#1
I wanted to attend college for music and was wondering what I should be familiar with in music. I know how to read basic notes in 1 position second and fifth and also 12 position. I also have a basic foundation for classical finger style playing. I'm 15 and wondering what I should familar with in music to get somewhere.

Thank you.
#2
if you are talking about a place like berkely then you'd need to know way more. they also make you audition to be accepted. depends on what exactly you mean by college for music
#3
When you say "Go to college for music" I assume you mean study guitar? What style guitar? Classical? Jazz? What schools? I'd recommend looking at the entry processes for the schools you are interested in and look specifically at their auditions process. You'll likely need to know your modes in each position, sight reading, basic music theory, ect ect. Start taking lessons if you aren't already. Try to talk to peopel who have been through the process. Visit the schools.
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#4
Quote by TheStig1214
When you say "Go to college for music" I assume you mean study guitar? What style guitar? Classical? Jazz? What schools? I'd recommend looking at the entry processes for the schools you are interested in and look specifically at their auditions process. You'll likely need to know your modes in each position, sight reading, basic music theory, ect ect. Start taking lessons if you aren't already. Try to talk to peopel who have been through the process. Visit the schools.


I play mostly rock and metal but I that I know that any body can do basic power chords and Palm muting and won't do me any good. I think that maybe I should more Jazz it just that I never understand modes so well. Can you please explain to me what a mode is?
And also somewhere like Berkly like the other guy said
#5
Quote by hulkisexy
I play mostly rock and metal but I that I know that any body can do basic power chords and Palm muting and won't do me any good. I think that maybe I should more Jazz it just that I never understand modes so well. Can you please explain to me what a mode is?
And also somewhere like Berkly like the other guy said


This is a start:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AuvPFXNVzX0

But really, get yourself a guitar teacher who knows music theory or take as many music theory and composition classes in high school you can.
Gibson RD Silverburst w/ Lace Dissonant Aggressors (SOLD)
Electra Omega Prime Ceruse
Fender Franken-Jag Bass

Amps and the like:
Laney VH100R
Seismic Luke 2x12
Dunlop 105Q Wah
Gojira FX 808
Line 6 M9
#6
Quote by TheStig1214
This is a start:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AuvPFXNVzX0

But really, get yourself a guitar teacher who knows music theory or take as many music theory and composition classes in high school you can.


I do have a music teacher who understands music theory and everything it's just that I just wanted to do it on my own.

I'm the the best in the class ha ha
#7
Quote by hulkisexy
I play mostly rock and metal but I that I know that any body can do basic power chords and Palm muting and won't do me any good. I think that maybe I should more Jazz it just that I never understand modes so well. Can you please explain to me what a mode is?
And also somewhere like Berkly like the other guy said


Berkely will require you to be able to read music and have a decent knowledge of guitar already. as i mentioned you have to audition to be accepted. it's not meant to teach you how to play the guitar on a basic level but rather is an advanced school. sounds like you would be better off at this point getting a good teacher (perhaps someone that has gone to one of those schools) and learn that way before considering going to music college.
#8
1) It's BerkLEE

2) Modes have nothing to do with gaining entrance to a music school

3) If you want to go to school for guitar, you have a lot of catching up to do, so get a college-educated teacher ASAP

There aren't a lot of places that will take a novice guitarist. A decent music school will require that you can sight read in multiple positions, know your basic major and minor scales in a number of keys, and can play a few pieces without mistakes. Typically, classical or jazz are your choices.

And think about what school you want to go to and why. Why Berklee, specifically? What program do they offer that you're interested in? What other music schools have you looked at?

I know these are big questions if you're only halfway through high school, but getting into college to study an instrument is not like getting in to study English or Biology. It's a major commitment that puts you on track to play music for a living, and not a lot else. It's a serious choice and deservers careful consideration.
Last edited by cdgraves at Nov 13, 2015,
#9
My comments are not meant to discourage you. For that matter I admire your desire to seriously study music but you need to decide if you just want to learn about guitar or are interested in a career in music and possibly getting a college level degree in music arts. What is your goal and do you have a backup plan? If you just want to learn to play guitar better you don't need to go to Berklee and did you even did you check out how much Berklee costs and can you afford it?

