#1
Hi all,

I'm shopping for Hot Rod Deluxe 212 - absolutely certain on this amp - and I'm on quite the budget. Accordingly, I'm looking into used amps. I was planning on simply saving up for a little bit, but I've come across a deal on the 2009 model that seems like a good opportunity.

Now, it's my understanding that the Hot Rods do have somewhat of a reputation for a couple of issues and it seems like this falls into the "common issue" category: This amp works perfectly fine aside from intermittent, unprovoked channel switching.

After a little bit of research I'm thinking this is one of those issues stemming from the R78/R79 resistors, a point of failure generally considered to be easily remediable.

Here are my questions -
DOES this sound like I'm accurately diagnosing the issue?
HOW much - ballpark, of course - should i expect the repair to run me?
IS it, in your opinion, worth a $150 dollar risk?

He's looking for $150 which seems like a great price if the issue is what i believe it to be. I just want to be sure - or relatively sure - that i'm not gonna end up paying more in the long run than i would for a fully functional used HRD 212, which seems to be about 450.

Thank in advance for your insights!
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Last edited by mxlct at Nov 2, 2015,
#2
with out seeing it
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
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Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#3
find out what that would cost to get fixed and use that to help you determine if it's worth it to you. for $150 it seems like a good deal.
#4
In general I suggest against buying 'fixer-upper' amps if you're not going to be the one doing repairs. It's generally just too expensive and risky to pay someone else to do the work for you. Buying amps for repair is gambling, and while it may seem like a sure bet or free money, you have to remember that that's exactly why gambling makes money for the house and not the average gambler.

I'd actually be optimistic about the channel switching issue, and if it were me I'd chance it, knowing I could swap some components or just rip out the channel switching entirely if it came to that. The problem is that you're paying for someone else's bench time, and you could end up paying a bunch of money to find out that that your $150 amp is a doorstop. I don't feel comfortable telling someone else to make that bet. $150 isn't too much to lose, but it might cost you $100 just to be told you bought a brick, and that's throwing bad money after bad. If you've got money to burn it's no issue, but I don't think it's smart to gamble a third of your budget for a decent amp.

If you want an amp that works, you should buy an amp that works. There's a whole profession dedicated to taking your money when you can't figure out why your amp is broken, and they generally don't give sympathy discounts. You might get lucky with a broken amp, but I wouldn't count on getting lucky with a broken amp at someone else's hourly rate.
#5
Must be a Hot Rod DeVille...

It will cost at least $100 to have a pro repair tech handle repairs on it. Probably a simple fix but everyone has a minimum bench fee so they can pay rent and feed their kids. So now you are $250 into a "maybe ok" amp. I personally would rather have "sure thing" Blues Jr. than a "maybe ok" HRD 212. Me thinks someone spilled beer into the topside channel switch. If you can fix this yourself, go for it.

YMMV
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Nov 2, 2015,
#6
I also worry, every time I see one of these ads, that "sold as is - probably easily fixed but I don't want the trouble" actually means "I took it to my tech and he said I needed a new OT and a solid alibi."
#7
Quote by Roc8995
I also worry, every time I see one of these ads, that "sold as is - probably easily fixed but I don't want the trouble" actually means "I took it to my tech and he said I needed a new OT and a solid alibi."


Yep, so $800 later you have a nice $500 amp.

I have bought a lot of used amps on the cheap but every one I could diagnose with a test drive and repair myself. I don't buy stuff that won't meet this standard.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Nov 2, 2015,
#8
I'm going with Roc on this one.
If you are going to be taking it to a tech to repair, I would avoid it.
If you are going to be doing the work yourself, and have experience successfully repairing electronics, go for it.


If it were me, I would probably go for it.
But I have spent much of my working life repairing broken things like cars, motorcycles, chainsaws, lawmowers, computers, software, spent years working in IT fixing computers and network systems as well as setting them up, and yes, even amps and guitar pedals.

It sounds like you have done some research on the issue at hand already.
I would suggest doing a little more research and seeing if there are other common causes or even "un-common" causes of this problem before you spend any money on this amp.

"intermittent, unprovoked channel switching" sounds like faulty relays, or more precisely, whatever triggers the relays is faulty.
I'm not familiar with the innards or the specific circuitry of the amp to properly diagnose it, but that could be caused by a number of things, most common would be an intermittent short somewhere, though not the only possibility.

You could take it to an amp tech and tell him "After a little bit of research I'm thinking this is one of those issues stemming from the R78/R79 resistors, a point of failure generally considered to be easily remediable.", but it doesn't mean he/she is going to listen to you, or give any credence to what you say.
I myself know of only two techs in my area that would give genuine consideration to what I have told them, one of whom has referred to me as "The Tom Scholz of Reno" on more than one occasion for my abilities/knowledge (I also bought my Strat from him), and the other I have done repair work for, and both of them own/run small guitar/music stores.


Also, keep in mind, the Hot Rod series have a generally crappy overdrive channel.
And that's not just my opinion.


Quote by Cajundaddy
Must be a Hot Rod DeVille...

It will cost at least $100 to have a pro repair tech handle repairs on it. Probably a simple fix but everyone has a minimum bench fee so they can pay rent and feed their kids. So now you are $250 into a "maybe ok" amp. I personally would rather have "sure thing" Blues Jr. than a "maybe ok" HRD 212. Me thinks someone spilled beer into the topside channel switch. If you can fix this yourself, go for it.

YMMV


My minimum "bench fee" is $50 (Although I have been known to barter if they have something I want) and I have never seen one lower than that.
But a $50 bench fee, IME, is, or has been, a fairly common price.
And that just to look at it, it doesn't include actually doing any repairs.

Absolute best case scenario is, its going to cost you $100 to repair this amp
Last edited by CodeMonk at Nov 2, 2015,