#1
I've picked up a cheap Jackson DR-7 for the chugs, and in F standard the bottom strings are ending up a semitone or more out of tune by the end of the song. What can I do to help this? Obviously higher gauge strings next time I string it, would a string tensioner or string tree help?
I'm sure better tuners, or even locking ones would have a great effect, but I can't really afford that right now.

Many thanks
#2
Locking tuners don't affect your tuning. They make it faster to restring.
Don't bother with a string tensioner or string tree.

You should only have a few (three?) wraps around the tuner post on your lowest strings. If your strings are new, and if you're hammering, they'll go flat for a while.

Mind if I ask what you're calling "F Standard" tuning? What are the bottom strings tuned to and what gauge strings re you using?
#3
Quote by dspellman
Locking tuners don't affect your tuning. They make it faster to restring.
Don't bother with a string tensioner or string tree.

You should only have a few (three?) wraps around the tuner post on your lowest strings. If your strings are new, and if you're hammering, they'll go flat for a while.

Mind if I ask what you're calling "F Standard" tuning? What are the bottom strings tuned to and what gauge strings re you using?


I took a bit of a guess with F Standard, I don't have a clue what it is called, but this:
F Bb Eb G# G# C# F Bb
And they're not wrapped half as much as are sensible, but I can't fix that without putting new strings on it; it came with new strings on it.

Verniers say the 7th string is 1.8mm and the 6th is 1.5mm.
#4
Quote by dragonzrmetal
I can't fix that without putting new strings on it; it came with new strings on it.

Well there's your first solution. I've always found only one or two wraps is ideal on the bass strings, maybe three or four on the top strings. Make sure the winds are even and neatly stacked - the goal is basically to string in such a way that changes in tension - most noticeably bending - don't cause the strings to shift on the post. The more winds, and the less snugly they're stacked, the more potential there is, when the string has a brief increase in tension, for something to jump or ping or slide half a millimetre and leave you that little bit more out of tune. Lots of people swear by various methods of "knotting" strings to keep them in place, too. Always worth a try, but I find such methods fiddly and obstructive to the more important aspect that is the actual winding.

As you already seem to have realised, if you're okay with thicker strings, they'll generally be more stable. That said, increasing string gauge may well mean you need to expand the nut slots to let the strings move freely.

A decent nut is crucial to decent stability; unless you have an absolutely crap bridge this tends to be the second thing to look at after your strings and stringing method, but I don't think you'll actually need to do anything to the nut; the strings should be plenty to sort this out. Never hurts to put a bit of pencil lead in the slots, though, to keep the string sliding nicely.

Locking tuners and suchlike are great, especially with non-locking tremolos, because they eliminate the issue of poor restringing, but on a hardtail they will very rarely be the solution to your problem.

A string tree will be counterproductive for this - they create more friction, which in general is the cause of tuning issues. Their purpose is to prevent a string having too little downward force (therefore losing sustain or shifting out of place) at the nut, which is a separate issue, and while I've never heard the term "string tensioner", if it's anything along the same lines it's a misnomer (scale length, pitch and the string itself are the only things that can affect the actual string tension) and has the same issue.

I suspect decent restringing will get you where you want to be with this, good luck

EDIT: Actually, looking at your vernier measurements, did you put heavier strings on this guitar since you bought it? There's no way that's the stock gauge. If you or the previous owner increased the string gauge without doing anything to the nut, the issue is probably the strings catching in the slots.
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#5
Do you know if the strings are properly stretched and broken in? Any new set of strings that aren't will go out of tune constantly until they are stabilized. Good luck.
#6
Quote by dragonzrmetal
I took a bit of a guess with F Standard, I don't have a clue what it is called, but this:
F Bb Eb G# G# C# F Bb
And they're not wrapped half as much as are sensible, but I can't fix that without putting new strings on it; it came with new strings on it.

Verniers say the 7th string is 1.8mm and the 6th is 1.5mm.


First item: Generally you want to designate your tuning using all flats or all sharps. Thus, Ab rather than G#, Db rather than C#, etc., if the rest are listed as flats.
Is your *bottom* string tuned to F? Would that be F1 (43.65Hz)?
And the two middle strings tuned to the same note?

Where did you find this tuning used? Particularly on a 7...
#7
It's probably the strings then, not my fault, I bought it second hand, but the guy who strung them, well, they weren't even all going round the peg once.

It has a replacement bone nut and it looks quite nicely done, the strings might be sticking in the slots, but I won't file it out any further because I won't be sticking with strings this heavy. Any suggestions for string gauge in BEADGBE?

I won't worry with locking tuners then, I'll just put in regular grovers at a later date if I find I have nothing better to do.

Thanks a ton
#8
Quote by dspellman
First item: Generally you want to designate your tuning using all flats or all sharps. Thus, Ab rather than G#, Db rather than C#, etc., if the rest are listed as flats.
Is your *bottom* string tuned to F? Would that be F1 (43.65Hz)?
And the two middle strings tuned to the same note?

Where did you find this tuning used? Particularly on a 7...


Why is that? I always went by A, Bb, B, C, C#, D, Eb, E, F, F#, G, G#, I thought that was just the convention.

Also, I meant F A# D# G# C# F# A#, my bad. It's what Songsterr lists Meshuggah's tuning as for most their stuff around Obzen and such.

Oh, and it looks like the guy had neglected to stretch the strings out. Tuning stability did come back after I did that.
#9
the trussrod is the first concern , my brothers guitarist and me had the same high end bc rich warbeast nj deluxe which at the time was the highest end production model they had for 2012, i had zero tuning stability issues, his guitar constantly went out of tune, what we found out was the bow in the neck was the issue. I'm starting with this right away because F standard is an unorthodox tuning if the guitar was used or bought recently this is one way to do so.

I agree locking tuners just make it easier to re-string , they are a hassle , however a quality set of tuners like 18:1 grovers , sperzel , schaller , gotoh should do the trick

a graphtech tusq nut you should be able to afford, they improve the tuning stabillity a lot. 7 string ones may be a hassle and if you can get the old plastic nut out of the guitar assuming it isn't a floating tremolo you should be fine.

anyone have experience with the pencil graphite and vasilene trick from the 70s or 80s? i heard some guys do it to improve tuning stability but never tried it myself.

i'm out of ideas besides that