If you are thinking about studying for a degree in music you need a lot more than just being a good basic guitar player. You need to become really proficient on guitar in many styles and learn to sight read extremely well. You also need to be good on at least one more instrument (I recommend you start taking piano lessons). It was mentioned above that you need to audition to get into Berklee and that's true of any college level or advanced music program as well. If someone placed a piece of sheet music in front of you that you never saw before, can you play it? That will most likely be part of the audition.

Lastly...no, you can't do it on your own. I know a good friend who got into a very good music school who during his last year of high school played in the school jazz band, marching band, sang in the vocal chorus and had two teachers outside of school that he saw every week, one just for theory alone.

Don't get discouraged by this, if you have the passion, go for it. It's apparent that you need to play a little catch up but it's still possible if you start now. Are you involved in your school's music programs like band, chorus or anything music related? If not start there. It's free, and you'll start hanging out with musicians of various levels and learn about different instruments. Get it going now. You still have time if you really dedicate yourself to it.

I just checked the cost of Berklee. Wow!!

Tuition and fees $40,082 (2015-16)
Room and board $17,546 (2015-16)

http://colleges.usnews.rankingsandreviews.com/best-colleges/berklee-college-2126
Yes I am guitarded also, nice to meet you.
Last edited by Rickholly74 at Nov 13, 2015,
#10
Quote by hulkisexy
I wanted to attend college for music and was wondering what I should be familiar with in music. I know how to read basic notes in 1 position second and fifth and also 12 position. I also have a basic foundation for classical finger style playing. I'm 15 and wondering what I should familar with in music to get somewhere.

Thank you.


If you want to attend music in college and you are 15 - sign up for classical guitar lessons at your local University now. You'll learn how to read music, play complex college -level music and know your entire fretboard. Run through the first year curriculum. Do that for a year at least. You could also take some jazz lessons as well if that's your thing. Since you're into metal, classical is a better fit I think.

The smartest thing to do would be to pick the college you want to attend and take lessons with one of the profs there via skype or in person - they can prep you for the curriculum and you would be practically guaranteed a spot if you're up to par since you'll have a connection to the school already.
Last edited by reverb66 at Nov 13, 2015,
#11
A good way to think about a scale is that it is a recipe for creating a sound palette to work with. The recipe says what intervals to use (e.g. 1,2,3,4,5,6,7 for major scale, or 1, b3, 4, b5,5, b7, for minor blues scale etc.) The start note determines then the exact notes you get, using the recipe. You then put these different intervals to work ... some will make the ear want to hear a different interval following on, others don't. For example, in major scale, the 4 sets up an expectation for 3, and 7 sets up an expectation for 1 above, 2 for 1 below, 6 for 5. Similarly, in the blues, the b5 sets up an expectation for 4 or 5. These intervals can be grouped into chords and so on, and progressions. The progressions tend to give the impression that the 1 of the scale is the centre of the music focus ("the tonal centre"), as do the choice of intervals in a melody (which ones get the emphasis).

This same concept applies to pretty much most scales ... so modes are just other recipes. It's true they originate from parent scale recipes ... but it's a waste of time knowing that ... you need to know hopw to use the recipe, same as above.

So, Dorian for example is (1,2,b3,4,5,6,b7) ... b7 sets up expectation of 1, or 5, mostly. 6 to 5. And so on. If you're happy to accept major scale without questioning its recipe, then I stronglt suggest you do the same with the various modes ... accept them as they are and learn how to use their sounds ... and poay lip service to where they originate from (it's worrying about their origin that causes all the unnecessary confusion)
Last edited by jerrykramskoy at Nov 13, 2015,
#12
Quote by reverb66
If you want to attend music in college and you are 15 - sign up for classical guitar lessons at your local University now. You'll learn how to read music, play complex college -level music and know your entire fretboard. Run through the first year curriculum. Do that for a year at least. You could also take some jazz lessons as well if that's your thing. Since you're into metal, classical is a better fit I think.

The smartest thing to do would be to pick the college you want to attend and take lessons with one of the profs there via skype or in person - they can prep you for the curriculum and you would be practically guaranteed a spot if you're up to par since you'll have a connection to the school already.



