate each others guts


Definitely not always. If a band has four members and everyone wants to be a part of the creation process, compromising might lead to shitty incomprehensible songs. A strong band needs a figure of authority.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#6
What do the other band members think about the song? Is it completely different style than your other songs?

No, don't kick out the bassist. That would be ridiculous. Not liking a song that you wrote is not a reason to kick somebody out. Even considering that is ridiculous.

Remember that you don't need to play every song you write with your band. If it doesn't fit your band's style, you don't have to play it. Save it for your solo career or future bands or whatever.

Quote by ryancide
try to incorporate some of his input into it, maybe throw a minor key bridge or something in there. i've found that adding another persons perspective can make a good song even better. or it could make it worse, either way, worth a try

This too. (But of course if that makes the song worse, you don't have to use it.)


It's just one song. You don't have to play it if the band doesn't like playing it. A lot of bands write more songs than they release. Some songs just don't work for the band.

For example every time Kiss started recording a new album, Gene Simmons wrote like 100 new songs, out of which the band picked like four that they preferred. IIRC, this is what Ace said so I don't know how much truth there is behind that (I'm sure he's at least exaggerating a bit).
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
Last edited by MaggaraMarine at Oct 16, 2015,
#7
Quote by Kevätuhri
Definitely not always. If a band has four members and everyone wants to be a part of the creation process, compromising might lead to shitty incomprehensible songs. A strong band needs a figure of authority.


From what I got out of his statement, or at least my first thought that came to mind, was that the bassist should be the one to be able to compromise, not necessarily have everybody be allowed to throw their spin into the song.
#8
I think the one who writes the song should decide which parts work and which don't, but I think everybody should listen to each other. So if the bassist has an idea to improve the song, listen to him, but in the end it's your song, you decide what it sounds like.

So I think you should (kind of) allow everybody to throw their spin into the song in a way - you should listen to their opinions and if they have some improvement ideas. But of course you should also have the last word when it comes to the songs you wrote.

But yeah, not everybody can always be 100% happy with everything. If all of the other band members like the song, the bassist is the one that needs to compromise. But if you are the only one that likes the song, maybe it's not the right song for your band.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#9
Quote by esky15
From what I got out of his statement, or at least my first thought that came to mind, was that the bassist should be the one to be able to compromise, not necessarily have everybody be allowed to throw their spin into the song.


Probably. But I didn't address the matter in this thread directly.

Quote by Mag
So I think you should (kind of) allow everybody to throw their spin into the song in a way - you should listen to their opinions and if they have some improvement ideas.


Absolutely. I might have phrased my point wrong. What I'm saying is that there might come a point where the differences are irreconcilable, and there has to be a person who can say the final word. Otherwise, a petty argument between stubborn bandmates might break up the band.

To TS, I agree with Mag here, don't even consider kicking him out. If the rest of the band wants to play the song, it is the bassist that needs to compromise. If it's only between you two, find a solution that fits both.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here