#1
Hi all,

I had originally decided I was looking for a five-string. Now I'm not so sure. My budget of £300-350 is a bit low to be looking at any quality five-strings, although the SBMM Stingray SUB 5 did appeal to me at first. Anyway, I'm looking for a new bass with a little help from my parents at Christmas, and as I said, I can fork out up to £350 but no more.

So, the options I've looked at so far are:

Schecter Omen Extreme-4
Schecter Omen 5 2012
Squier Vintage Modified Jazz Bass V
Squier Vintage Modified Precision PJ (both P and J pickups like my current bass)
SBMM Stingray SUB Ray 5
Ibanez SR375

Anyone else got any opinions. I don't really know exactly what sound I'm looking for, so I guess something a little versatile would be good. I am currently trying to get better at slap bass, other than that I tend to play quite melodic bass lines with a traditional clean bass sound (a little like a Fender Jazz but I obviously can't afford one). My current bass is just...bad. It's got one broken pickup, the setup is all wrong (I tried to do it myself and failed miserably, next bass is going straight to a music shop to be set up) and the volume knob has partially stopped working.

If you need any more detail into what I want, just let me know. I'm completely open to criticism and would love it if anyone has any other suggestions that are better than what I have found.

Woody
#2
If I were you I would look for something with active pickups. I'm sure you could find something in your range. Five strings are nic but not usually necessary
#3
go used. your budget can potentially double, in a sense.
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#4
Quote by Hail
go used. your budget can potentially double, in a sense.


I'd love to get a £700 bass from my money, but as this bass isn't going to be bought right now, I have no idea what instruments will be on the market when I do. And it's hardly fair if I see a bass I like, to tell the seller "Oh we'll buy it off you at Christmas. Could you keep it until then?"

Also, I don't see many used basses around for my budget. All of them are either crap basses that people are trying to get rid of for less than £100, or they're from 'murica and I'll need to pay a good £100 shipping. Not much on basschat.co.uk that I like the looks of either.

Woody
Last edited by Bassmania127 at Oct 20, 2015,
#5
Okay the Ibanez SR375-BBW looks pretty great for my needs. It's very versatile with a wide range of sounds from its active 3-band EQ, is a five string, and fits nicely into my budget at £325. Not to mention it's one of the best looking basses in the list IMO. Any opinions on this bass?

Woody
#6
i like ibanez. i definitely prefer their BTBs, but i had a friend with i believe the SR475 when i was playing latin cover stuff and it definitely got the job done and looked and sounded nice.
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#7
i liked the ibanez when i tried it out, but then i'm a big fan of their soundgear basses, and i believe you can't go wrong with them if you like the neck (which i do). that being said, the SUB ray 4 would be the one i'd get - i see a few board complaints about QC, but every one i've played was stupendous - loud, great and versatile tones, awesome neck the squiers are both good basses - i've played 'em both. i haven't played those particular schector models, so no real opinion.
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#8
The Squier Vintage Jazz/P-bass or the Ibanez would be my first picks from the choices you have listed. But keep in mind this is based on my personal preference.
#9
Practice doing setups on your current bass. Do them until you get the playability where you want it. While you're doing them, take notes - find the measurements that feel good to you. I've seen some setup directions out of order. The proper procedure is: tune, adjust truss rod, re-tune, double check truss (a.k.a. neck relief), re-tune if you made another adjustment to the truss, adjust bridge saddles height (action), re-tune, adjust intonation - sharp, move saddles toward bridge; flat, move saddles toward neck - re-tune, adjust pickups, done. Some people use the comparison between 12th harmonics and open notes to check intonation. I've always used the fretted note and open notes. Harmonics are affected by intonation.

I've saved a ton of money over the years and learned exactly how I like my basses setup by doing them myself. My friends were thrilled, too. First one took an hour and a half. Now, I can do all 7 of my basses in under an hour.


Of the basses you mentioned, I'd go with either the VM J or SUB. Keep looking for something used. You get much much more for your money.

Practice your setups.
"Quick to judge. Quick to anger. Slow to understand. Ignorance and prejudice and fear walk hand-in-hand."
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#10
Thanks for your advice, deeptubes. I'll give it a go at setting up myself, then. If I fail I can always ask the music shop to do it anyway. You never know, it might be set up well when I buy it!

@everyone else - thanks for your opinions on the different basses. I originally loved the sound of the Stingray, but now it's kinda lost its effect on me. Same with the sound of the Jazz bass. I love the versatility of the Ibanez, but...I dunno. It doesn't feel like the others.

The only two of these I've actually played are the Squire PJ bass and the Schechter Omen 5. I like the feel of them, but I better try out the others at my local music store before I choose!

Woody
#11
Quote by deeptubes
Practice doing setups on your current bass. Do them until you get the playability where you want it. While you're doing them, take notes - find the measurements that feel good to you. I've seen some setup directions out of order. The proper procedure is: tune, adjust truss rod, re-tune, double check truss (a.k.a. neck relief), re-tune if you made another adjustment to the truss, adjust bridge saddles height (action), re-tune, adjust intonation - sharp, move saddles toward bridge; flat, move saddles toward neck - re-tune, adjust pickups, done. Some people use the comparison between 12th harmonics and open notes to check intonation. I've always used the fretted note and open notes. Harmonics are affected by intonation.

I've saved a ton of money over the years and learned exactly how I like my basses setup by doing them myself. My friends were thrilled, too. First one took an hour and a half. Now, I can do all 7 of my basses in under an hour.


Of the basses you mentioned, I'd go with either the VM J or SUB. Keep looking for something used. You get much much more for your money.

Practice your setups.


Agree with @deeptubes here. I also do my own setups. If you are willing to try this yourself, I would suggest you purchase:

A Capo - this helps to clamp strings down at the different frets needed to check action and pickup height

A set of feeler gauges - this helps to determine the proper action action and pickup height. A ruler with 64th of an inch scale will work, but the feeler gauges are more accurate
#12
One additional thing that will help with setups: A neck radius gauge.

You can get free printable ones here: http://www.pickguardian.com/free-tools/need-a-set-of-neck-radius-gauges/. Print them on heavy paper and cut them out carefully with scissors. These gauges will help to make sure that when you adjust the string saddles on the bridge, they follow the curve of the fingerboard.