#1
So I'm currently using the trick where I use a compressor with high sustain to fight noise gates so that I can set the gates high and when I mute, it mutes fast and there's no feedback and it's very responsive.

My question is, I have a very nice high gain amp. Will using the compressor before metal tones make the tone sound generic and just like any other amp or will it still keep the tone of the amp, it's just more compressed? Like am I missing out of something doing this?

I use the Wampler Ego Compressor with:

Sustain: Full
Tone: 0
Attack: Full
Blend: Full
And volume at whatever I need

Also a quick question on the attack knob, although I imagine it only really matters in clean, if I want the MOST attack, would put it all the way to the right? The way it was described in the manual says something about how fast the compressor fades in but it was a little unclear which way ultimately led to more attack.
Last edited by Knight Elijah at Nov 16, 2015,
#2
The attack sets how quickly the compressor works. At it lowest setting full counter-clockwise (all the way left), it's working at it's fastest setting meaning it's compressing everything almost immediately. As you increase the attack knob you are delaying the speed at which the compressor is activating so the higher you go the longer it takes for the compressor to start affecting the signal. This is good because normally you don't want everything compressed because you will miss the initial attack of the notes in your playing and miss some of the punch at the beginning of the notes. All the way to the right delays the attack time, all the way to the left is the shortest time. Try putting your attack knob at 12:00 and adjust from there depending on your playing technique. The sustain knob will set the ratio of the compression. At higher values it compresses more.


http://www.tenthegg.co.uk/tips/t018/
Attack

The attack control simply sets the time, in milliseconds (ms), that it takes the compression to react after the threshold level has been exceeded. Setting a very fast attack time is great for controlling the peaks but can produce a more noticeably compressed sound. By using a longer attack time you can allow the initial peak through and compress the body of the sound which follows.
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Last edited by Rickholly74 at Nov 16, 2015,
#3
Quote by Rickholly74
The attack sets how quickly the compressor works. At it lowest setting full counter-clockwise (all the way left), it's working at it's fastest setting meaning it's compressing everything almost immediately. As you increase the attack knob you are delaying the speed at which the compressor is activating so the higher you go the longer it takes for the compressor to start affecting the signal. This is good because normally you don't want everything compressed because you will miss the initial attack of the notes in your playing and miss some of the punch at the beginning of the notes. All the way to the right delays the attack time, all the way to the left is the shortest time. Try putting your attack knob at 12:00 and adjust from there depending on your playing technique. The sustain knob will set the ratio of the compression. At higher values it compresses more.


Ahh okay that makes sense, I thought it being compressed faster resulted in more attack but now I understand. Also one more thing

With the tone knob... If I don't want it to change my tone would 12:00 be unchanged? Or would all the way left be unchanged? Like if I put the tone knob to 0 would it take my tone away from my original sound? And then normal would be 12 and past 12 is added? Or is anything other than 0 added tone?

It's always hard to tell exactly what the voicings of the knobs are. And if it is in relation to the original sound or just to what is added
Last edited by Knight Elijah at Nov 16, 2015,
#4
I don't know about the tone knob as my compressors don't have a "tone" control. I'm sure someone here will have an answer. Reading the reviews of this pedal it seems like it's pretty well liked by other players.
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#5
Quote by Knight Elijah
With the tone knob... If I don't want it to change my tone would 12:00 be unchanged? Or would all the way left be unchanged? Like if I put the tone knob to 0 would it take my tone away from my original sound? And then normal would be 12 and past 12 is added? Or is anything other than 0 added tone?

"Added tone" doesn't really mean anything, but according to that particular pedal's manual, at 0 (i.e. fully counterclockwise) the tone knob does nothing. As far as I can tell turning it clockwise gives you extra treble.
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#6
The thing that confuses me the most about this question is that you have all the tools at hand to acquire definitive answers, but you're here asking our opinions about gear you have sitting in front of you?
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#7
^ no what's confusing me more is that he's using a compressor (which normally adds noise) to let him set his noise gate higher. i could be wrong, and maybe it does work in practice (i've never tried it), but it strikes me as one of those two wrongs trying to make a right type things.
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#8
Quote by Arby911
The thing that confuses me the most about this question is that you have all the tools at hand to acquire definitive answers, but you're here asking our opinions about gear you have sitting in front of you?


+1

Elijah - i don't understand this either, you have it in front of you, turn the knobs and see how you like it.
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#9
Well because quite honestly it's hard to tell what the tone knob does. You can't just isolate it, if I turn of the whole compressor and then turn it on with the tone knob all the way down to see if it takes away or adds specific tone, I cannot tell due to the fact that the compressor does so many other things simultaneously. How do I know that the difference between comp off and comp on/tone at a specific setting is even that big of a difference when purely the compressor being off or on is such a big change already?

I can turn to knob while it's on to see the results but they are not extremely prominent and there would be no way to know if it is taking away tone at 0 like my previous question was asking because if I turned the whole thing off to see if it was taking away tone, the other changes due to compression will most likely make it hard to isolate that variable

Anyway, as for the other comments, I have my gates set high for fast staccato riffing, but the comp sustain on full so that I don't lose sustain, it's not too hard to understand and although it may seem odd on paper, there is a system and it works extremely well. Many people do this actually.

Thanks for the help though
#10
Quote by Knight Elijah

Anyway, as for the other comments, I have my gates set high for fast staccato riffing, but the comp sustain on full so that I don't lose sustain, it's not too hard to understand and although it may seem odd on paper, there is a system and it works extremely well. Many people do this actually.


Yeah. I understood it, just it seemed a bit weird because the compressor will add noise, making you need to raise the threshold of the gate, which will cut sustain, leading you to raise the amount of compression, which will add noise, etc. etc. Classic vicious circle. But maybe for fast staccato riffing it does work, and as you said, if a lot of people do it, maybe it does work in practice even if the theory is a bit iffy (it wouldn't be the first guitar-related thing where that was the case ).
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Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

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Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

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Et tu, br00tz?
#12
You really need to learn how a compressor works and what they are used for.

Most guitar pedal compressors won't have a superfast attack even on lowest settings. But the attack knob sets how long it takes for the compression to take effect after the signal passes the threshold level [the attack and release knobs are crossfades of soughts].

Broadly speaking, slow attack will compress more of the tail, generally good for levelling and instruments without sharp transients. A fast attack will compress after the initial transient - emphasising the attack of the instrument, and a superfast attack will clamp down on the transient, decreasing the attack or bring out the tail. Not all compressors are capable of attacks that fast.

Actual settings will very much depend on the source material and the specific compressor.

But the point is, you should know what a compressor does, and know what you want to achieve. None of what I've mentioned is really going to help with a noise gate. For one, compressors generally increase the noise floor - especially with high gain sounds. Second, a high gain sound will already be very compressed. Further compressing the sound more often than not doesn't make it sound 'generic' so much, but rather just makes it sound shit.

'Sustain' on compressors in general equates more or less to threshold. So by increasing sustain all you're doing is making you're signal really really compressed.

For a noise gate, a compressor will cause more problems rather than help. It's not gonna lift the general level of your signal away from the noise floor - but rather it's going to compress your peaks so that the signal is actually closer to the noise floor. The noise floor will probably also be raised by the pedal.
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#13
Quote by Arby911
The thing that confuses me the most about this question is that you have all the tools at hand to acquire definitive answers, but you're here asking our opinions about gear you have sitting in front of you?

I think he is making sure he is not doing something frowned upon in the gear world. Using a Metalzone in front of a 5150, a Line 6 Spider, etc.

I am not sure if this is what you consider high gain, but he is using a compressor and it sounds fine to me...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x45VMEUASIw