My teacher has college experience and is my teacher and home room he makes us read music and so far I know the key of C,G,and A in 1,2,4,5,12 position
#13
Why exactly do you want to go to school for that? If you want to to learn shit, well like everyone else has mentioned, you gotta know your shit just to get in. It probably still depends on the school..

Regardless my advice would be to also get all your techniques down and be able to play, just as a single recommendation, tumeni notes by Steve Morse. I say this because I learned so much about theory n shit, then I decided I wasn't happy with my skill level. Theory don't mean shit unless you can use it.
#14
Check out Pebber Brown on YouTube he's got loads of free lessons and he use to teach at Berklee.
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#15
Disorganized lessons on tremolo picking and exotic scales aren't getting anyone into music school. A real teacher is necessary.

Quote by hulkisexy
My teacher has college experience and is my teacher and home room he makes us read music and so far I know the key of C,G,and A in 1,2,4,5,12 position


What's your repertoire look like? Do you have any favorite pieces that showcase the guitar? And is your teacher able to give you private lessons specifically to achieve the goal of music school admission? A lot of music school applicants who are already really good at their instrument spend well over a year getting their audition pieces ready.

if I were you, I'd decide right away whether to do a jazz, classical, or nontraditional program and pick out audition pieces. You need time to learn the pieces, listen to different versions of them, and decide exactly how you want it to sound in performance. It's essential that you give a real performance of the music, not just play the right notes at the right times.

It's easy enough to learn the scales and chords you'll be asked to play, so your focus should be on playing actual music and sight reading.

Do your research on music school, choose the ones you like, and look at the audition requirements.
Last edited by cdgraves at Nov 14, 2015,
#16
^^^^ Good advice, IMO.

My daughter went into performing arts, she had, IIRC about a one-in five chance of getting a place. A lot of applicants went home in tears after the first cut. It isn't an easy option, the world is full of wannabees. You need serious tuition if you want to make a career out of music via the academic route.
Last edited by Tony Done at Nov 14, 2015,
#17
Is there a particular school you wanted to get into? Audition requirements tend to vary depending on the school, but, as a rule of thumb, it's a good idea to have repertoire that is from different periods and in different styles. Well, for classical anyway, if you're looking for jazz then I'm not sure. And there is usually a sight reading exam, and a theory exam as well so be prepared for that. Start visiting schools and talking to professors and students now.

That said, I'm a classical voice student at a community college so things are going to be a little different because I'm looking to transfer rather than go in right after high school, and, you know, it's a different instrument. But, from talking to my friends who are studying classical guitar, we seem to have to prepare in similar ways.
#18
Quote by hulkisexy
I wanted to attend college for music and was wondering what I should be familiar with in music. I know how to read basic notes in 1 position second and fifth and also 12 position. I also have a basic foundation for classical finger style playing. I'm 15 and wondering what I should familar with in music to get somewhere.

Thank you.



I'm sure that the University will test your knowledge base first and recommend remedial classes, if needed. If not, closely question the counselor and see what is offered.
#19
Quote by TobusRex
I'm sure that the University will test your knowledge base first and recommend remedial classes, if needed. If not, closely question the counselor and see what is offered.


They may, but that also means they aren't admitting you to the program yet. You might get into the college generally, but unless you meet all the requirements, you aren't majoring in music.

Very few schools offer music like they do liberal arts or science classes. You can't just declare it your major and get a degree by completing credits. The majority of music schools (the ones worth paying for anyway) require that you have some level of non-basic proficiency, if not very advanced skills.

You can get a degree in English Lit just by learning a lot about literature and writing some essays. With music, you actually have to show that you can do what you've studied, by giving performances of seriously difficult music.
#20
To the OP: Lots of good info here. Don't get discouraged by the depth of this discussion. This is a good outline of the direction you need to go in if you are serious about an advanced music education on any instrument. You can do it if you start now and work hard. Practice everyday and get a teacher who has the same background you plan on pursuing. If your guitar teacher is just a good player who teaches part time but hasn't been to a college or music school like you are looking into, you seriously need to find someone else who has been through it and can prepare you and share their knowledge of what it will take to get you to that advanced level.

You made a good first step by asking here on the forum. Good luck.
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