#1
I need something chock full of exercises because my guitar mechanics suck and my hands get tired all the fucking time. I'm looking to get into death metal which needs a shitload of dexterity and stamina.

Is there a huge compendium of exercises I can buy? The kind which renders any other guitar exercise book purchases obsolete?
#2
Quote by ingames
Is there a huge compendium of exercises I can buy? The kind which renders any other guitar exercise book purchases obsolete?


Yeah, you can get one for free. It's called the internet.

Seriously, if mechanical speed/accuracy building exercises are what you're looking for, you don't need a book. All of the exercises you'll ever need can be found with a google search.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#3
Quote by Kevätuhri
Yeah, you can get one for free. It's called the internet.

Seriously, if mechanical speed/accuracy building exercises are what you're looking for, you don't need a book. All of the exercises you'll ever need can be found with a google search.


Exercises can be looked up, but a progressive method is much harder to find for free online.

Technique is a pretty standard thing - if you go to a guitar store you're likely to find a dozen books on technique. They'll all say the same thing, so just browse until you find a book that you connect with.

And the key is your own discipline. Work from your book every day and in sequence. Don't skip stuff because you think you know it already or don't think you'll ever need it.
#5
Exercises can be really helpful for nailing techniques that you're struggling with but just blindly playing exercises from a book or going online and looking up exercises won't be that helpful; chances are the problem you have is a specific one that can't be tackled by blindly playing generic exercises from the internet.

The best thing to do is to work out exactly what you need to work on - maybe record yourself and slow it down and really listen to where you're going wrong. Then make your own exercises to tackle the specific problem you're encountering. For example, if you struggle with inside picking, make an exercise that focuses solely on that. You can have some fun with it too by trying to make it somewhat musical (although I personally do find that some chromatic exercises can *occasionally* be useful).

Also - your initial post reads like you're trying to use exercises as a way to improve stamina in the same way that you'd go to the gym to improve your general fitness. That's not really how guitar works, it's more of a mental challenge than a physical one. Yes, there is a degree of hand strength/stamina involved (and anyone that denies that has likely played enough that it feels like they're not putting in much physical effort when they're playing) but that's not really what the exercises are for - they're for highlighting specific flaws in your technique.

From what you said in your initial post, it sounds like you've probably got too much tension when you're playing. I realise that's a pretty general answer that's flung around a lot around here but that's because it's true. If your left hand is getting tired, make sure that when you fret notes you're not applying an unnecessary amount of pressure on the strings. Launch your fingers onto the fret, that's fine, but it only requires a very small burst of energy. You only need to trigger your finger to fly down and hit that note, once it's on it's way down, it's on it's way down. Once the note is fretted, don't maintain any more pressure than is necessary. Same kinda thing with the right hand. You can hit a string pretty damn hard with very little effort from your right hand. Slow it down a bit and practise hitting the string as loud as you can but with as little energy expenditure and as little tension as possible. That's not saying you should hit really hard all the time (it's very rare that you'll need to hit the string "as hard as you can", and, er, try not to break anything), but it's helpful for when you do want to hit the string hard. If you can hit the string hard and have it feel virtually effortless, then you should no longer have any issues with tension in your right hand.
ESP Horizon FR II (EMG) / Ibanez Prestige RG1570 (DiMarzio Crunch Lab & LiquiFire pickups)