#1
I am working on a cool jazz rock tune in C major with seventh chords. The verse uses a III-V-I-VII (Em7, G7, CM7,Bm7b5). The chorus ends walking down from C to F, and ends on a short G7. This is where i need some help for a transitional period. After the chorus I am going Em7, A7, and this is where im lost. I need a way to transition from the A7 smoothly back into the III-V-I-VII progression. I realize this is hard because the C# is an accidental. No matter what i try im having a tough time getting it to not sound really weird when it goes back to Em7. I am pretty new to actual applied theory. Any recommendations would be great, thanks in advance.
#2
Quote by jedke
I am working on a cool jazz rock tune in C major with seventh chords. The verse uses a III-V-I-VII (Em7, G7, CM7,Bm7b5). The chorus ends walking down from C to F, and ends on a short G7. This is where i need some help for a transitional period. After the chorus I am going Em7, A7, and this is where im lost. I need a way to transition from the A7 smoothly back into the III-V-I-VII progression. I realize this is hard because the C# is an accidental. No matter what i try im having a tough time getting it to not sound really weird when it goes back to Em7. I am pretty new to actual applied theory. Any recommendations would be great, thanks in advance.

The classic jazz method would be to introduce the ii-V of Em: that's F#m7b5-B7.
It could work just with B7, or with Am instead of F#m7b5 (but the latter is jazzier!).

BTW, in standard jazz tunes, Bm7b5 wouldn't be used as you're using it. If that's a turnaround back to Em7, then B7 would be more orthodox. Bm7b5 is more commonly used in key of Am, to go to Am via E7. (I'm not suggesting you change your sequence if you like the sound of it. Just offering info.... )
#3
Quote by jongtr
The classic jazz method would be to introduce the ii-V of Em: that's F#m7b5-B7.
It could work just with B7, or with Am instead of F#m7b5 (but the latter is jazzier!).

BTW, in standard jazz tunes, Bm7b5 wouldn't be used as you're using it. If that's a turnaround back to Em7, then B7 would be more orthodox. Bm7b5 is more commonly used in key of Am, to go to Am via E7. (I'm not suggesting you change your sequence if you like the sound of it. Just offering info.... )


Awesome i really like the sound of the II-V in Em, thanks a bunch for that!
#4
The A7 is a dominant for D. You may want to follow it with a Dm7 (you of course don't have to).

Actually, why not end the part after the chorus with Dm7-G7-Cmaj7? This way you are back in C major and you can start your verse progression again.


You could also modulate and play the second verse in a different key. You could modulate to D major - Em7-A7 is ii-V in D major. Just an idea, don't know how it would work in your song.
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#5
You do A7-Dm7-D#º7.

Remember to think about voice leading as well as root movement. A lot of jazz tunes avoid the generic Circle of 5ths sound by using tighter chromatic voice leading. Using the D# gets you the leading tone resolution up to Em while avoiding an awkward tonicization. Diminished 7th chords in jazz are functionally about the same as dominant 7ths (except when resolving to the actual tonic).
Last edited by cdgraves at Nov 11, 2015,