#1
Has anyone ever tried this? I looked on Craigslist and it was a lot of people looking to form bands in my area. I've been looking to get into a band and this seems like a great place to network. However, Im not sure how safe this site is. I was thinking that if i did choose to meet with someone i would meet up with them in a very public area where a lot of people are around. Does this sound like an ok idea? Has anyone gotten bandmates through the internet before?
#2
Dude, I think you're putting a little too much though into this, you're like a girl going on a date affraid of getting raped a little too much here.Calm down, other musicians are not out to get you.
#3
Quote by King Shredder
Dude, I think you're putting a little too much though into this, you're like a girl going on a date affraid of getting raped a little too much here.Calm down, other musicians are not out to get you.

Im guessing you never heard of the Craigslist killer, huh?
#5
Quote by King Shredder
Nope, was he after musicians?

I don't know what his motive was. He would just meet with a ton of people through Craigslist and kill them. This happened years ago though.
#7
Quote by King Shredder
I wouldn't worry about it.

Yeah, you're probably right. I have a bad habit of overthinking everything.
#8
I haven't used craigslist to find band members but I've used for other things and I have gotten tons of spam emailed to me, but other than that it has worked pretty good.
#9
Quote by J23L
Has anyone ever tried this? I looked on Craigslist and it was a lot of people looking to form bands in my area. I've been looking to get into a band and this seems like a great place to network. However, Im not sure how safe this site is. I was thinking that if i did choose to meet with someone i would meet up with them in a very public area where a lot of people are around. Does this sound like an ok idea? Has anyone gotten bandmates through the internet before?


I've found several band mates on CL before. Some were great, some were flakes. Meeting in a public place to discuss goals and ideas is fine. An open mic night where you can jam a bit is good too. There are safe ways to go about this to protect yourself from freaks, criminals, and losers.

I vet all my players in 3 ways:

1. Ask for a link to youtube, Reverb, or Soundcloud so I can hear their recorded material. What? They have no recorded material? Call me when you have some. Every skilled musician has some recorded material to share if they are worth a damn. Those without it are not serious players so move on.

2. Ask what other bands they played with in the last 3 years and how many gigs did they play. Who was in the band? Would they give a good reference?

3. Find someone I know who has worked with them before and get a trusted personal reference. Were they dependable? Do they have a substance abuse problem? Would they work with them again?

If their recordings demonstrate they are a solid player, they have lots of live gig experience, and my friends recommend them, we will get together and jam informally with a few others to see if it is a good musical fit.

This eliminates nearly all personal risk and brings the best players to the top.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
Last edited by Cajundaddy at Nov 19, 2015,
#10
Quote by Cajundaddy
I've found several band mates on CL before. Some were great, some were flakes. Meeting in a public place to discuss goals and ideas is fine. An open mic night where you can jam a bit is good too. There are safe ways to go about this to protect yourself from freaks, criminals, and losers.

I vet all my players in 3 ways:

1. Ask for a link to youtube, Reverb, or Soundcloud so I can hear their recorded material. What? They have no recorded material? Call me when you have some. Every skilled musician has some recorded material to share if they are worth a damn. Those without it are not serious players so move on.

2. Ask what other bands they played with in the last 3 years and how many gigs did they play. Who was in the band? Would they give a good reference?

3. Find someone I know who has worked with them before and get a trusted personal reference. Were they dependable? Do they have a substance abuse problem? Would they work with them again?

If their recordings demonstrate they are a solid player, they have lots of live gig experience, and my friends recommend them, we will get together and jam informally with a few others to see if it is a good musical fit.

This eliminates nearly all personal risk and brings the best players to the top.

Ok, thanks for the good advice. Also, I've never been in a band or gigged before so this will all be entirely new for me. I hope i don't fuck it up . But hey, you gotta start somewhere
#11
Quote by Cajundaddy
I've found several band mates on CL before. Some were great, some were flakes. Meeting in a public place to discuss goals and ideas is fine. An open mic night where you can jam a bit is good too. There are safe ways to go about this to protect yourself from freaks, criminals, and losers.

I vet all my players in 3 ways:

1. Ask for a link to youtube, Reverb, or Soundcloud so I can hear their recorded material. What? They have no recorded material? Call me when you have some. Every skilled musician has some recorded material to share if they are worth a damn. Those without it are not serious players so move on.

2. Ask what other bands they played with in the last 3 years and how many gigs did they play. Who was in the band? Would they give a good reference?

3. Find someone I know who has worked with them before and get a trusted personal reference. Were they dependable? Do they have a substance abuse problem? Would they work with them again?

If their recordings demonstrate they are a solid player, they have lots of live gig experience, and my friends recommend them, we will get together and jam informally with a few others to see if it is a good musical fit.

This eliminates nearly all personal risk and brings the best players to the top.

Also, what type of recorded material should i be looking for? Anything specific? Original material? Covers of songs?
#12
Quote by J23L
Ok, thanks for the good advice. Also, I've never been in a band or gigged before so this will all be entirely new for me. I hope i don't fuck it up . But hey, you gotta start somewhere


Hey we all screw up sometimes, it is the human condition. Then we get up, dust ourselves off, and learn from our experiences. Now go record some guitar work and post it so you can share with potential band mates. Then they will they know YOU are serious.
"Your sound is in your hands as much as anything. It's the way you pick, and the way you hold the guitar, more than it is the amp or the guitar you use." -- Stevie Ray Vaughan

"Anybody can play. The note is only 20 percent. The attitude of the motherfucker who plays it is 80 percent." -- Miles Davis

Guthrie on tone: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zmohdG9lLqY
#13
I've tried getting together with people off Clist before....The only problem is getting people to actually show up lol. I get responses but nobody seems very serious.
Just another Sheep in the design of the Almighty Machine.


-GEAR-
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Podx3
#14
Quote by J23L
Also, what type of recorded material should i be looking for? Anything specific? Original material? Covers of songs?


well anything as long as it's good and appropriate to whatever kind of music they're auditioning to play. The point is that anyone who is serious about music has recordings. It's like a musical resume. Like the guy above, I don't generally bother with people who I can't hear ahead of time.

Last time I tried to audition a person who lacked recordings, I got a "singer" who had no music ready to sing, only one verse of his own original material, no experience on stage, and no vocal equipment.

For myself, I get auditions with basic demos of different styles (linked in my signature). I have original music, too, but most paying situations are not terribly concerned with originality so much as proficiency. The idea is to show prospective bandmates that I can play decently and care enough about music to record it and put it out there.