#1
Hi there.

Yeah, I know that this probably has been talked about before, but I wanted to hear some tips and tricks from you guys in here

From what I can read on the net, and on other forums, it all comes down to these elements:

- Amp distortion / OD/DS stompboxes - probably also stacking OD/DS.
- Delay(s) - stacking two delays.
- Ambience - either from mic position og from some form of reverb.
- EQ adjustments - more mid-range.
- Chorus. - but what kind og chorus and how much??

Is that some of the things you guys will suggest too??
Please let me know if you have other suggestions?

Thanks a lot!
#2
I've read and heard that many 80's hair metal style guitarists that maybe weren't that great used to use the neck pickup and two delays to cover up.Probably whatever studio trickery was available at the time too.I'm not saying using that stuff is necessarily a bad thing, just an 80's thing and you need that kind of delay to get that kind of sound and many allready great players did that too.Eventide harmonizers were common too.Pitch correction...Steve Vai kinds of stuff, high gain amps were really starting to be a new holy grail for tone, Soldano started making a name on recordings, huge Bradshaw racks, depends on what you mean but hair metal and guitar heroes was the 80's thing and a lot of that stuff guitarsoundwise was used on other stuff too.
Last edited by King Shredder at Nov 11, 2015,
#3
Well, that's a very broad question. I'll assume you mean a 80's style, classic metal type tone. I'll also assume, since you mentioned mics, that you are trying to record such a sound.

Anyway, your typical classic metal sound would come from a cranked mid-gain amp. I believe Marshall JCM-800's were very popular, and would be a good place to start.

I hear a lot of guitarists scooped out a lot of the mid frequencies on their amps. I personally am not a fan of that, and would recommend finding your own bass/mid/treble settings that suit you and sound good when recorded.

As for mics and their placement, I've heard that Shure SM58 mics were the general standard. Place it very close to the center of the speaker cone to start, and try moving/rotating it around until it sounds pleasing.

You will want a guitar with humbuckers; perhaps a Jackson Dinky or a B.C. Rich Warlock. There are countless options.

A pedal probably won't be necessary. Just crank your amp and/or use it's built-in gain/distortion controls. If you must use a pedal, or need high gain at low volume, perhaps something like a ProCo Rat since they were available in the 80's. Chorus and delay are generally used on solos to "flavour" them. I imagine that a ton of distortion and delay/chorus could mask sloppy playing a bit, but I don't recommend relying on that. Less is generally more when it comes to effects and gain/distortion.

That's all the advice I have the effort to type for now.
Last edited by slapfunk_101 at Nov 11, 2015,
#4
Quote by PedalFreak94
Hi there.

Yeah, I know that this probably has been talked about before, but I wanted to hear some tips and tricks from you guys in here

From what I can read on the net, and on other forums, it all comes down to these elements:

- Amp distortion / OD/DS stompboxes - probably also stacking OD/DS.
- Delay(s) - stacking two delays.
- Ambience - either from mic position og from some form of reverb.
- EQ adjustments - more mid-range.
- Chorus. - but what kind og chorus and how much??

Is that some of the things you guys will suggest too??
Please let me know if you have other suggestions?

Thanks a lot!


80's what? metal?, pop?, glam?, new wave?, country?, rock?, r&b? punk?, etc..

if you're talking metal you could use:
-a charvel
-a jcm 800
-a proco rat or a ts9 or a mxr d+
-a mxr delay
-a sm58
-a quadraverb
-a sonic maximizer

but we all just guessing what music you are really into right?
Last edited by ad_works at Nov 11, 2015,
#5
The 80s guitar tone is a vast ocean. Post a few YouTube reference tracks of the sound you are looking for and experienced players will point you in the right direction.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#6
ADA MP-1 preamps and Rockman headphone amps were the secret to a lot of 80s guitar tone. That and Marshall amps starved of voltage with a variac.
Last edited by jpnyc at Nov 11, 2015,
#7
Hi there, all!

Sorry, yeah I know that my question may be a little too open!
I'm looking for the classic 80's rock guitar tone/sound.
For example - Keith Scott (Bryan Adams) - and other rock guitarists.
So something like that.
I'm looking for some tips on what to do with the EQ settings and how exactly to use the chorus. I've often thought that the chorus can be too much, but maybe I have a bad chorus mode..
What can you tell me?
Thanks.
#8
Quote by PedalFreak94
Hi there, all!

Sorry, yeah I know that my question may be a little too open!
I'm looking for the classic 80's rock guitar tone/sound.
For example - Keith Scott (Bryan Adams) - and other rock guitarists.


Strat straight into Hiwatt with custom extra gain stage. Chorus may have been added in the house mix. Less is more with 80s chorus.

http://www.hiwatt.co.uk/news/hiwatt-catches-up-with-keith-scott
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#9
A Duncan JB pickup is the pickup choice for 80s hard rock.
Dave @ Seymour Duncan
#10
Scorpions 80's tone is a pretty good representation of the overall 80's style guitar tone.Not sure what gear they used exexpt i know some Soldano and other high gain heads were used.
#11
Quote by PedalFreak94
Hi there, all!

