#1
What Jazz standards does every guitarist need to know? I have three real books and its a little intimidating trying to figure out what songs to learn first. My initial thought is that I should learn all the songs that everybody knows first, am I right in thinking this?
#2
All of them. There's never been a guitarist worth his salt who can't play every jazz song anybody's ever heard of.
Guitars
Schecter Hellraiser C-1FR, C-1 Classic, Hellraiser Hybrid Solo-II, Special Edition E-1FR-S
Orange Rockerverb 50 212
Basses
Yamaha RBX374 and Washburn MB-6
#3
Yes I was going to say "all of them", but there are still some more popular ones it's good to memorise. (The others you can sight-read after all, if you have to, yes?)

I'd start with these (off the top of my head):

Autumn Leaves
I Got Rhythm (for all the tunes that use the same sequence)
Summertime
All the Things you are
Stella by Starlight
Body and Soul
Satin Doll
Night and Day
Round Midnight
Girl from Ipanema
Misty
Georgia on my mind
...
...
etc
etc

more to come....
#4
Quote by the_bi99man
All of them. There's never been a guitarist worth his salt anybody's ever heard of.


This.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#6
Quote by jongtr
Yes I was going to say "all of them", but there are still some more popular ones it's good to memorise. (The others you can sight-read after all, if you have to, yes?)

I'd start with these (off the top of my head):

Autumn Leaves
I Got Rhythm (for all the tunes that use the same sequence)
Summertime
All the Things you are
Stella by Starlight
Body and Soul
Satin Doll
Night and Day
Round Midnight
Girl from Ipanema
Misty
Georgia on my mind
...
...
etc
etc

more to come....


Solid list.

I would add that you should play along to older versions that have a singer when possible. If you know the vocal it's much easier to remember the forms of the tunes and to play them coherently. If you only learn instrumental versions you're not getting whole picture.
#7
Quote by reverb66
Solid list.

I would add that you should play along to older versions that have a singer when possible. If you know the vocal it's much easier to remember the forms of the tunes and to play them coherently. If you only learn instrumental versions you're not getting whole picture.
Absolutely.
Miles Davis used to say that it helped him play ballads if he thought of the lyrics.

Also, a very common job for a guitarist playing jazz standards is accompanying singers.
That ALSO means that you need to be able to play those songs in a few different keys! - so check the keys that the great jazz singers sang them in (as many versions as you can find), and learn them in at least those keys.
#8
Quote by reverb66
Solid list.

I would add that you should play along to older versions that have a singer when possible. If you know the vocal it's much easier to remember the forms of the tunes and to play them coherently. If you only learn instrumental versions you're not getting whole picture.


Very useful to try and copy vocals on guitar, including the nuances. Can be quite challenging, but really informative ... helps getting better at phrasing (same is true trying to get down some of the sax lines)
#9
Quote by jongtr
Absolutely.
Miles Davis used to say that it helped him play ballads if he thought of the lyrics.

Also, a very common job for a guitarist playing jazz standards is accompanying singers.
That ALSO means that you need to be able to play those songs in a few different keys! - so check the keys that the great jazz singers sang them in (as many versions as you can find), and learn them in at least those keys.


yes..this is where learning tunes by Roman numbers helps a great deal..much easier to learn and transpose tunes in different keys
play well

wolf