#1
Assume you're working for someone else. You personally have a turn-over that covers your paycheck, any other expenses for you doing your job and a remainder that is net profit for your boss. Now let's also assume that you're getting paid a decent wage that covers all you basic expenses (housing/food/pension fund/health care/a little saving/basic luxuries etc).
What would you say is a fair ratio between the net profit your boss/company makes (so both your pay and all other expenses already detracted) and your income?
Would your idea of this vary under different circumstances? Should there be a limit to how much someone can make from the work of another?
Last edited by ultimate-slash at Nov 6, 2015,
#2
I'd be fucking the boss's wife, so she'd be buying me stuff with his money, because of my magic penis.
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#3
Quote by slapsymcdougal
I'd be fucking the boss's wife, so she'd be buying me stuff with his money, because of my magic penis.



yeah this
#5
The more you have the more you think you need. Human nature.

Kinda like the smarter and more educated you are, the more you know you don't know.
#6
Quote by slapsymcdougal
I'd be fucking the boss's wife, so she'd be buying me stuff with his money, because of my magic penis.

plot twist: the boss's wife is ur mum loLOlOloLoLOl
superman is killing himself tonight
#8
I don't believe in fair. If you are working for someone else, they can skew the ratio in any direction and as much as they want. Why? Because they founded the business that provided you the opportunity to work.

If you're not satisfied with your offered salary, you can either leverage your position / experience to negotiate a higher salary / better terms, or you can find another job or start your own business if you feel the employer is being greedy. No one is forcing you to be there. And if you're not in a position to do these things, it means you're just not that valuable to warrant a position where you can contemplate things like fair ratio.

> Should there be a limit to how much someone can make from the work of another?

No.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#9
Quote by Xiaoxi
I don't believe in fair. If you are working for someone else, they can skew the ratio in any direction and as much as they want. Why? Because they founded the business that provided you the opportunity to work.

If you're not satisfied with your offered salary, you can either leverage your position / experience to negotiate a higher salary / better terms, or you can find another job or start your own business if you feel the employer is being greedy. No one is forcing you to be there. And if you're not in a position to do these things, it means you're just not that valuable to warrant a position where you can contemplate things like fair ratio.

> Should there be a limit to how much someone can make from the work of another?

No.


Yes. They must be working voluntarily.
“Ignorance more frequently begets confidence than does knowledge.”
Charles Darwin
#12
When my dad was working in the local wood processing industry which was a big deal back then, there was a pretty great policy in place - at the end of the month before the wages were given out a list of paper was put on the notification board. That list of paper included the exact wages of every single employee in the company - from the very top right down to the bottom of the organizational structure.

My parents were still too young to experience the first iterations of workers' self-management but it would be very interesting to hear first hand what that was like.


Gozd in gora poj,
silen ženimo hrup,
uboga gmajna, le vpup, le vkup,
le vkup, le vkup z menoj,
staro pravdo v mrak tulimo,
da se pretulimo skozi to zimo
#13
A fair wage is the wage agreed on by the worker and the employer at the outset of employment.
#14
mfw individuals are okay with being underpaid - exploited - for their labour with the carrot on a stick of meritocracy dangled in front of them

doesn't even need to be a question of injustice to show what a donkey you are

Being realistic for a moment (or, rather, contextual), I guess I would accept at minimum 65-70% of what my labour is worth, but that's a whole other arbitrary field until one thoroughly lays out the economics of individuals jobs in as unbiased a way as possible, and that must be both in the market and in the company.

Way I see it, if I am to work for an exploiting or otherwise shitty corporation, small business, whatever, I will put into it what they decide to pay me for the full effort. As a private worker, if I am being commissioned to do a photoshoot, a piece of writing, a lecture or the like then yes, I can do the job for half the cost, but not at a professional level!

Ultimately what a person's labour is worth in capital is largely arbitrary, even when you do look at average pay levels.
they're coming to take me away
ha-haaa
Last edited by Banjocal at Nov 7, 2015,