#1
i recently started working on setting up my own guitar's, now i'm thinking about buying Stewmac's nut files, the thing is that i dont know wich one's to order..

do i need specific file(width) for every single nut or how does it work?
I have one guitar wich is setup for 0.11- 0.49 all my other guitar's are on 0.10 - 0.46

these are the file width's to choose from:

0.010" width
0.013" width
0.016" width
0.020" width
0.024" width
0.028" width
0.032" width
0.035" width
0.042" width
0.046" width
0.050" width
0.056" width
#3
Quote by Explorerbuilder
Yes, you pretty much need one for every string. Get the ones that are about .02-.03 bigger than each string.


Alright, is it also possible to cut a 0.011 nut slot with a 0.010 file ?

for example, if i were to cut a .017 nut slut would it be better to use a smaller or wider file

they dont sell .017 files at stewmac's website so it would be a 0.016 file or a 0.020
#4
Check out the guitar setup kit with nut files on Ebay. Three files with six string sizes. Better than the torch files. Nice set.
#6
Quote by Explorerbuilder
You dont want to make an 11 slot for a 11 gauge string. It needs to be bigger.

This.
If you had slots exactly the same size as the string, you'd get tuning issues because the string would stick in the nut.

A 13, 16, 20, 28, 42, and 50 set should do the job for both sets of string gauges.
#7
i use 4 double edged tapered files. .012/.020, .026/.032, .036/.042, .050/.060

you could also use gaged saws as well.
Last edited by ad_works at Oct 19, 2015,
#8
Quote by Explorerbuilder
Yes, you pretty much need one for every string. Get the ones that are about .02-.03 bigger than each string.


incorrect. if needed, odd sizes are done by tilting the closest sized file to the left and right when working the slot. it's better to start smaller then to start bigger and blow it -then you'll be making another nut.

checking is done with pin gages or the desired strings themselves. full dia. depth on the plain strings, radius depth on the wound strings. easy peasy.

.002 to .003 (max) larger is correct for slot width. add an extra zero to your decimals or you'll confuse people. remember you still need to polish out the slots and this will remove material too.
Last edited by ad_works at Oct 19, 2015,
#9
Quote by ad_works
incorrect. if needed, odd sizes are done by tilting the closest sized file to the left and right when working the slot. it's better to start smaller then to start bigger and blow it -then you'll be making another nut.

checking is done with pin gages or the desired strings themselves. full dia. depth on the plain strings, radius depth on the wound strings. easy peasy.

.002 to .003 (max) larger is correct for slot width. add an extra zero to your decimals or you'll confuse people. remember you still need to polish out the slots and this will remove material too.

That doesnt make it "incorrect" because there are different ways of doing it. I wouildnt recommend that method for a beginner.
#10
Quote by Explorerbuilder
That doesnt make it "incorrect" because there are different ways of doing it. I wouildnt recommend that method for a beginner.


nor would i recommend a beginner use an on-size file for their first project either. the first thing that they do is cut the slots crooked and off center and at weird angles because they haven't learned to control the files. starting off with a smaller file is a more practical solution until the beginner gets some experience with the tools and the work.
#11
It also depends on what stage you are starting.

If you are making a new nut, I have used thinner files at first to get the spacing and angle straight and correct and then work up to the correct width for each string (I usually start with the thinnest file to get the alignment correct for all strings, being careful to not go as deep as the final height, and then use one or two gradually thicker files to get the correct width at that centre, and finally go for the correct height.

If you are simply lowering the string height on an already-made nut, then you must start with the correct width.