#1
D add 9 -- F Maj 7 -- G6 -- D add 9

D add 9  --  F Maj 7  --   G6    --  D add 9 

0 (E)    --  0 (E)    --  0 (E)  --  0 (E)    
3 (D)    --  1 (C)    --  3 (D)  --  3 (D)     
2 (A)    --  2 (A)    --  4 (B)  --  2 (A)     
4 (F#)   --  3 (F)    --  5 (G)  --  4 (F#)


Tab is for the top four strings
assume that the other strings (E and A) are muted. Sorry if the fomatting is a little off. Its meant to be played in 4/4.

This progression has all the notes of the A minor scale plus an extra F# in there.
it sounds like its rooted in D major though.
Improvising over it sounds good in F major

my question: what key is it really in, and what other chords could be substituted in this progression.
thank you@
Canada is about 10,000,000 Square Kilometers, Without A Single Guitar Center!
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Ibanezrocker13
Last edited by ibanezrocker13 at Nov 3, 2015,
#3
No its not a real song. I was just noodling and I was wondering how this progression could have such an ambiguous tonal center.
It definitely feels like D major though. Any other opinions. Sry about the formatting if I didn't already say that
Canada is about 10,000,000 Square Kilometers, Without A Single Guitar Center!
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Ibanezrocker13
#4
Looks like D Major and the fact that you reckoned it was in D major from listening to it really puts the nail in the coffin.

The F is a "borrowed chord." It's very common to use the bIII in a major key in certain styles, ie. blues. The IV-I cadence at the end is pretty strong too.

One way I sometimes like to look at it is through the circle of fifths:
F is a little "outside" in the key of D. C is one step closer, and G is closer still. Going from F to G is moving the progression more "inside" to strengthen the connection to D. It has a certain smoothness to it.

Hope that made some sense.
#5
Thanks for the detailed answer Declan!! And looks like you too were right Neo. Thanks y'all
Canada is about 10,000,000 Square Kilometers, Without A Single Guitar Center!
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Ibanezrocker13
#6
Yes D is definitely key centre, and that first change (Dadd9 - Fmaj7) has a nice sense of major to parallel minor. (You could use a D bass through the whole thing.)
The concept covering this is "mode mixture" - all those chords come from different D modes - although you only need two different ones to explain it: D major and D minor essentially. (You could get fancy and say D mixolydian and D dorian, to restrict the difference to just one note, F# or F. But the simplest interpretation is "D major with a borrowed chord".)

You say improvising in F major sounds good, which would mean D minor (aeolian) given the D key centre. The F major/D minor scale has a Bb in it, and none of your chords require that; but the G chord has a B natural (which doesn't conflict with the others).
That suggests the C major scale might sound better.
C major scale = D dorian if the key is D.
Of course you need to consider the F# on the D chord, but you could stick with dorian and treat the F as a blue note.
Last edited by jongtr at Nov 4, 2015,
#7
The key is all about the tonic. If D sounds like home to you, that's the key. As others have said, you are just using a borrowed chord. It's very common to mix parallel minor and major.

I-bIII-IV-I is a very common chord progression. Listen to "Let Me Entertain You" for example. The whole song is based on that progression.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#8
My OCD kicked in and I had to straighten the formatting Hope you don't mind.

I used the code tags ( code and /code ) in square brackets to put the tab section into a coding box. Inside this box the characters and spaces between characters in a font all take up the same amount of room. So by counting it out you can line things up exactly where you wan them. Then using the "preview" button you can check your lining up was correct, but usually you'll have one or two little fixes to make.

It's a little fiddly and not really necessary (as you can see you got the answers you were looking for and everyone understood you perfectly fine). But sometimes it's really handy. Maybe you knew how to do this already, maybe you didn't. If you didn't then click the edit button to see what I did. I you did then it's all good
Si
#9
Mr 20tigers you are an absolute legend thanks for that I really couldn't figure out how to tab on here. I will definately listen to Let you entertain you. And Jongtr I like your approach to theory and will definately try to put some of that advice into motion.
Canada is about 10,000,000 Square Kilometers, Without A Single Guitar Center!
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Ibanezrocker13
#10
Another I-bIII-IV-I song that comes to my mind is "Think" by Aretha Franklin - the part where she sings "freedom". They are also the chords of the chorus of High Voltage by AC/DC.

Oh, and remember that the "Let Me Entertain You" I'm talking about is by Robbie Williams, not by Queen.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115