#2
Disadvantage is, it won't sound exactly like Marty Friedman played it.

But hey, there is no right or wrong in music. Still, you should learn things the "proper" way. Sometimes I get lazy and do legato on stuff that should be fast alternate picking, but I eventually stop being a lazy ass and pick everything I have to pick.

I don't know what is your definition of begginer, but for me, I don't know how a begginer could be playing that solo or even attempting to play it
Last edited by DanyFS at Nov 13, 2015,
#3
It's a huge stretch to play it properly so it just won't sound proper. No big deal.
#4
Quote by DanyFS

I don't know what is your definition of begginer, but for me, I don't know how a begginer could be playing that solo or even attempting to play it


This.

Plus, as has been said, tapping will sound different to the original solo...but then tapping isn't exactly a 'beginner' technique, either...
#6
Quote by reverb66
The best solo in metal history.


Funny
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#7
Quote by theogonia777
Funny


Great insight. What's the best in your opinion?
#8
If we are going for cliched guitar hero sounding stuff, Scarified maybe. I don't think that that's really good metal soloing though. It's all more like 80s arena rock stuff than metal. You know, guys like Friedman, Gilbert, Yngwie, etc. They can play nice and all, but is it metal? It's too melodic and not chaotic enough. It's like, no matter how fast Yngwie or whoever goes, it doesn't sound frenzied enough.

Like compare The solos on Kill 'Em All, like on Whiplash or whatever. Or like any of Terrance Hobbs's stuff. It's raw, it's energetic, it sounds like it's almost completely out of control. Marty or Paul always sound like they are completely under control even with their fingers going a million miles per hour.

That's really the key to a great metal solo. Raw energy, with speed and the percussive sound of the pick hitting the strings as a texture and less emphasis on things like harmony. There can be some melody, but it shouldn't sound like something out of a power ballad. Folky and doomy melodies are cool, but it shouldn't sound like something that you would hear on a Whitesnake.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
#9
Quote by theogonia777
If we are going for cliched guitar hero sounding stuff, Scarified maybe. I don't think that that's really good metal soloing though. It's all more like 80s arena rock stuff than metal. You know, guys like Friedman, Gilbert, Yngwie, etc. They can play nice and all, but is it metal? It's too melodic and not chaotic enough. It's like, no matter how fast Yngwie or whoever goes, it doesn't sound frenzied enough.

Like compare The solos on Kill 'Em All, like on Whiplash or whatever. Or like any of Terrance Hobbs's stuff. It's raw, it's energetic, it sounds like it's almost completely out of control. Marty or Paul always sound like they are completely under control even with their fingers going a million miles per hour.

That's really the key to a great metal solo. Raw energy, with speed and the percussive sound of the pick hitting the strings as a texture and less emphasis on things like harmony. There can be some melody, but it shouldn't sound like something out of a power ballad. Folky and doomy melodies are cool, but it shouldn't sound like something that you would hear on a Whitesnake.


I find Friedman to be very raw, much less calculated than most 80's players, including Gilbert,Hammett or ygnvie. He has a very strange approach to bends and phrasing for example and the Tornado of souls solo in particular has a very chaotic passage at the end that is practically gibberish. I'll admit he's still very melodic.

I'll check out Hobbes - never heard of him.