#1
When playing a long to a song, how do you tell what pick up selection their using. I dont have a ear to pick up stuff like that
#2
Well you don't know what pick-up they'll be using because all pick-ups are different and it comes down to the artists personal preference. Some artists even have guitars with only a single pick-up because it's their preference. Unless you really know the artist and are quite the wiz with pick-ups then it's pretty impossible to tell. The general sort of loose guideline is that the neck pickup is better for leads and the bridge better for rhythm. This is by no means set in stone at all though because as I said - every pick-up is different.
Get to know your guitar and what kind of sound you can achieve with different pick-ups. I've played all my guitars at home long enough to have developed a preference and to get a general idea of what pick-up and guitar I'll need when covering other artists music.

EDIT: Out of curiosity, what guitar are you using and what artist / song are you trying to sound like?
Last edited by vayne92 at Oct 22, 2015,
#3
^ yeah

that being said there are probably some rough rules of thumb:

rhythm distortion- bridge pickup
screaming lead- bridge pickup
smoother lead- neck pickup
jazzier/warmer cleans- neck pickup
brighter cleans- bridge pickup
more interesting cleans or light crunch tones- one of the settings which has more than one pickup on at once

probably keep your guitar's tone knob up full as well, and the volume knob.
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#4
Quote by Dave_Mc
^ yeah

that being said there are probably some rough rules of thumb:

rhythm distortion- bridge pickup
screaming lead- bridge pickup
smoother lead- neck pickup
jazzier/warmer cleans- neck pickup
brighter cleans- bridge pickup
more interesting cleans or light crunch tones- one of the settings which has more than one pickup on at once

probably keep your guitar's tone knob up full as well, and the volume knob.


I agree with he said above, but try not to use the volume knob at full sound, except when soloing with full gain. The volume knob is very useful for those warm sounds when you roll it down a bit, and even for a fair amount of distortion, but just enough so that the band as a whole doesn´t sound like a bloody mess, and it is pleasant for the listener . My advise is that you learn to use the eletronics of your guitar, so that you don´t rely too much on turning distortion on and off, or using several different distortions, you can have almost all of them with only a turn of the volume and/or the tone knob. Despite having my pedals, I can still go through one night of gigging with the amp distortion on, and go through clean, warmer and distorted sounds only with the knobs in the guitar.
Last edited by Mr RafaelD at Oct 22, 2015,
#5
^ it definitely doesn't hurt to learn how to use your guitar controls, but it depends on the type of tones you want and personal preference, too. you may well prefer the tone with the volume full up. and if you have a treble bleed circuit on your volume knob you won't get that softening effect when you turn the volume down. if you prefer the tone with the volume knob full up you could e.g. kick on a boost pedal for solos.
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#6
Quote by Dave_Mc
^ it definitely doesn't hurt to learn how to use your guitar controls, but it depends on the type of tones you want and personal preference, too. you may well prefer the tone with the volume full up. and if you have a treble bleed circuit on your volume knob you won't get that softening effect when you turn the volume down. if you prefer the tone with the volume knob full up you could e.g. kick on a boost pedal for solos.


I like to keep my volume knob maxed and use a pedal for a solo boost, and I'm been doing that for a long time, and it works 100% fine, but the last 6 months or so I've really been playing with my volume to get different tones, but still using max volume with pedal as my lead boost.
#7
If you really want to get as close as possible to the original then I'd suggest looking on Youtube for clips and you might be able to see where their pickup switch is. Having said that, remember (like others have said) that each guitar/pickup/amp is different. The neck pickup on a Strat will round very different to the neck pickup on a Les Paul, etc.

Me personally I play mostly with the bridge pickup and only switch to the neck when I play past the 12th fret (usually whilst soloing). I find the neck pickup gives a bassier tone and it gives more body to notes played higher up the register.
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#8
Quote by ibanezn00b5
When playing a long to a song, how do you tell what pick up selection their using. I dont have a ear to pick up stuff like that

Truth is, if your ears can't pick up the difference yet there's no point worrying about it, that'll come in time,

Different pickups give different sounds, you choose the pickup based on the sound you want. If you're playing a particular song then it doesn't actually matter which pickup is selected, what matters is whether or not you're happy with the sound you're getting.

If you're happy then carry on what you're doing because if YOU'RE happy nothing needs changing. If you're not happy then try a different switch position and see if you like that better. Experiment to your hearts content and you'll pick up things as you progress and learn more, if you'll pardon the pun.
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