#1
I have Squier VM Precision bass at the moment, but I don't really like it's slap tone, so I'm going to sell it and replace with other bass. Apart from that, I'm looking for sth more versatile - P-bass has only one pickup, it's passive so I can't get many tones out of it.

I play mostly funk, rock, jazz, blues. I'm considering a Jazz Bass, it has two pickups, sounds great in slapping and it's very versatile. Many people recommend Sterling Sub Rays basses. What about Cort GB74? It has both MM and J pickups, with an option to split humbucker.
#2
The Squier Classic Vibe Jazz is, hands down, the best bass in this price category by far. You might need to stretch your budget to fit but it'll be worth it.

The other basses are definitely worth looking into as well. Cort are pretty damn good these days (they make everyone else's basses) and MM Sub too but I'd be very wary of any active basses in this price range.
#3
I definitely can buy CV Jazz Bass for the price. I see...well, maybe you're right.

Actually, what are the advantages of having preamp onboard? Apart from EQ-ing... I don't think that I need onboard preamp if I already have a preamp in my amplifier?
#4
Onboard EQs tend to be for slight adjustments, most often to account for the room you're playing it. They can add a nice colour to your sound too, like the East Preamp, but will more often than not sound utter shite with a lot of background noise when you get one on a cheap bass.

Active pickups, on the other hand, are great. They're a low output pickup that gets its signal boosted by a battery so it can have fewer winds. This means it will have a lot more clarity in the high end and almost no noise. Obviously EMG are the most common example of this sound.
#5
But is it useful when you already have good and precise EQ in your amp?

I'm asking, because I heard that active basses generally have problems with noises when bass and/or treble are boosted, and they sort of 'compress' the sound of passive pickups - or just decrease dynamics. But many people loves that active tone.

I've never been been convinced to active bass pups. I saw a concert of SMV (Stanley Clarke, Marcus Miller and Victor Wooten), Clarke and Wooten had active pups and sounded really tiny. Clear, but tiny. Marcus sound was really much more pleasant to my ears - low mids and mids were more there, and it just sounded full.
#6
^If Marcus was using his Fender, it's got passive pups and an 18v active preamp.

I've also personally never had a problem with dynamics or noise when it comes to my own bass, which has passive pups and an active pre, nor any of the issues you've described with my previous all active bass. Nor with any other similar bass I've tried. The key here is not the pickups, but the quality of the preamp. Active pickups use smaller magnets so won't pick up as much interference as passive. Every component afterwards though brings in opportunity for interference. As I said, a good quality, well designed preamp will introduce an inaudible level of noise to the signal.
#7
I read somewhere that Marcus used to use his onboard preamp in the late 70's, because of a lot of recording sessions - it was more comfortable than having a big amplifier and transporting it. But since he uses SWR preamp on stage, he does not use his onboard preamp. But Fender MM signature guitars still have those preamps. That's what i heard, but I'm nots sure

I guess you're right, though I'm not sure if I can find a good preamp in budget guitars.
#9
Quote by Spaz91
The Squier Classic Vibe Jazz is, hands down, the best bass in this price category by far. You might need to stretch your budget to fit but it'll be worth it.


Agree with Spaz91 on the Squier Classic Vibe Jazz. I would stay away from Sterling Sub basses. I've played them in my local music store and they are priced low for a reason. Materials and build quality is low IMHO.
#10
I'm surprised it's not mentioned yet but Ibanez basses have a great slap tone to them and are great in overall playability. They have a pretty high quality line-up for their low end basses, even though Squire JBs are decent and have great value they're just too overshadowed by the Fender JBs.

Have a look at Ibanez's stuff for this price you can get a good overall bass with great versatility and good slap tone.
how do you edit signature?
#11
i've played sterling SUB ray4 basses at six guitar centers, and none of the ones i played had quality issues. i found the ones i played to be higher quality than most squiers, and i'm a big squier fan, and the tone from the SUB ray4 basses was delicious.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#12
I have a VM PJ bass and a pair of SBMM SUBs (one 4 string and the other 5) and they're all about the same quality but I feel that the tuners on the SUBs are a little better and the preamp means that they're a lot more versatile too.
Other than that, you couldn't really go wrong with either.

I'd look into Ibanezes too. I had an SR305 and an SR370 and again, both really good quality. The only difference between the SR30x and the SR37x is the body material.
#13
Cort, Squier, SubRay, Ibanez.. All looks good.

Nice conversation on EQ's and Active Pups. Will not say that I agreed at all.

Between the 4 contenders above, there will be two differences that matter.

1. The Neck Profile
2. The look. for getting the gig.

For me, I generally nix the Squier/Fender Design because of the G string stability problem that caused Leo to redesign the headstock to stabilize the G String on the Sting Ray.

You might love the necks on the Ibby or the Cort, but in the end, if it does not have the look for the traditionalist that have infested the rock music scene, you will not get the gig.

For me, the Rays keep losing out on being a bass I will play because of the neck profile being bat-ish. Shame. That tone dominated the 90's,

If image does not matter, find a used Ibanez BTB 405 or 455, that will blister.
Ibanez BTB 1006 Fretless and 405 (no Barts)
456 & 455(w/Barts)
Genz Benz NeoX400 112T & NeoX 112T cab.
Digitech BP-8 (x2)
Yamaha PB-1
Boss: SYB-5, PS-2, OD-20, EQ-20, PH-3,BF-3, CE-20, DD-20
Morely A/B
#15
I am not inclined to agree on the alleged compression and noise issues.

There will be bad designs.
There will be bad units from the factory.
Heck, there will even be bad batteries!

The only thing that matters first is, do you like how it sounds, then second, can you make others like how it sounds.

After that, everything else is a matter of engineering opinion.

My dad had a guitar player whose amp broke one night. He could not stand the noise it was making and had to send the guy off the stage.

Much to my dad's amazement, entire careers, an industry and product lines have sprouted up upon making guitar amps sound broken.
Ibanez BTB 1006 Fretless and 405 (no Barts)
456 & 455(w/Barts)
Genz Benz NeoX400 112T & NeoX 112T cab.
Digitech BP-8 (x2)
Yamaha PB-1
Boss: SYB-5, PS-2, OD-20, EQ-20, PH-3,BF-3, CE-20, DD-20
Morely A/B
#16
The question is, whether I need a preamp or not? I already have one in my amp, so...

When it comes to guitars, Squier CV Jazz Bass looks like a good deal.

How does the stability problem on J-basses look like?
Last edited by hokus_pokus at Oct 18, 2015,
#17
Quote by hokus_pokus
The question is, whether I need a preamp or not? I already have one in my amp, so...

When it comes to guitars, Squier CV Jazz Bass looks like a good deal.

How does the stability problem on J-basses look like?


You definitely don't need one, but there's no reason to turn an otherwise good bass down because it has one.
Decide you don't need it? Keep everything centred and just play with the volume
When I record, I technically go through 4 different preamps (onboard, Sansamp, interface, virtual), so just the bass and the amp isn't a lot really.

Generally you'd use it for on the fly tweaks or just as a tone shaping feature (same purpose as a tone knob or an EQ pedal). On my Stingrays, I keep them set with a slight bass and treble boost just because it suits my tone preference.

The CV Jazz is a very good deal. Not entirely sure what you mean by stability problems. I mean, are we talking build quality or neck dive? Both should be fine.
#18
The CV Jazz is a very good deal. Not entirely sure what you mean by stability problems. I mean, are we talking build quality or neck dive? Both should be fine.


Sliide90027 wrote that there's a G-string stability problem on Jazz Basses.