#1
So I have a Jackson Rhoads electric guitar and got used to it. I went to a guitar shop and checked their acoustic collection. When I tried some of them I didn't like them because of the big body where I have to bend my arm around the body. Not only that, but I'm also used to Jackson rhoads guitar. I was wondering are there acoustic guitars that have a thinner body than a normal acoustic ? As thin as an electric guitar body or a little thicker is fine. If so what are they called ?
Last edited by Saloooh91 at Nov 9, 2015,
#2
Try thinline acoustics maybe? It's a style, not a brand. Look up Fender Stratacoustics or Telecoustics, or the epiphone el-diablo was another. Ovation makes several, too.
They were huge a few years ago (ok, like maybe 10 or so years ago)
Most, if not all, are acoustic/electric since the smaller bodies don't produce quite as much sound. Most have composite material backs, too.
Harmony: Stratocaster
Alvarez: F-200
Schecter: Omen 6
Fender: BXR-60
Dean: Metalman Z Bass (Betty)
Egnator: Tweaker 15
Pearl: Maximum
ESP/LTD: EXP-300
Custom: Harley Quinn Bass
Custom: TK-421 Explorer
A steadily growing supply of pedals
#4
the thing is that if you want a rich, louder tone, you need that bigger body. you don't mention a budget, but the cheaper thin body acoustics usually sound like cardboard like the yamaha APX series. the thin bowl ovations don't sound as good as the medium bowl versions to my ears, either. and both are still a lot deeper than a solid body electric.

but any guitar with a body almost as thin as an electric is going to be quiet, really quiet. if you only want it to play on the couch when alone or to record with, that could work, but we're talking really quiet.
Quote by Skeet UK
I just looked in my Oxford English Dictionary and under "Acoustic Guitar", there was your Avatar and an email address!
#5
Well first, what you're calling the"head", is actually the guitar's "body".

Here's something you can pretend is an acoustic guitar. It still has to be plugged in to actually matter in terms of sound output: Basically it's a "pretend acoustic guitar". With bronze acoustic strings and a piezo it would have the general character of acoustic guitars, but without the chamber resonance: http://www.espguitars.com/products/9490-tl-6-blk?category_id=1963552-tl-series-guitars



I considered buying one of these to jump around and do Townshend-esque windmills. Some people never grow up, I suppose.,.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 14, 2015,
#6
Get a normal size acoustic and learn to handle it, extend your horizons, so to speak. I specifically play all sizes of guitars, after a while it's no problem at all switching from one to another.
#7
Quote by Saloooh91
So I have a Jackson Rhoads electric guitar and got used to it. I went to a guitar shop and checked their acoustic collection. When I tried some of them I didn't like them because of the big body where I have to bend my arm around the body. Not only that, but I'm also used to Jackson rhoads guitar. I was wondering are there acoustic guitars that have a thinner body than a normal acoustic ? As thin as an electric guitar body or a little thicker is fine. If so what are they called ?


How much are you willing to spend? I played a Composite Acoustics Cargo last month and fell in love with it. It's a "travel" guitar (it doesn't sound like it), technically. It sounds like a full size dreadnaught, the action is low and the feel on the fingerboard is BUTTERY smooth. I played it, got hooked, and bought the damn thing. The body is thin, the neck is the most playable neck I've ever encountered (Taylor fan here, btw). It's body is just a little thicker than my electrics, and the guitar is almost the same length. The tuners are excellent...not that you'll be using them that much. This guitar doesn't go out of tune. I left it in the back seat of my car last week (got down to 37 degrees that night), took it into the 72 degree house in the morning and played it....STILL IN TUNE. Awesome stuff. The action is perfect and WILL ALWAYS BE PERFECT. I even dropped it last week (about 2 feet)....no problem.

$999 buys the non-electric version. $1399 gets the acoustic electric version. This guitar is a classic, guaranteed. Never need a neck reset, never have to worry about tuning/temp/humidity. Just do it man. This is my first "expensive" guitar....and I don't regret it a bit.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ufbWvFtRItI
#8
Quote by patticake
the thing is that if you want a rich, louder tone, you need that bigger body. you don't mention a budget, but the cheaper thin body acoustics usually sound like cardboard like the yamaha APX series. the thin bowl ovations don't sound as good as the medium bowl versions to my ears, either. and both are still a lot deeper than a solid body electric.

but any guitar with a body almost as thin as an electric is going to be quiet, really quiet. if you only want it to play on the couch when alone or to record with, that could work, but we're talking really quiet.



That isn't necessarily true Patti. I urge you to go play the CA Cargo. There is nothing tinny or thin about it's sound. Playability wise...it's amazing.
#9
I'm old, and have rather bad shoulders. I gave up playing dreadnaught-sized instruments some years ago.

There are a number of possibilities. First... A smaller guitar. We have OM, OOO, and parlor-sized instruments which are considerably smaller than the dreads and jumbos.
I have a Taylor GS Mini, and it's a fine-sounding instrument and quite comfortable.

Another possibility is the new generation of "crossover" guitars. These are almost all acoustic-electric, nylon-string, narrow-neck instruments. They are easy to play and tend to have compact bodies.
I just bought a Manuel Rodriquez model..... It's indeed a little on the quiet side acoustically but if you want volume you plug it in.
#10
Quote by Bikewer
I'm old, and have rather bad shoulders. I gave up playing dreadnaught-sized instruments some years ago.

There are a number of possibilities. First... A smaller guitar. We have OM, OOO, and parlor-sized instruments which are considerably smaller than the dreads and jumbos.
I have a Taylor GS Mini, and it's a fine-sounding instrument and quite comfortable.

Another possibility is the new generation of "crossover" guitars. These are almost all acoustic-electric, nylon-string, narrow-neck instruments. They are easy to play and tend to have compact bodies.
I just bought a Manuel Rodriquez model..... It's indeed a little on the quiet side acoustically but if you want volume you plug it in.
I do respect and enjoy watching our members persist in trying to help someone, long after they've stopped responding.

Oh well, I suppose rhetorical questions can be invaluable and evocative parts of our language.

OTOH, just for laughs, what say we don't answer any questions, and force the topic starters to bump the thread so as to declare their sincerity.

(OK, don't get bent out of shape anyone, I'm just joking).
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 14, 2015,
#11
^^^^ Some of us just like typing for the sake of it, and maybe hope that our meanderings will benefit the lurkers, if not the OP.

Skido is right IMO, most folks can get used to just about any well-set-up guitar (except maybe a bajo sexto ) if they haven't got a physical handicap
#12
Quote by Tony Done
^^^^ Some of us just like typing for the sake of it, and maybe hope that our meanderings will benefit the lurkers, if not the OP.
This has its parallel in human verbal behaviours as well. It's best described as, "liking to hear one's self talk"! Something in which I must admit I take great pleasure.

Admission absolves guilt.......er, doesn't it?

Quote by Tony Done
...Skido is right IMO, most folks can get used to just about any well-set-up guitar (except maybe a bajo sexto ) if they haven't got a physical handicap
ANDALE....!

Photo by Joe Mabel / GFDL granted by photographer
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 14, 2015,