Sorry, yeah I know that my question may be a little too open!
I'm looking for the classic 80's rock guitar tone/sound.
For example - Keith Scott (Bryan Adams) - and other rock guitarists.
So something like that.
I'm looking for some tips on what to do with the EQ settings and how exactly to use the chorus. I've often thought that the chorus can be too much, but maybe I have a bad chorus mode..
What can you tell me?
Thanks.


think you're gonna have to give us a little more to work with here. the tone you mentioned is pretty straight forward rock and can be had any number of ways.

you need to give a budget and whether that includes fx or not. guessing you currently have a modeling amp of some sort.

oops that's what i get for not checking your profile first. dude idf you can't get that tone out of what you have then something is wrong. what exactly is alluding you?
Last edited by monwobobbo at Nov 11, 2015,
#12
Quote by slapfunk_101
Well, that's a very broad question. I'll assume you mean a 80's style, classic metal type tone. I'll also assume, since you mentioned mics, that you are trying to record such a sound.

Anyway, your typical classic metal sound would come from a cranked mid-gain amp. I believe Marshall JCM-800's were very popular, and would be a good place to start.

I hear a lot of guitarists scooped out a lot of the mid frequencies on their amps. I personally am not a fan of that, and would recommend finding your own bass/mid/treble settings that suit you and sound good when recorded.

As for mics and their placement, I've heard that Shure SM58 mics were the general standard. Place it very close to the center of the speaker cone to start, and try moving/rotating it around until it sounds pleasing.

You will want a guitar with humbuckers; perhaps a Jackson Dinky or a B.C. Rich Warlock. There are countless options.

A pedal probably won't be necessary. Just crank your amp and/or use it's built-in gain/distortion controls. If you must use a pedal, or need high gain at low volume, perhaps something like a ProCo Rat since they were available in the 80's. Chorus and delay are generally used on solos to "flavour" them. I imagine that a ton of distortion and delay/chorus could mask sloppy playing a bit, but I don't recommend relying on that. Less is generally more when it comes to effects and gain/distortion.

That's all the advice I have the effort to type for now.


Not only the tone but also the style!
Are you really need wigs?
Some of us just cannot find the tone and the smell od 80s. They have their characters on their hair. Lang hair or locken hair. They can now achieve the hair style They have always wanted and better still they can re-style it, sleep, shower, engage in sport activities and live in it as if it was your normal hair.
Lot's of words, just want to remenber the felling of my hair style when I am singing.
#13
Not only the tone but also the style!
Are you really need wigs?
Some of us just cannot find the tone and the smell od 80s. They have their characters on their hair. Lang hair or locken hair. They can now achieve the hair style They have always wanted and better still they can re-style it, sleep, shower, engage in sport activities and live in it as if it was your normal hair.
http://www.prettywighair.com/
Lot's of words, just want to remenber the felling of my hair style when I am singing.
#14
Hi again!

Haha, glad that you looked at my profile - yup, there's a lot more information there, sorry for this post lacking some..
But yeah, I think I should be able to recreate some good 80's sounds with my gear - and I'll try it later today!
What I mostly wanted to know was what effects that were really used and made the whole sound. So I think I have an idea about that now.
High-gain amps, chorus, stacked delays, eq mix, ambience and stacked OD/DS boxes.

Keep posting your tips and tricks if you have any left :-)
#15
Quote by PedalFreak94


Keep posting your tips and tricks if you have any left :-)


naw, time for you to do some work.
#16
Quote by ad_works
naw, time for you to do some work.


Well, I think I've told all I was thinking..
So really just wanted to hear what people had to say about the tone and topic.
Sorry if I offended you, sir..
#18
Quote by ad_works
80's what? metal?, pop?, glam?, new wave?, country?, rock?, r&b? punk?, etc..

if you're talking metal you could use:
-a charvel
-a jcm 800
-a proco rat or a ts9 or a mxr d+
-a mxr delay
-a sm58
-a quadraverb
-a sonic maximizer

but we all just guessing what music you are really into right?


+1 on the BBE Sonic Maximizer
"A well-wound coil is a well-wound coil regardless if it's wound with professional equipment, or if somebody's great-grandmother winds it to an old French recipe with Napoleon's modified coffee grinder and chops off the wire after a mile with an antique guillotine!"
- Bill Lawrence

Come and be with me
Live my twisted dream
Pro devoted pledge
Time for primal concrete sledge

#19
Quote by King Shredder
Scorpions 80's tone is a pretty good representation of the overall 80's style guitar tone.Not sure what gear they used exexpt i know some Soldano and other high gain heads were used.

They used Marshall. Maybe not 100 percent of their career, but you can bet a JCM800 will nail "Rock You Like a Hurricane"

80s is not high gain at all; it's more of a fat, aggressive rock tone with gated reverb and the like on top of it. There were many solos, but at the heart of it were crunchy power chords and riffs. If you play most 80s amps like the JCM 800 and the like, you think early heavy metal more than Glam Rock. Throw some effects to give it that arena sound, then you'll hear it.