#1
Good day everyone,

I am going to the store tonight and this is why I am asking all this before

I just received a Ditto Looper (ver1) as a gift and never used that.
I was wondering how I should plug it. I'd rather plug it to the computer since I

already have the Scarlett2i2 and some software. I am just wondering if the sound will

be alright with some 200$ logitech speakers.

I am just a beginner and likes to try some stuff.

I was wondering, if I want to make some effects with the guitar, should I be using the

software on the computer or I should be using some pedals?

I was looking at the TC Electronic Hall of Fame and the TC Electronic Flashback.
Or, does the Boss ME25 would replace those 3 pedals? Ditto, HoF and FB?

It's cheaper.. is it the same quality?

Second question is! Let's say I want to play by myself for fun and add some percussion

or a beat, I would I proceed?
Should I use my mic and record a little loop of a beat on the body on my guitar? but

then after, when I use my guitar to loop more rythmn, Ill will also record the beat

playing on the background through the speakers?

What software should I be using? I know this all comes to preferences but I'd like

some input

Thank you very much for all the help!!


Here is what I currently have:

Software Logic Pro X, Garage Band or Reaper
AMP Scarlett 2i2
Headphones Audio Technica ATH-M50
Mic Audio Technica AT2020
Mic 2 x GLS Audio ES-57
Kit Fender amp 5w maybe?
Electric guitar Fender Strat (Cheap Kit strat)
Acoustic guitar Norman B18
Classical guitar La Patrie Concert with EQ
Pedal: Ditto Looper
#2
You could use some monitors but probably not too much since you have headphones. I suggest to just hunker down and get good with what you have right now.

TC's stuff is great and if you want to get them, that's fine but if you're unsure which way to go maybe a ME25 or ME50, or one of the other equivalents like the Vox, POD, Zoom units might be a better idea in the short run as you can experiment and find out what effects are essential to your style.
#3
If you are after reverb and delay, I would strongly suggest using computer software.

To add percussion I would suggest using software since you are going to use the computer during your practise sessions.

Get an amp sim and pedal sims that you can get cheaply and try them out before investing in expensive gear such as pedals and tube amps.

In the first 5 years of playing guitar I bought about 12 pedals. I don't like a single one of them today.
#6
Quote by Gab_Azz


In the first 5 years of playing guitar I bought about 12 pedals. I don't like a single one of them today.



Pedals, for me, have been in and out of the rig on a regular basis. I've kept all the pedals I've bailed on, rather than selling them off or trading them in, and they now serve to remind me that giving in to a temporary GAS for some new thing will eventually just mean that I'm going to toss it, too, in a bin. Helps me curb tossing good money after bad.
#7
Quote by dspellman
Pedals, for me, have been in and out of the rig on a regular basis. I've kept all the pedals I've bailed on, rather than selling them off or trading them in, and they now serve to remind me that giving in to a temporary GAS for some new thing will eventually just mean that I'm going to toss it, too, in a bin. Helps me curb tossing good money after bad.


Exactly! I've accumulated around 30 pedals over the years while I use about 5 at a time. and sometimes a use another 5 one at a time.
#8
I think it's just a matter of doing the right research, though, and asking yourself a bunch of times if you really need it before buying. :P I've only sold one pedal of the ones I got, the very first one, and not because I didn't like it but basically I got a better amp and decided I can get a distortion tone that fits me better with it. All the others have stayed and are not going anywhere, I searched the internets quite a bit every time if I can find anything cooler in the same price range and the answer was no, so here they are.

Although also, I always got pedals when looking for something specific (a delay first, then a reverb, then a noise gate, etc.), never got anything just because it looked cool. Either way, with this kind of approach I think you have a good chance of getting stuff you'll really like and use regularly, and pedals have the advantage of working with pretty much any amp, so you can keep them forever as long as they work.
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
There's no point in trying to convince a moron.
#9
Logic and Garage Band have a lot of useful effect plugins and a ton of virtual drums including smart drums that will trigger based on the guitar rhythms you put down. Dig in and learn to use the tools already in your shed.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY