#1
Hi all
ive been told that i need a valve amp for my multi effects pedal ? i currently have a blackstar id core amp (solid state) and it dosnt seem to work through it its only for bedroom/local jamming defo not gigging so whats your thoughts on this and any recommendations please
#2
No you don't.
Generally speaking, valve amps take dirt pedals (Overdrive. Distortion, Fuzz) better, although most of the lower end multi effects pedals don't do dirt that well to begin with.
Most multi effects pedals do have a headphone jack, so if your multi effects pedal has a headphone out jack, you don't even need an amp.

If you want a new amp, then go shopping and try some out and pick what you like best.
I would avoid the Marshall MG series and the Line 6 Spider series amps though.
#4
Quote by kevinharrison01
Hi all
ive been told that i need a valve amp for my multi effects pedal ? i currently have a blackstar id core amp (solid state) and it dosnt seem to work through it its only for bedroom/local jamming defo not gigging so whats your thoughts on this and any recommendations please
Well, there are many facets to this. But generally valve amps take pedals and multi-effects better than solid state amps.

But if you have dirt dialed in on the amp and you put a multi-effects in the front of the amp (the regular input), you will likely end up overloading that preamp section and you will not have a good sound. Especially if you have heavy delay or reverb trails or distortion on the multi-effects unit. That is with either tube or ss amps. SS amps are, in my experience, less happy about multis in any regard, set clean or not.

Also, if you are trying to get dirt from the multi-effects unit, it will not sound very good, as Codemonk has said. They do not often to dirt very well, especially when put into a physical amp. So if either of those two cases apply to you, a better/tube amp will not help.

What I suggest to do is to get a nice tube amp with an effects loop and individual drive pedals. Put the drive pedals in front of the amp (the regular input) or use the amps distortion mostly, and put the multi-effects in the effects loop for just reverb, delay, etc.

Another option would be to just use the multi-effects and use a ~full range flat response method of amplification. So headphones or a powered speaker. That way there is no other wizardry happening to the signal besides what the multi-effects does.
Last edited by Will Lane at Nov 13, 2015,