#1
Hey guys, I have an old Yamaha dread with a big Crack in the top (right on the bottom edge, about a fist length from the lower bout). I've been doing some expirimenting in micing, and I was thinking about drilling a hole over where the Crack is, just big enough so that I can slide an SM57 in there. Sort of like micing a port on a bass drum. Is this gonna ruin my guitar? I can't imagine tonally it'll be a big deal, but is the drill gonna rip apart the bracing or anything?
#2
Well, the mic really should go on a stand about 3 feet in front of the guitar. (This assumes you're in a quiet room, not a noisy bar).

I think the frequency response would be massively screwed up with a mic inside the guitar. Plus, it would be most likely tantamount to begging for feedback issues. Although, "sound ports" are quite fashionable in high end guitars these days..

Anyway, that's my, "never have and never would, try it myself" take on that idea.

If you want to fix the crack on its own, you might try 1/64" aircraft plywood, (available at most larger hobby stores. You cut a strip of it to backup the crack, then fix it in place with the adhesive of your choice.

If you have the technology, a couple of pictures might be a big help to us...
#3
Heh, I took some earlier but forgot to post em, I'll put em at the bottom
But this is for studio recording... well "studio" recording, not live, so I'm not worried about feedback
And on the subject of mics in guitars, I currently have a AKG C214 in the lower bout of my Jumbo 12 String, laying on its back (the mic, that is) and with a little EQ and a Bass Cut Filter you get a nice sound (Im pairting it with abother 214 pointed at the neck joint)
As for the 3 feet thing, I respectfully decline :p. Im recording mainly instrumental stuff, and I love close micing. My room acoustics are crap, so I get a big sound from the close mics, and I add reverb at the end

This is the crack. I've never thought about fixing it, I didn't think you could.

This is about where I'd put it, maybe 1/8th an inch bigger than the circumference of the SM57
#4
Well, that's not a crack, it's a hole. Or perhaps more properly, a crack leading to a hole.

You could probably stabilize it the same way I explained, although it wouldn't pretty. Putting a blowout patch over it, would most likely stop it from running, especially it time with seasonal changes.

As for the mic inside inside the guitar, you're on your own with that. I wouldn't try it, but then I wouldn't have thought of it, nor do I have any experience with it either. Maybe someone else will ring it about it.

As for your room acoustics, doesn't your DAW have studio quality EQ, reverb & delay?

On a side note, it's a shame about the Yamaha. That's a right pretty piece of top wood on the old girl.

As for cutting a hole in the top, I think I'd use something like a Dremel tool on it, so as to avoid further cracking.

You can always stuff a mirror in the body to determine if there are any braces in the way.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 7, 2015,
#5
I should probably look into doing that
And I mean, it's just an idea. I'm not sure how serious I am about it
Yes, it does, but my ceiling and walls are shaped weird, and I have a lot of bulky furniture. It's really a mess
And it really is. I got it when I was young, and it was way too big for me. I didn't try it out at all, it was bought as a gift when I had no interest in acoustic. I always hated it. I'm not sure when the hole got there, me and my dad passed it around for a while. I didn't ever start appreciating it until a few weeks ago. I ended up Googling it and it turns out its a solid spruce top, I never really knew how good of a guitar it was (I know it's not a pro instrument, but it's not like a First Act either)
As for cutting it, I'm not sure what it's called, but there's a specific drill bit I remember using when I built my amp that I think I'd use for this
#7
putting a mic inside a dread seems like an excellent way to create feedback...

btw, my husband used a dremel to cut a soundport into one of our guitars. he did it bit by bit and it worked really well.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#8
Quote by patticake
putting a mic inside a dread seems like an excellent way to create feedback...
I already, "seconded that emotion"..er, beforehand

Quote by patticake
btw, my husband used a dremel to cut a soundport into one of our guitars. he did it bit by bit and it worked really well.
I'd be willing to bet he didn't cut it into the lower bout though....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 8, 2015,
#9
he's made a variety of cuts into a variety of guitars, but he has a good amount of wood and luthier experience and his own guitar workshop.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#10
Quote by patticake
putting a mic inside a dread seems like an excellent way to create feedback...

btw, my husband used a dremel to cut a soundport into one of our guitars. he did it bit by bit and it worked really well.


I've been thinking about turning a preamp hole into a soundport.
#11
Quote by Tony Done
I've been thinking about turning a preamp hole into a soundport.


some of the guys on AGF have done that and were pretty happy with it. is the preamp hole big enough to use without any more modding?
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#13
i'd suggest just getting it fixed. a luthier could splice-n-cleat in a piece of spruce into that hole and do some spot refinishing.

if you need a mic then just get an in guitar mic. grafting the 57 onto your guitar is just going to make it off balance and it will feel weird to play with the extra weight plus the cable.
#14
Wouldn't put a mic like that in a guitar, it doesn't have the right design to work in an enclosed space. Better to use a mic that pics up the sound directly from the wood (lay your ear on the guitar while playing it for comparison). The hole can be fixed by gluing a piece of hardwood underneath the hole (cross grained to the top) to keep it from spreading and to act as a level for a patch then fill in with something reasonably close to the appearance of the top's grain, doesn't matter much what type wood it is. I've done similar repairs and color matched the grain with water color paint. Square up the hole first to make fitting the patch easier.