#1
Hey!
I just want to say I don't know anything about the theory of guitars - tuning them and stuff. I only play around with some chords and learn how to play my favorite songs and I write my own simple songs. Suddenly one day I noticed something strange. When I don't use capo or when I use it on the first or second fret, it's all perfect. However, when I use a capo on the third, fourth, fifth, sixth and so on, my G string sounds so weird... Out of tune... Just... Just very very bad. I've already checked a million times whether it was well tuned and it is. What do I do? Please, help me, I have no idea what to do in such situations.
#2
There might be some kind of problem with your neck alignment. You might need to cough up some dough to bring it to a luthier to set the truss, file the nut/bridge etc. Other than that what I'd do is just retune the G whenever you use a capo
#3
could very easily be the bridge. I don't know what type of guitar you have, but depending of the type of bridge, there could be a malfunction concerning the g string saddle. Or the nut at the g string place. You could check for obvious things by yourself, otherwise let a luthier take a look at it.
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-Jackson Soloist Std. Professional '93
DiMarzio Evolution (bridge) SD Lil' Screamin Demon (neck)

-B.C. Rich Warlock Special Edition Metal Web

-Peavey Bandit 112
#6
i suspect your g string intonation is off. fwiw, the g is the problem child of the string world and also since is is probably a bit out, it sounds worse when you capo further up the neck.

btw, are you clamping the capo correctly? in the right spot and not too hard?

check your intonation: using a decent tuner, (something clip-on is best imo) tune your guitar to spec. then one string at a time going from treble to bass, play the note at the 12th fret. the notes should be the same but one octave apart +/-1~2 cents. do this for all of your stings.

to fix: your saddle ramps need to be adjusted. on a fixed, pin type non-adjustable saddle typical of most acoustic guitars, this is done by filing a pointed ramp either towards the headstock or away from it depending upon whether your strings are sharp or flat and how much. some saddles are compensated from the factory (sometimes not exactly where you want) and some are not. if you're not comfortable doing this it's best left to a set up person or a luthier.
Last edited by ad_works at Nov 19, 2015,
#7
No doubt it's #. Most likely intonation problem. OTOH if you don't have good action the stretching of the smallest wound string (the G) could be a problem. I check intonation by comparing the harmonic (pluck the string by touching without pressing it down) with the actual press both at the 12th fret for each string.
It could be the string is out on all the frets just that near the nut it's not as noticeable. If it's running consistently sharp with good action replace the bridge (the white piece that sits in the wood saddle) with a compensated one. A "fully" compensated bridge ramps e forward, B back, G forward then curve the rest backward on a gradient to top E.
#9
Quote by tomodellfan
Hey!
I just want to say I don't know anything about the theory of guitars - tuning them and stuff. I only play around with some chords and learn how to play my favorite songs and I write my own simple songs. Suddenly one day I noticed something strange. When I don't use capo or when I use it on the first or second fret, it's all perfect. However, when I use a capo on the third, fourth, fifth, sixth and so on, my G string sounds so weird... Out of tune... Just... Just very very bad. I've already checked a million times whether it was well tuned and it is. What do I do? Please, help me, I have no idea what to do in such situations.
You could try re-tuning the guitar with the capo in place.

A guitar tuned completely open to standard pitch will generally go slightly sharp as you go up the neck.

Part of that issue can be eliminated by having the action set correctly. The higher the action is, the sharper strings will go when fretted. Another issue here is, different diameter strings will change pitch at different rates, even though the tension from the capo may be equal across the fret board.

So, put your capo on, and measure the tuning again. Any chromatic tuner will tell you the exact note the string is producing. Essentially though, the actual note doesn't matter, you just want to re-center the tuner's pointer.

If you do it with capo in place, you'll get it dead on. Oh, and sort of snap/pull the strings a bit, after the capo is in place, to make sure the strings aren't sticking behind the capo.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Nov 20, 2015,