#1
Anyone ever look into Berklee Online for guitar courses?

Price is a bit much but I didn't get into music until later in life and now that i have a passion for it i want to go to school for it.

This is strictly personal growth, I'll never be a gigging musician or earn a full living through music. (I've been a computer engineer the last 12 years)

With a family, 2x kids and kid activities, I haven't found the right practice routine to see the growth i want.

Looking for something structured -

Any feedback is appreciated,

Boyd
#2
I think if you're going to pay, it should be for in-person instruction. I also think it comes down to how much time you're actually able/willing to put into music.

If you're not pursuing music as a profession, I don't think you need to "go to school", and you may actually find that much structure and scrutiny too stressful. Most students who get a BA in music performance spend upwards of 12 hours a day doing something music related during college, and typically have 10+ years of training prior to that. There is no "night school" option for that level of professional training.

Getting a basic practical education on guitar and other musical areas, however, is something you can do on a more casual basis. I don't think you need t rely on an established curriculum to get what you want as an amateur musician. Many state universities offer Continuing Studies programs just for people who want education for enrichment. For music, those are basically private lessons from grad students. You can also find highly qualified (if expensive) private teachers with education credentials who know how to structure your education.
#3
Quote by boyd98
Anyone ever look into Berklee Online for guitar courses?

Price is a bit much but I didn't get into music until later in life and now that i have a passion for it i want to go to school for it.

This is strictly personal growth, I'll never be a gigging musician or earn a full living through music. (I've been a computer engineer the last 12 years)

With a family, 2x kids and kid activities, I haven't found the right practice routine to see the growth i want.

Looking for something structured -

Any feedback is appreciated,

Boyd


I can't recommend a music degree for personal growth. Most of the program revolves around professional career prep. Find the most highly regarded guitar teacher in your area, take private lessons, and tailor sessions to your needs. If you own every lesson and come back the following week ripping through the exercises you will advance very quickly without all the unrelated general Ed courses.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#4
Making music is an art. Training yourself to do art is a science.

You're an engineer, you should be able to do some research and ask around here and optimize a real routine that when stuck to, will yield some serious growth.

To answer your question though, music school isn't really guitar centric, so that's something to keep in mind. If you just want to shred don't do it. Be prepared to get into classical and jazz.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#6
I'd say no. Let's break it down.

Scales and Chords 101?

You can learn that anywhere, Berklee doesn't have secret chords or scales.

Classic Rock Guitar/Steve Vai Guitar Techs?

Learn and analyze bunch of Vai tunes and his approach will be obvious. Same goes for every classic rock player.

Improvisation Techniques?

Same deal. Although this is probably the hardest one to self teach, it can be done. Improv training definitely works better with some guidance, however.

If you don't mind us asking, what's your skill level like now?
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#7
Been noodling for about 8 years (hate saying that out loud); but and 8 year old and an 11 year old kid, plus normal full time job, and a wife that needs attention is all part of the equation.

connecting minor pentatonic, blues scales in the 5 positions is about as much scale work as I have in my hands
Full songs i've learned are mostly ac/dc, some skynyrd, some faster metallica rhythm
acoustic strummers / fingerpicking

It's all about time and practice (i get that).

The school thing is really just the structure and having realistic goals to meet that's appealing -
#8
I don't know about online courses... If you want some structure, I would just take some lessons. A real life teacher is better than an online course because an actual teacher can correct your mistakes right away. And the same stuff doesn't work for everybody. An actual teacher can use different methods for different people.

And you don't necessarily need to take many lessons. Take a couple of them and then decide if you want to continue taking them.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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Yamaha P115
#9
You could probably get lessons in multiple music topics for a couple hundred bucks a month. Not cheap, but certainly not as expensive as tuition, and much more flexible than a pre-determined curriculum. Guitar alone from an awesome teacher is probably $40-50 per week by itself. If you do a guitar lesson every other week and also take lessons in something like composition or theory/ear skills, you can get about as much information as you'll ever need to play and understand your instrument decently.


The learning curve gets a lot steeper as you get into higher level skills - you can attain general competency without a ton of training. Much of the time that serious music students put in is dedicated to very technical, nuanced stuff in preparation for performance. Sight reading, analyzing Stravinsky scores, transcribing orchestral music... probably not stuff you need to focus on as a casual guitarist.
#10
The benefit of a private guitar teacher is that they know your goals and can see exactly where your skills are now. The good ones can set you on the shortest path from A-B.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#11
You know, I'm skeptical of online education, particularly for something like music.

Part of the learning experience of any sort of arts program is being in the community of other artists - forming impromptu jam groups, exploring with people, etc. I think not getting that would be missing out on a lot of the value of a program like that.
#12
I actually burn a lot of money.

My kids take private lessons; great guitar teacher for 75$ a week, comes to the house for 2hrs.

I use to break that into 3rds and take my lesson, but now only consult him about X when needed. I let each kid grab an hour each. They do well with this -

I ASSUMED a curriculum may be more thought through with a long term end goal vs cherry picking topics. I might be overthinking this and putting too much faith in a "program"


Thanks again
#13
No matter what educational path you take, you're choosing what end goals to pursue and what smaller topics to investigate. I think most guitar lessons for kids who aren't music school bound are more like what you describe: meandering through topics at whatever pace the student is most comfortable with. But if you want an academic style of teaching challenges you to accomplish a long term goal, you can most definitely find teachers who are trained to do just that.
#14
Quote by boyd98
Anyone ever look into Berklee Online for guitar courses?

Price is a bit much but I didn't get into music until later in life and now that i have a passion for it i want to go to school for it.

This is strictly personal growth, I'll never be a gigging musician or earn a full living through music. (I've been a computer engineer the last 12 years)

With a family, 2x kids and kid activities, I haven't found the right practice routine to see the growth i want.

Looking for something structured -

Any feedback is appreciated,

Boyd


My good buddy JetPenguin is a Berklee Graduate, and he can advise you on the pro's and cons.

I'd defer to him, as to whether it's worth it or not. In my opinion, it's way over priced, and much of that is around the name. You could buy Berklee's books on Harmony, and the Modern Method for Guitar, if you wanted, and you'd have a lot of what they do, for a lot less

If I may, I run an Online Guitar school, that may have the kind of structure you're looking for. You definitely appear to fit into our present student demographic, but I'd want to talk with you more to see where your present level is.

You're welcome to have a look at our online Course Catalog and let me know if you have any questions.

Best,

Sean
#15
Quote by HotspurJr
You know, I'm skeptical of online education, particularly for something like music.

Part of the learning experience of any sort of arts program is being in the community of other artists - forming impromptu jam groups, exploring with people, etc. I think not getting that would be missing out on a lot of the value of a program like that.


True, but one doesn't mean the other can't happen also.

Certainly, being shown correct technique (or rather body/hand position to go with the technique) can only happen in a two-way dialogue, but a great deal i general can be learned without being face-to-face.