#1
I've heard other players say they learned their guitar skills from so and so. Recently named artists that I've heard we're jimi Hendrix(caged) and chuck berry. Name some artists and the techniques you've learned from them.
#2
I think you learn more style than technique from other musicians. Technique is something you really have to own for yourself, even if you're trying to imitate the sounds of other guitarist. To my knowledge, not many famous players have actual techniques completely unique to them, it's just the way they employ their techniques that makes them interesting players.

As far as players whose styles I admire and learn from....
Trey Anastasio
Jimmy Page
Brent Mason
Mark Knopfler
Jake Cinninger
Wes Montgomery
David Gilmour

mostly standard influences, as far as guitarists go. Once you get past basic technique and stuff, there's nothing wrong with picking up style from non-guitarists. I often find inspiration in keyboardists, because the chord voicings are so different from typical guitar voicings and can get at moods that you don't often hear expressed on guitar alone. Classic sax players pretty much set the standard for instrumental melodicism.
Last edited by cdgraves at Nov 16, 2015,
#3
cd graves has a great list there, I will provide mine:

Hendrix - complex rhythm playing that is world's above 99% of rock or blues players, even today. Learn Little Wing, Castles Made of Sand, Axis Bold as Love and Wind Cries Mary - those songs will catapult your rhythm playing and really open up the fretboard.

Mark Knopfler - his phrasing on solos is unmatched - he is a great study in restraint and phrasing - see Sultans of Swing and Brothers in Arms. He plays fingerstyle on electric, which is rare.

Bill Frisell - similarly to Mark Knopfler, his phrasing is amazing - he lets things ring out in a very unique and musical way and uses silence very effectively - check out Blues Dream, album for some easier examples, or his Beatles cover album. My playing improved greatly by simply listening to Bill.

Stevie Ray Vaughan - heavy funk strumming, string bending and vibrato - Stevie was like the Wikipedia of blues - you can hear bits of nearly every player before him in his style and he nails the execution - check out Lenny, Texas Flood, and his version of Little Wing. He has a ferocious picking hand - watch Live at the El Mocambo.

Don Ross and Andy McKee - open tuned acoustic fingerstyle - start with Don Ross as he is more accessible.

Satriani - legato and phrasing with heavy gain - legato is really his signature, but he uses a gazillion techniques. If Hendrix and Van halen had a baby it would be Satch.

John Scofield - electric funk playing - A Go Go album - it's as good as it gets. This is advanced soloing.

Eric Johnson and Eric Gales - fast unusual pentatonic picking runs - no one does it better than these two - Eric Johnson is the creator of the approach, but Gales has his own take on it.

Kurt Rosenwinkle : if you want the most advanced and insane guitar playing - this is your guy - check out the Alum " The Next Step" - don't even bother trying to learn this stuff until your 10 years in.
#5
I'm curious as to where any of you feel Joe Bonamassa fits into this discussion, if at all?

Me, I like Gilmour and Knopfler for melody, and Townshend for rhythm. And Jimmy Page when he's playing th 12 string. I know, I know, that's a limited spectrum.

But, should anybody go off on a country tangent, there's always Brad Paisley's version of shock and awe.
#7
Quote by Captaincranky
I'm curious as to where any of you feel Joe Bonamassa fits into this discussion, if at all?
.


Bonamassa is like a marriage of BB King, Clapton, SRV and Eric Johnson. He's amazing, but borrows heavily. Like SRV, he's like a flawless blues/rock encyclopedia.

His approach to fast picking pentatonic runs comes from Eric Johnson, just like Eric Gales.

Bonamassa is one of the best technical blues/rock players around - flawless execution. He uses nearly every technique imaginable, fast picking, fingerstyle etc..
#8
No Richie Blackmore? Love the way he melded classical music and speed metal (before anybody else was doing speed metal).
#9
What's with recommending guitarists renowned mostly for their technical solo work. I don't know why you would recommend someone like Jimi Hendrix to a beginner for learning fundamentals. He is an exceptional guitarist, but not someone a beginner should bother analysing in my opinion. If I were to recommend anyone it would just be a really solid rhythm player with some nice straight forward honest chops...
Not sure what music you're in to, but I think more suitable recommendations would be guitarists such as Angus Young, Tony Iommi, James Hetfield etc. Most these recommendations seem inappropriate for a beginner.

A beginner learning Texas Flood by SRV for example.. Exceptional song, but not a good basis for a beginner to learn fundamentals. It has too many elements that would make it far too overwhelming for a beginner.

Just my 2 cents.
Last edited by vayne92 at Nov 20, 2015,
#10
Quote by vayne92
What's with recommending guitarists renowned mostly for their technical solo work. I don't know why you would recommend someone like Jimi Hendrix to a beginner for learning fundamentals. He is an exceptional guitarist, but not someone a beginner should bother analysing in my opinion. If I were to recommend anyone it would just be a really solid rhythm player with some nice straight forward honest chops...
Not sure what music you're in to, but I think more suitable recommendations would be guitarists such as Angus Young, Tony Iommi, James Hetfield etc. Most these recommendations seem inappropriate for a beginner.

A beginner learning Texas Flood by SRV for example.. Exceptional song, but not a good basis for a beginner to learn fundamentals. It has too many elements that would make it far too overwhelming for a beginner.

Just my 2 cents.


Good point!
#11
Quote by reverb66
Hendrix - complex rhythm playing that is world's above 99% of rock or blues players, even today. Learn Little Wing, Castles Made of Sand, Axis Bold as Love and Wind Cries Mary - those songs will catapult your rhythm playing and really open up the fretboard.

I'd recommend John Frusciante before Hendrix. A lot of Froosh's work essentially constitutes a stripped-back version of what Hendrix did, and it ranges pretty nicely from really easy stuff to stuff on a level technically similar to Hendrix.
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