#1
Can you please help me improve my vibrato and tell me how I should improve it?

It sounds like this: https://soundcloud.com/lol-ok-1/untitled-8

Also, the guitar I'm using is a Fender Strat (A beginner version of it) And a Frontman 10G amp.

Can you rate my vibrato 1 though 10 and how I should improve it?

Thank you.
#2
Bend was sharp as fuck to my ear. I'd like to hear this amplified as the vibrato itself was quickly muffled.
#3
First of all, it'd be easier to judge your vibrato if you played a lower note without bending it first. Using vibrato with a bend is an important skill of course, but just for clarity you could try a simple, flat note, and hold the vibrato for longer. It'd make it easier for us.

From what I can tell from the clip, yeah you probably should improve your vibrato. I have no idea how I'd rate it, number ratings are kind of silly.

You need to understand that vibrato is not just vibrating a note. Things like speed, wideness and timing are huge factors in good vibrato technique. Some notes benefit from a slow, deep vibrato. Some need a fast, shallow one. Sometimes you need to do the "bowed instrument" trick, and start the vibrato a bit late, practically only applying it towards the end of the note.

The best way to approach practically anything with guitar is to hear someone do it well, and mimicking it. Take a listen to this guitar solo:

Oh god damn you UG and your automated embeds. The solo here starts at about 4:00

https://youtu.be/9p9X_OHKtvg?t=241

Like, holy shit. Pay attention to the vibrato applied to the first notes. Sounds pretty perfect, right? So, can you pull that off? If you can't, listen carefully. How fast is it? How wide? When does it start? It's like a puzzle: you need to put the pieces together to make it sound that good.

Here's an another example, something a bit cheesier:

Starts at 0:20

https://youtu.be/0lR1tt24mo4?t=20

Here, Becker is doing the same thing you were, applying vibrato to a bent note. Does it sounds similar to yours? Which one sounds better? What makes the difference here? You need to know the answers to these questions to really improve.

In the end, it's all a matter of sound. Does it sound good? If you think these solos I posted sound awful, of course you shouldn't thrive to sound like them. So pick a guitarist you like, pay attention to his/her vibrato, see if you like it or not, and if you do, see if you can pull that off yourself. Experiment with different speeds etc. to find a style of vibrato that you like. Listen and learn.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
Last edited by Kevätuhri at Nov 2, 2015,
#4
agree with kev. you need to start with vibrato on un bent notes and learn some control. carzy wide vibrato has it's place but often far more subtle vibrato sounds better and adds an emotive quality. i use vibrato a fair amount in my own tunes (see link in profile). once you get the hang of it then you cn start to apply it to bends. if you have a clip on tuner then use that to help keep your bends in tune or to a specific point. this will help with control and then you can apply vibrato to them. be sure to change up on the speed and width to get various sounds.
#5
I preferred John Petrucci’s vibrato because it always kind sound really aggressive and actually I liked both of the songs. But didn't Jason use the whammy bar (Vibrato bar) for his vibrato?
#6
Quote by hulkisexy
I preferred John Petrucci’s vibrato because it always kind sound really aggressive and actually I liked both of the songs. But didn't Jason use the whammy bar (Vibrato bar) for his vibrato?


for some of it certainly. that was what it was invented to do. i assume you want to learn finger vibrato. you can make effective use of finger vibrato to make it sound like a whammy bar was used. jimi hendrix did this more than you might think. i shoot for this on occasion myself.
#7
Quote by hulkisexy
I preferred John Petrucci’s vibrato because it always kind sound really aggressive and actually I liked both of the songs. But didn't Jason use the whammy bar (Vibrato bar) for his vibrato?


Well, I actually don't know I personally always play that with finger vibrato.
Quote by Jet Penguin
Theory: Not rules, just tools.

Quote by Hail
*note that by fan i mean that guy who wants his friends to know he knows this totally obscure hip band that only he knows about with 236 views on youtube. lookin' at Kev here
#8
First thing to do is get the bend in pitch and then slowly and controlled repeatedly release and return to pitch.Eventually it will become second nature.
#9
Vibrato is what separates bad players from good players.

The most important advice I can give you is that you must think of it in terms of rhythm - learn to do a vibrato slowly and on beat - set a metronome to 90 bpm and then shake the note up and down with quarter notes, then triplets, then eight notes, etc. For very fast vibratos its a bit of a blurr, but you really need to master the slow ones and build your way up.
#10
in general, good shallow vibrato is the slow one, good wide vibrato is the fast and aggressive one, but of course these are only guidance,not rule.

I agree with the suggestion above that you should practice vibrato with metronome. Vibrato is bending that is done repeatedly. And just like bending, you gotta to do it in tune.
And the important part is, each part of the vibrato MUST RETURN to starting pitch, else you will sound out of tune.
Hope it helps.

Best regard
#13
I see nothing wrong with the technique in the example you provided for bent string vibrato, and it can be rated as a 10, depending on how it is used/placed in the music. I would recommend practicing your vibrato technique with varying levels of overdrive, clean signals, timing, and even on different guitars. It's infinitely easier to master vibrato on an unbent string vs bent string. Bent string vibrato is an entirely different animal to tame and takes lots of practice to master, so consequently more practice time is needed for it.

Sustain really helps vibrato and vice-versa. While executing vibrato, a subtle change in the finger pressure, frequency, and amplitude of the vibrato can help to enhance and excite certain harmonics. That's right - you can induce or excite certain harmonics with vibrato! It takes some practice to listen and focus/drive the technique during the execution, and becomes exponentially more evident in an over-driven signal. It can greatly differ from one string and position on the fingerboard to another(*I'm giving away my secrets *). It's best to practice this technique while plugged DI, so as not to confuse the harmonics with feedback induced harmonics. Once you've mastered this technique, you can do some wild and crazy stuff through an amp that is overdriven. One more thing about that - you might want to raise your action a little more for it, as opposed to the lowest action you can get without your strings buzzing. It makes tapping, legato, and vibrato harder to do, but increases the harmonic tonality and harmonic response of the instrument.

Finally, vibrato can help compensate for a string that is slightly flat out of tune. So although you might not find yourself applying vibrato to every note, vibrato can in essense elevate the overall perception of the string's intonation. Finger pressure on the string can have an effect on the intonation, as well. As greater finger pressure is required to properly apply vibrato, you are effectually impacting the intonation of that string with a sort of dual effect. It becomes increasingly important to keep in mind when you're playing on the B string.

I hope this helps.
#14
hey man, the way im hearing this its not plugged into an amp which kinda explains the reason the note died out but the vibrato sounded pretty clean and much smoother than mine so it sounds like your doing pretty good although you should post another sound clip if the amp wasnt plugged because that could make a huge difference. its gotta be a 9/10 without the amp
#15
I love a good vibrato, and it can be done many ways according to personal taste and expression.

I always use the wrist and rotate it to get the vibrato going. For practice, I was told to hold a ketchup bottle in my hand and rotate my wrist back and forth to get the feeling for the speed and resistance to motion offered by the strings (beer bottles might be too short or too low mass - or maybe for lighter strings ;-) ). It seemed to be good advice.

As a side note: My violin lessons taught me that the human brain will hear the highest pitch and register onto that, so violin vibrato was to be done only on the note and lower - never higher. On guitar, this would require bending up to the note from the lower fret and doing it there. Most people do not do that, making guitar vibrato sound sharp - although that is not always so bad as it adds an urgency to the feeling created in a guitar solo. I do it both ways depending on the feeling I want to create.