#1
So I wired up a Jackson for a friend and he wanted a JB/Jazz set and for some reason this makes sense but reassurance is good for those who have more experience with out of phase wiring than I do as it's usually a mod I avoid.

My "theory" is that reversing the phase of the neck in this pickup set will result in a less intense out of phase sound as the Jazz in this set is way less output which is one reason this pickup set is so desirable.

does this make sense or does it not matter you'll get the same results. Every other time I usually just phase reverse the bridge.
#2
I don't think it matters, the output senses the whole circuit, not the individual pickups.

Watch out for noise problems, because the earth becomes the hot on one of the pickups in the oop position. That may affect which one you choose to switch. I've done phase switching on a magnetic/piezo combination. I use a three-wire system - ground and the two coil wires - on the magnetic, which has the phase switch installed.
#3
Quote by Tony Done
Watch out for noise problems, because the earth becomes the hot on one of the pickups in the oop position. That may affect which one you choose to switch. I've done phase switching on a magnetic/piezo combination. I use a three-wire system - ground and the two coil wires - on the magnetic, which has the phase switch installed.

Aren't SDs generally 4-conductor + separate ground? So it shouldn't be an issue. And given how much SD seem to encourage different wiring schemes, I really doubt it would be.

And no, which pickup you reverse the conductors on won't affect the sound. You can look at it as waves or vectors, but basically you've got two alternating currents (i.e. the current oscillates around zero) that can interfere either constructively or destructively. Whichever pickup you reverse the polarity on, the only difference is which side of zero the resultant current is at any given time, which has no effect on the sound. Amplitude will remain the same, likewise obviously frequency and, well, everything else.
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Last edited by K33nbl4d3 at Oct 29, 2015,
#5
the shielding is good in this guitar. It has some of those crimped wires you screw into the body and graphite resin paint. I'm a fan of copper tape more but this works out. as hum cancellation is pretty good on this guitar. Followed a Seymour Duncan diagram and it worked out fine.

The pickups are humbuckers with 4 wire conductors so you're right.

Thanks for the insight so far guys, any other bits of feedback or experience I'm all for it.
Last edited by Tallwood13 at Oct 29, 2015,
#6
Yeah, it shouldn't make a difference which one here. Some people really dig that out of phase sound, and some don't. How does it sound?
Dave @ Seymour Duncan
#7
It was such an unorthadox wiring what it ended up in the end the phase reversal that I took it out and I'm trying out this mod called the "megabucker" , the JB is powerful enough but I'm doing this out of curiosity.
#8
Quote by Tony Done
I don't think it matters, the output senses the whole circuit, not the individual pickups.


The best way I've seen this controlled is to have a blend knob which will vary the "amount" of each pickup that comes through. All the way back and the bridge pickup sounds like...the bridge pickup. All the way forward and the neck pickup sounds like the neck pickup. Anywhere off those two ends adds in some of the other pickup, but out of phase, and you get a pretty good variety of tones.

One other set of tones available is to have both pickups in parallel mode when you reverse the phase. And in one case I've seen that particular setup wired with a capacitor (I'll have to back and look) that reduces some of the bass response of the neck pickup.

And finally, the out of phase business can get VERY midrangey and very nasally -- having a mids rolloff on the guitar can make those middle tones a lot more usable.