#1
I'm in no rush (I say this but I just understand patience haha) to get better but I really want to speed up my playing.

So far the only thing I've found I can practice is songs to speed up, such as To End The Rapture by A7X, ultimately what I want to be able to play but I cannot get the speed, practice is needed but I need to bring my skill and speed up anyway to be able to practice it better now.

Is there any excercises I can practice that would help with this? I start slow with everything anyway and always try and build the speed up but I've hit a wall with my speed/Cleanliness and it's really frustrating me.

Thanks guys
#2
Really, it is all about putting in the practice time. You can't speed up speeding up.
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#3
yep practice is the only way
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#4
You need to practice with a metronome or something like Guitar Pro where you can adjust the BPM while you play along with it.

Start at a slow pace where you can flawlessly play the part(s) every time. Then bump up the BPM by 2 and continue to play the part flawlessly. Continue to raise the BPM by 2 until you reach the desired speed.

You may notice some technique issues slowing you down along the way like moving your fingers too much, bad thumb placement, bad muting, wasting energy in fingers that are not fretting notes, etc. Correct all of these as you increase the BPM.

So if you want to play a song that's 170 BPM, try starting around 120 BPM and see if you can do it. If not, start slower and only increase by 2 BPM at a time. Such a small increase in tempo is trivial to your brain and muscle memory so as you play flawlessly at each 2 BPM increase you'll be great at full speed.
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#5
It's like Yngwie said, by eating bananas.Or do what i did and just listen to a lot of really fast shit and get it into your head that that's what you need to play.Surround yourself with that and it becomes easy.
#6
I know this will sound dumb but how do you play along to a metronome? Do I play each note to the click of the metronome? Or do I play a few notes per click?

I think my fingers may be doing more than they need to? Would I be able to upload a video and get some good criticism on what I'm doing wrong and what I can do different?
#7
Quote by Pijay7T13
I know this will sound dumb but how do you play along to a metronome? Do I play each note to the click of the metronome? Or do I play a few notes per click?

I think my fingers may be doing more than they need to? Would I be able to upload a video and get some good criticism on what I'm doing wrong and what I can do different?

Assuming your song is in 3/4 or 4/4, set the metronome to click once every beat. Then play your notes according to the beat. For example, sixteenth notes would mean you play 4 notes per beat. If you play each note to each click (I've tried that before. Can't remember why), you'll find your metronome (or your app) will max out too fast to use it to practice anything remotely fast, because you're essentially doubling or quadrupling the BPM.

A video would be good.
#8
A metronome is essentially a drummer. A drummer with absolute perfect timing. So when you're playing guitar along to a metronome think of it as the drum track.
To End the Rapture is a very simple song when it comes to the drums, so figuring out how to configure your metronome is simple enough. it's in 4/4 timing played at a tempo of roughly 110bpm, so that's going to be the tempo your metronome should be at when practicing full speed. So once you've roughly learned how to play the song, try starting at half the tempo, so try around 50-60bpm. It should give you an idea if it's too fast or too slow, then you can adjust the tempo accordingly.

If you listen to To end the Rapture you'll notice the hi-hats are primarily used to keep this 110bpm timing.
Listen to Unholy Confessions, and you'll notice at the start that the drummer keeps time with the snare / kick drum. If you were to try and figure out the tempo for that song by yourself, then you would try and get each beat of the metronome in time with the snare / kick drum.

I hope that makes a bit more sense to you. It can seem kind of confusing at first, but it's really not. I would link you to a particular video that explains time signatures and bpm, but unfortunately I don't know of any really good ones. Maybe someone here will be able to link a good one.


At the end of the day, however, To End the Rapture is quite an advanced song. If you're still a beginner don't hope to be playing the song up to speed any time in the near future. It's going to take a long long time. If you haven't learned to crawl, don't expect to be running any time soon.
Last edited by vayne92 at Oct 23, 2015,
#9
No offense but if you don't know how to play along with a metronome I think theirs more important things to learn than just speed. I think Mastering the basic is the key. Most people think they can play but when it comes down to it they can't.

Also for speed you really need to put in some time not just 1 hour a day and be patience.
If you really want speed it will come in the end.
Also I don't believe playing slowly with a metronome for 8 hours a day isn't going to increase your speed much. First you need the right hand position, light touch etc..
Then vary thought out the day example play 30 mins slow then another fast then in the middle. Also I also play unplug. Yes you need to learn to mute but that's 10 times easier than playing clean.
Also most people's hands are weak. Try doing a trill with your 3rd and 4 finger....
practice trills. Stronger hands = Faster hands

Hope it helps!
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Last edited by Guitar137335 at Oct 23, 2015,
#10
Quote by Guitar137335
No offense but if you don't know how to play along with a metronome I think theirs more important things to learn than just speed. I think Mastering the basic is the key.


A metronome is not used exclusively for guitarists to increase their speed. It is a device primarily designed to keep time, and it's used by all musicians, not just guitarists. Knowing the basics and having a strong set of fundamentals is very important just as you said. There's nothing more basic and more important than keeping time. Every album you've ever heard in your life was recorded to a click track (metronome). Even the best drummers in the world use a click track (metronome) when recording and even playing live. There are of course some exceptions, but you shouldn't overlook the importance of what a metronome helps a musician achieve.
Last edited by vayne92 at Oct 23, 2015,
#11
Yeah, i'd rather play to a drum machine than a metronome.I think different drum patterns bring out different stuff too.
#12
There is a program called Amazing Slow Downer. You get it on your PC, I got it as an app on my iPhone. It's less than $20. It allows you to loop parts, and slow down the tempo as much as you need to. It works much better than the other guitar trainers as far as morphing out the guitar sound when slowing it way down. This is the way to go. Once you know something, try playing along to it at 70%(for example) until you can do it easily, then speed it up gradually.
#13
For me, I slow the piece down and make sure I really know my stuff. Then the speed comes pretty easy
#15
Quote by King Shredder
Yeah, i'd rather play to a drum machine than a metronome.I think different drum patterns bring out different stuff too.


Well you use them for different things. A metronome is for working on rhythm because it provides only the pulse, and you have to make the rhythm. A drum track is for practicing specific pieces of music or jamming.
#16
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Last edited by steven seagull at Oct 24, 2015,
#17
A good thing to do when you first start practicing with a metronome is to count 1,2,3,4 aloud, without a guitar in your hands. Start at 60 BPM, and try to zero in on the beat. Tapping your foot is helpful. Then double it by counting 1 and 2 and etc. with the "ands" landing between the beats. When you start with the guitar, pick one note per click, alternate down and up picking one note, D string 7th fret(doesn't really matter). Then double that so that you are down picking on the clicks, up picking in between.

You may find this to be pretty easy, if not practice a bit everyday until it is.
#18
Quote by vayne92
A metronome is essentially a drummer. A drummer with absolute perfect timing. So when you're playing guitar along to a metronome think of it as the drum track.
To End the Rapture is a very simple song when it comes to the drums, so figuring out how to configure your metronome is simple enough. it's in 4/4 timing played at a tempo of roughly 110bpm, so that's going to be the tempo your metronome should be at when practicing full speed. So once you've roughly learned how to play the song, try starting at half the tempo, so try around 50-60bpm. It should give you an idea if it's too fast or too slow, then you can adjust the tempo accordingly.

If you listen to To end the Rapture you'll notice the hi-hats are primarily used to keep this 110bpm timing.
Listen to Unholy Confessions, and you'll notice at the start that the drummer keeps time with the snare / kick drum. If you were to try and figure out the tempo for that song by yourself, then you would try and get each beat of the metronome in time with the snare / kick drum.


Brilliant way of explaining it! Made a lot of sense, is this the same with all songs? Time the metronome to the snare/kick?

I'll upload a video of me playing it tomorrow, then you can tell me if i'm doing anything wrong with my hands and such. Thanks though guys. I'm in no rush to play fast, I know it isn't an overnight thing, but it's just where I want to be so wanted some advice on getting there. Thanks a lot though guys
#19
Quote by rickyvanh
There is a program called Amazing Slow Downer. You get it on your PC, I got it as an app on my iPhone. It's less than $20. It allows you to loop parts, and slow down the tempo as much as you need to. It works much better than the other guitar trainers as far as morphing out the guitar sound when slowing it way down. This is the way to go. Once you know something, try playing along to it at 70%(for example) until you can do it easily, then speed it up gradually.


Also just looked up this app! Looks brilliant and think it would REALLY help on getting my timing right! Just some advice on hand posture and picking! If I want to play fast should I bring my thumb lower and straighten out my fingers? I also really struggle to keep my ring finger close to the fretboard, it seems to only be this one that wants to pull away.
#20
Quote by Pijay7T13
Brilliant way of explaining it! Made a lot of sense, is this the same with all songs? Time the metronome to the snare/kick?


It's definitely not the same with all songs, but generally you'll be listening to the hi-hats/snare/kick to keep time. With your more standard metal songs it's very common, but If you get in to more progressive music it can be a lot trickier to keep time. Dream Theater being an excellent example...



If you were to skip to 0:30 and try and figure out how the drummer keeps in time there.. Well I truly do not know. It can be as simple as a basic snare drum beat like you hear in Unholy Confessions, or it can be much more unclear as with the song above
#21
Quote by Pijay7T13
Also just looked up this app! Looks brilliant and think it would REALLY help on getting my timing right! Just some advice on hand posture and picking! If I want to play fast should I bring my thumb lower and straighten out my fingers? I also really struggle to keep my ring finger close to the fretboard, it seems to only be this one that wants to pull away.

Your fingers will cooperate more and more, just keep at it. It takes time, it is developing naturally whether you are aware of it or not. It's like a baby learning to talk. A lot of things have to come together at the same time. Patience, persistence, and lots of practice is the way. If you want to be able to run fast, you have to be able to walk without thinking about it.
#22
All these guys with silly answers. The easiest would to speed up your playing is to record it, loud it to Audacity, and use the "Change Speed" or "Change Tempo" effect depending on whether or not you want to change the pitch as well.
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