#4
Quote by cdgraves
It's Em, but 1) you should work this stuff out on your own and 2) don't use the capo just to avoid barre chords.


Why? Are you being 1) constructive and paternal? If so, "I know I know". Or are you 2) being a jerk? If so, screw you too, buddy... (some people. Harrumpfh)
But if 1): How? The "transpo map" I found doesn't even mention Gm...


http://www.guitar-chord.org/transposition-chart-for-capo.html
#5
A capo on the third fret just means that all of the chords are out by three semitones. Hence, it says: Cm = Am ; Bb = G ; Eb = C. Gm reduced by three semitones is Em (One semitone less is F#m and two semitones less is Fm).

I think that cdgraves was just pointing out that this is very easy to work out, and that its important to learn the basics of theory for understanding stuff like this. Also, that transposition chart does mention Gm on the second from last column, but it is invaluable to know how this stuff works as opposed to using a lookup table.
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#6
Quote by AnrBjotk
Why? Are you being 1) constructive and paternal? If so, "I know I know". Or are you 2) being a jerk? If so, screw you too, buddy... (some people. Harrumpfh)
But if 1): How? The "transpo map" I found doesn't even mention Gm...


http://www.guitar-chord.org/transposition-chart-for-capo.html


As long as you are relying on anything but yourself for basic chords, the advice is entirely constructive. Seeing as you hadn't found an answer online in over 8 hours since asking your question, I'd say the internet is neither an efficient nor reliable resource for this information.

You can work this stuff out by learning how to construct your basic scales and chords. Once you know what notes go into an Em and a Gm chord, the capo transposition is a very simple thing to figure out.
Last edited by cdgraves at Oct 19, 2015,
#7
Thanks guys.

See, I read the chart like if you want to play an Em, it will become a Gm with a capo on the third. But you're saying that it's: if you want to play an Gm, it is a Em with a capo on third... That's confusing.

I DO want to learn. I guess there are books. I took guitar lessons for four years, from when I was 14. But I never practiced and was never even taught stuff like that. Just taught to read and memorize tablatures.

As for barres. I just cant do them. Physically. My fingers, I think, REALLY are too short. I can only play an F with four fingers placed like between an Am and a C. I'm sorry...
#9
Quote by AnrBjotk
Thanks guys.

See, I read the chart like if you want to play an Em, it will become a Gm with a capo on the third. But you're saying that it's: if you want to play an Gm, it is a Em with a capo on third... That's confusing.

I DO want to learn. I guess there are books. I took guitar lessons for four years, from when I was 14. But I never practiced and was never even taught stuff like that. Just taught to read and memorize tablatures.

As for barres. I just cant do them. Physically. My fingers, I think, REALLY are too short. I can only play an F with four fingers placed like between an Am and a C. I'm sorry...

It looks like you already have the understanding required to answer your own question. You just need to be able to internalize the thinking from the other perspective.

As for barres... The general consensus is that unless you have something that can be or has been diagnosed by a physician, it is never a reason for not being able to play them.

I mean no offence, but it seems like your four years of guitar lessons weren't very good. Anyone can read and memorize tabs. It's also the reason why you're more than 4 years into guitar playing and still not able to play barres.
#10
Thanks. Yeah, I'm starting to think my teacher was a hack. Then again, as I said, I never practiced, so it's at least 50/50.

But look at this video :
Will's clearly playing with a capo, and it sure looks like the same chords as here . I cant imagine Will Oldham avoiding barre chords... But maybe that's a different use of a capo.

By the by, if anyone is feeling generous: What is his playing style here? It looks, and sounds like, he's playing the chords, but instead of strumming he's plucking three or more strings, with occasional finger picking here and there. Is that it? It doenst sound right when I try the same...
#11
Some open string chord voicings can't be replicated with a barre, so a capo would be appropriate if you really want that voicing.

I didn't see any fancy fretwork in that video, and it looked like the guy's main thing was songwriting, so it's also entirely possible that he just uses the capo to play the same chord shapes in different keys. For guitarists, that's a crutch, but it's pretty normal for songwriters.

His technique is pretty much generic fingerpicking, I don't think he was using any specific kind there. Just listen for when he hits the lower notes (thumb) and higher notes (fingers).
Last edited by cdgraves at Oct 27, 2015,
#12
Quote by cdgraves
Some open string chord voicings can't be replicated with a barre, so a capo would be appropriate if you really want that voicing.

I didn't see any fancy fretwork in that video, and it looked like the guy's main thing was songwriting, so it's also entirely possible that he just uses the capo to play the same chord shapes in different keys. For guitarists, that's a crutch, but it's pretty normal for songwriters.

His technique is pretty much generic fingerpicking, I don't think he was using any specific kind there. Just listen for when he hits the lower notes (thumb) and higher notes (fingers).


But is he really fingerpicking? It sounds like several strings plucked at once...no?
#14
Quote by cdgraves
I mean, he's not using a pick, so it's fingerpicking of some sort. He's using his index and middle fingers to pluck the higher strings.


Mm, yes. But I'm trying to figure out if he's e and b string alternatly and then picking the lower strings... or whether it's just the e string and then lower three... He does the same on a radio spot version of Stable Will, and again, I can't tell.
He plays a Em at several points, so surely he would hit the b string... (otherwise it would be pointless to do the chord... even with capo, no?)
#15
Well he didn't look like a virtuoso exactly, so he may not be hitting things consistently every time. Might just have to use your ears and listen for what sounds right.

Either way, it's folk music, so I think you'll be fine whether you voice the chords fully or not.